PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS-regular highschool level, statistics homework help

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Plz take a look at this assignment and do it only if u are 100 percent sureu can answer all of them.....there are several files u need to complete the actual graded assingment....i am providing  u with all of them.....THE FIRST THREE FILE THAT ARE UPLOADED ARE THE FILES YOU NEED TO FINISH THE ASSINGMENT IT SELF........ THE LAST FILE IS THE FILE WITH THE GRADED ASSINGMENT IN IT......IN THE GRADED ASSIGNMENT FILE...THERE ARE 3 PARTS... IN ORDERFOR THE ASSIGNMENT TO BE COMPLETE ALL THREE PARTS MUST BE COMPLETE SO BE SURE U FINSIH THAT... plz get the correct answers as this is very important.


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Math | The Math Help Column | Solutions to Your Everyday Math Dilemmas Name: Date: The Math Help Column Solutions to Your Everyday Math Dilemmas Enter a response to each question. 1. Dear Math Helper, I am in need of your help! I have a job where I design games. I am designing a game that involves a playing area with 12 equal sections. Players randomly end up in one of the sections. I labeled one section, "Gain 40 points," four sections, "Gain 10 points," and the rest, "Try Again." Also, each player automatically gives up 10 points with each move. After trying out the game on some volunteers, I noticed that players tend to lose points in the long run. Without changing the sizes of the sections, what adjustments can I make so that players are likely to earn at least one point, in the long run? Signed, Game Maker Dear Game Maker, Type your response here. 2. Dear Math Helper, First, let me tell you how much I enjoy your column. It is the first thing I read in every issue. I run a carpet cleaning company and need some advice. I want to offer steam cleaner rentals, because some people prefer to save money by cleaning their own carpets. But steam cleaners are expensive and they need repairs if not used properly, so I'm going to offer insurance policies. I'm not sure how much to charge. It will cost me $190 to replace one of my cleaners, and repairs average $100. I talked to some other people I know in the business and they said I should expect to replace a cleaner for about 1 of every 50 rentals and to repair a cleaner for about 1 of every 20 rentals. I'm not sure what to do with all this information. Please help me determine a fair price for my insurance policy. I want my rates to be low enough that customers buy the insurance, but high enough that I don't lose money by offering it. And please show me how you came up with your figure, so that I can make adjustments later if I need to. Your number one fan, Steaming in Seattle Dear Steaming in Seattle, Type your response here. 3. Dear Math Helper, I work in construction and am pretty good in math, especially with fractions, so I didn't think I would ever have to write to you. But this one has got me stumped. © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 1 of 3 Math | The Math Help Column | Solutions to Your Everyday Math Dilemmas Last week I bought two boxes of nails, each from a different manufacturer. I poured the nails from one box into my left pocket and the other into my right. I started to use the ones in my left pocket, but they kept breaking and bending. I will never use them again. But here's my problem. I don't remember which box they came from. I contacted both manufacturers and "Manufacturer A" said their boxes have a mean of 205.4 nails and a standard deviation of 1.8 nails. "Manufacturer B" said their boxes have a mean of 190.6 nails and a standard deviation of 3.3 nails. Both said their number of nails is normally distributed. I counted the nails from my left pocket, including the used ones, and got 198. This is 7.4 nails less than Manufacturer A and 7.4 nails more than Manufacturer B. So I guess the standard deviation comes into play, but I don't know how. Please explain which manufacturer most likely made these defective nails. Sincerely, Stumped Builder Dear Stumped Builder, Type your response here. 4. Dear Math Helper, Please help settle this friendly dispute. My friend, let's call her Pam, took the same history course I did, but we had different professors. On the final exam, I scored 82 out of 100 points while she scored 47 out of 63 points. My percent score, 82%, is greater than her percent score, which is about 75%. So I think I did better than she did on the final exam. But she tells me that both sets of scores are normally distributed and that I have to look at the standard scores to find out who did better. Pam tells me that the mean and standard deviation for my test are 76.1 and 6.5, respectively, while hers are 40 and 4.2 respectively, so if I "do the math," then I should see why she performed better. Can you please explain what she means by standard scores and can you "do the math" that she mentions. Yours, Confused History Buff P.S. If she did perform better, I have to buy her dinner! Dear Confused History Buff, Type your response here. 5. Dear Math Helper, You write a great column, and I hope you stay around for years to come. I run a small boarding school. We are going to begin using test scores to help determine admissions eligibility. The scores for the test I have in mind are normally distributed with a mean of 300 and a standard deviation of 12.5. Can you show me how to determine the cutoff score if we should use to only accept only applicants who score in the top 10% on the test? What cutoff score includes the top 15%? Thanks in advance. Regards, © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 2 of 3 Math | The Math Help Column | Solutions to Your Everyday Math Dilemmas The Student Selector Dear Student Selector, Type your response here. 6. Dear Math Helper, How's it going? I'm in the business of printing T-shirts and just got an interesting order. My sister is pre-med student and wants to show off how well she performed on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). I told her I’d make her a T-shirt, but she’s not making it easy for me. She wants the back of the shirt to read, "I scored at the nth percentile on the MCAT!" But instead of giving me the value of n, she told me her individual score was 38 and that all the test scores are normally distributed with a mean of 25 and a standard deviation of 6.4. I don’t want to let her think she’s smarter than me, even if she is going to be a doctor! Can you explain how I should use these numbers to find the value of n for her shirt? If so, maybe there's a free T-shirt in your future! Many thanks, T-shirt Guy Dear T-shirt Guy, Type your response here. © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 3 of 3 Math| Random Variables and Distributions Unit Application| Application Overview Random Variables and Distributions Unit Application Application Overview Review the requirements for completing the Graded Assignment. Goals Have you ever read an advice column and wondered how much fun it would be to write the responses? During this unit, you will play the role of an advice columnist, answering pleas for help with personal math situations. Your column, The Math Help Column, appears in every issue of a popular magazine. Your editor needs six questions and answers for the next issue of the magazine in which your column appears. In the first part, you will respond to letters from two readers whose problems you can solve by finding an expected value. Later assignments will involve using different math skills. Schedule of Completion Part 1: Submit to your teacher via the Dropbox one day after you complete the Expected Value lesson. Part 2: Submit to your teacher via the Dropbox one day after you complete the Comparing Scores lesson. Discussion: After you’ve completed Part 2, participate in a discussion with fellow students, if directed by your teacher. Part 3: Submit to your teacher via the Dropbox one day after you complete the Finding Standard Scores lesson. Discussion: After your teacher has reviewed your work, participate in a discussion with fellow students, if directed by your teacher. Graded Assignments for Random Variables and Distributions You will write responses to six letters, each from a reader with a dilemma involving statistics. The types of situations will vary, but each problem has a solution based on applying statistics principles. Keep in mind that your readers enjoy math, but don't necessarily know all the vocabulary or Greek letters common in statistics. So try to keep your explanations simple, yet complete. Part 1 Open the Math Help Column.doc file. Scroll through the file, noticing that there are six pages, each with a different letter to you, the Math Helper. Type your name at the top of the first page in the space provided. Read the letters from Game Maker and Steaming in Seattle. For each, write clear, easy-to-follow responses in the space provided below each letter. Provide fully worked solutions, including tables or diagrams as needed. Your responses can go beyond the page it starts on—take all the space you need. Your detailed responses are one of the main reasons your readers love you. Part 2 Adjust your responses to Game Maker and Steaming in Seattle if your teacher indicated something incorrect in them. Read the letters from Stumped Builder and Confused History Buff. For each, write clear, easy-to-follow responses in the space provided below each letter. Provide fully worked solutions, including tables or diagrams as needed. Your responses can go beyond the page it starts on—take all the space you need. © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 1 of 2 Math| Random Variables and Distributions Unit Application| Application Overview Part 3 Adjust your responses to Stumped Builder and Confused History Buff if your teacher indicated something incorrect in them. Read the letters from The Student Selector and T-shirt Guy. For each, write clear, easy-to-follow responses in the space provided below each letter. Provide fully worked solutions, including tables or diagrams as needed. Your responses can go beyond the page it starts on—take all the space you need. © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 2 of 2 ...
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Tutor Answer

m1chael
School: New York University

Hello here are the answers.. I submitted this document with only the answers to the letters to check it for plagiarism. Check the answers and later i will send you the full document with the questions ;)

1.
Dear Game Maker,
I really appreciate that you have contacted me. In this case it seems that the design of
your game needs some adjustments. As you noticed, after trying the game with the help
of volunteers, players are losing points after few turns. This can be explained using
probability theory. The concept that we will use in this case is called expected value, which
is the long-run average value of repetitions of the experiment it represents.
First of all we assume that each section is equally likely to appear, and no biases affect our
trials. This means that the probability for each event is equal and it is equal to1/12. As
each player gives up 10 points with each move, we are going to calculate the expected
“profit” for each move. In example if a player is lucky enough to get the 40 points section,
the profit in points will be 30 points, for the sections with 10 points it will be zero points
and for the “Try again” sections it will be -10 points.
Considering these facts we can calculate the expected value, which is the sum of each
variable’s multiplication with the corresponding probability. Expected value is symbolizes
as E(X), and in this case it is equal to E(X)=30×1/12+4×0×1/12+7×(-10)×1/12=-3.33
As we can see the expected value is negative, so it’s expected that players are losing points
in the long run. Considering that, you have to make some adjustments in your game
design.
As you mentioned you want the players to win at least one point in the long run, so the
expected value has to be at least 1. As you...

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Anonymous
Good stuff. Would use again.

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