Management assignment 1 help

Anonymous
timer Asked: May 19th, 2016
account_balance_wallet $20

Question Description

2-3 pages

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Running head: TITLE OF PAPER 1 Title of Paper Goes Here APA Format Sixth Edition Student Name Kaplan University TITLE OF PAPER ALL CAPS 2 The body of your paper, which begins with the introduction but do not use the title “Introduction”. It is assumed the first paragraph is an introduction. APA style specifies that major sections of the paper (abstract, body, references, etc.) each begin on a new page with the heading centered at the top of the page. Sections can be further divided into subsections with headings. Unlike in earlier editions of the APA manual, in APA 6th edition you bold the titles within the paper (but not the title above or anything on the title page), as you see in the examples below. You should also have 2 spaces after a period, so please remember that. Heading Level 1 Heading Level 2 Citations and References There is plenty of information available on citation methods in the Kaplan Writing Center. When in doubt, follow the latest edition of the APA manual and any additional information you get in class. Citations The following is an example of a properly formatting citation used within a paragraph in APA. Notice that there are several types of in-text citations which are used in the paragraph below. No one type of citation is best, and the type of citation you choose will depend on your writing and the information you are using or providing: “Educators have long suggested that having a large contingent of part time workers (in this case faculty) can lead to a bifurcated work force” (Gappa & Leslie, 1997, p. 1). According to Johnson (2006) most part time faculty are either full time faculty at other institutions or have made a professional career out of adjunct work at various institutions. Faculty therefore have no long term commitment to or from the institution (Maldonado & Riman, 2008). They rarely TITLE OF PAPER ALL CAPS 3 become part of the community of the institution and therefore, they never become part of the culture of the institution (Bergquist & Pawlak, 2008). Notice in the above paragraph that several types of citation are used. The first citation is a direct quote which is indicated by the quotation marks. Therefore author last name or names, year and page all go in the parenthetical reference (the part within the parentheses). In the second citation the author is being used in the sentence itself rather than at the end, and therefore author name is outside of parentheses while year is within parentheses. In the third citation there is no direct quote and the information is paraphrased, or put into your own words, and therefore only author names and year is listed. The final citation is the same as the third one in terms of APA rules. References An example of a References section is located later this template and shows use of capitalization and use of the hanging indent. Otherwise, the easiest way to do this is to type each reference without worrying about the hanging indent. Then, when you are finished, select all the references at once (and nothing else) and apply the hanging indent. You may need to check the box in word that keeps it from adding a space between paragraphs (same location as the hanging indent feature) so that you do not have too much space between entries on the reference page). Also remember that ONLY the first word in the title of a book or article should be capitalized unless there is a punctuation mark (period, colon, question mark) within the title. In that case the first word after the punctuation is also capitalized. Assuming we have now finished the document, you will want to formulate the references page. You would insert a page break after the last sentence in the paper to ensure that the reference page begins on a new page. Notice on the reference page that several types of outside TITLE OF PAPER ALL CAPS sources are given as examples. Carefully review the use of italics, where they are used (journal name or book name in most cases, and the volume of a journal if there is one) and pay careful attention to the capitalization used in the references. Hope this helps! 4 TITLE OF PAPER ALL CAPS 5 References Bergquist, W. & Pawlak, K. (2008). Engaging the six cultures of the academy. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons. Gappa, J. & Leslie, D. (1997). Two faculties or one? The conundrum of part-timers in a bifurcated workforce. New Pathways: Faculty career and employment for the 21st century. Working Papers Series, Inquiry #1. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. Johnson, I.Y. (2006). Examining part-time faculty utilization and its impact on student retention at a public research university. Online Submission, Paper presented at the Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) (46th, Chicago, IL, May 14-18, 2006). Maldonado, E., & Riman, J. (2008). The adjunct advocate @ FIT: Bringing part time faculty Robbins, S., & Judge, T. (2013). Organizational behavior. (15th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall Publishing. In this Assignment you will apply the concepts you read about in Chapter 1 relative to both defining organizational behavior and the impact of organizational behavior on business outcomes. As you could see in our Discussions, many of the POLC functions of management are impacted by organizational behavior concepts. The Assignment for this section is Case Incident 1: “Lessons for ‘Undercover’ Bosses” (found at the end of Chapter 1 of your text). Please use the Assignment template, which is provided in this section only. It will give you an idea of the general format for subsequent Assignments. Respond in essay format to the following 4 questions regarding case incident as seen in the Assignment document below. Checklist: Address the following questions in your 2—3 page essay adding an additional title and references page: 1. What are some of the things managers can learn by walking around and having daily contact with line employees that they might not be able to learn from looking at data and reports? 2. As an employee, would you appreciate knowing your supervisor regularly spent time with workers? How would knowing top executives routinely interact with line employees affect your attitudes toward the organization? 3. What ways can executives and other organizational leaders learn about day-to-day business operations besides going “undercover?” 4. Are there any dangers in the use of a management by walking around strategy? Could this strategy lead employees to feel they are being spied on? What actions on the part of managers might minimize these concerns? The minimum page count requirement for this Assignment is 2–3 pages in a Microsoft® Word® document using correct APA format and citation style; this does not include the cover page or the references page. CASE INCIDENT 1 “Lessons for ‘Undercover’ Bosses” Executive offices in major corporations are often far removed from the day-today work that most employees perform. While top executives might enjoy the perquisites found in the executive suite, and separation from workday concerns can foster a broader perspective on the business, the distance between management and workers can come at a real cost: top managers often fail to understand the ways most employees do their jobs every day. The dangers of this distant approach are clear. Executives sometimes make decisions without recognizing how difficult or impractical they are to implement. Executives can also lose sight of the primary challenges their employees face. The practice of “management by walking around” (MBWA) works against the insularity of the executive suite. To practice MBWA, managers reserve time to walk through departments regularly, form networks of acquaintances in the organization, and get away from their desks to talk to individual employees. The practice was exemplified by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, who used this management style at HP to learn more about the challenges and opportunities their employees were encountering. Many other organizations followed suit and found that this style of management had advantages over a typical desk-bound approach to management. A recent study of successful Swedish organizations revealed that MBWA was an approach common to several firms that received national awards for being great places to work. The popular television program Undercover Boss took MBWA to the next level by having top executives from companies like Chiquita Brands, DirectTV, Great Wolf Resorts, and NASCAR work incognito among line employees. Executives reported that this process taught them how difficult many of the jobs in their organizations were, and just how much skill was required to perform even the lowest-level tasks. They also said the experience taught them a lot about the core business in their organizations and sparked ideas for improvements. Although MBWA has long had its advocates, it does present certain problems. First, the time managers spend directly observing the workforce is time they are not doing their core job tasks like analysis, coordination, and strategic planning. Second, management based on subjective impressions gathered by walking around runs counter to a research and data-based approach to making managerial decisions. Third, it is also possible that executives who wander about will be seen as intruders and overseers. Implementing the MBWA style requires a great deal of foresight to avoid these potential pitfalls. Questions 1. What are some of the things managers can learn by walking around and having daily contact with line employees that they might not be able to learn from looking at data and reports? 2. As an employee, would you appreciate knowing your supervisor regularly spent time with workers? How would knowing top executives routinely interact with line employees affect your attitudes toward the organization? 3. What ways can executives and other organizational leaders learn about day-to-day business operations besides going “undercover?” 4. Are there any dangers in the use of a management by walking around strategy? Could this strategy lead employees to feel they are being spied on? What actions on the part of managers might minimize these concerns? Sources: Based on T. Peters and N. Austin, “Management by Walking About,” Economist (September 8, 2008),www.economist.com; F. Aguirre, M. White, K. Schaefer, and S. Phelps, “Secrets of an Undercover Boss,”Fortune (August 27, 2010), pp. 41–44; J. Larsson, I. Backstrom, and H. Wiklund, “Leadership and Organizational Behavior: Similarities between Three Award-Winning Organizations,” International Journal of Management Practice 3 (2009), pp. 327–345. ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

Robert__F
School: Duke University

Good luck in your study and if
you need any further help in your assignments, please let me know 
R

Undercover Boss
Management by Walking Around
Student Name
College/University

Abstract

Management by walking around is an innovative approach which has significant benefits
for businesses. The traditional role of managers, which was meant to only be seated in their
offices and analyze the data to formulate the strategies and polices is evolving into getting closer
to the operations and knowing what are the problems being encountered by those who make the
things happen on the ground. This approach is gaining popularity due to its effectiveness and
better results are being observed in terms of decision making by business leaders.

Introduction

The management by walking around can impact the learning of managers in a great
manner. This approach has innumerable advantages, and by applying it, managers can learn a great
deal about their employees and business operations. Firstly, sometimes there are busin...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
Good stuff. Would use again.

Similar Questions
Hot Questions
Related Tags
Study Guides

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors