History Discussion Question - 250 words needed

Jul 8th, 2014
Price: $5 USD

Question description

The End of Isolation

Background: In 1938, in Munich, the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain made a deal with Adolph Hitler allowing Nazi Germany to annex Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. Hailed as a hero for his diplomacy at the time, Chamberlain is now widely reviled for his policy of “appeasement” to Nazi aggression. Yet one year later, Chamberlain led Britain into war against Germany in defense of Poland once it became clear that appeasement had failed. By contrast, the US did little to halt Hitler’s initial expansion, and entered into the war only gradually, attempting, until attacked directly, to sway the outcome without going to war itself. Never again would the US remain so aloof for so long from such a momentous international affair. As such, the Second World War represents a turning point in American foreign affairs, and it is perhaps hard for us to understand why the US took so long to take effective action against the Axis Powers.

Resources: In your response, draw from material from AT LEAST TWO of the following documents and videos:

  1. Hogan, H. (Writer). (2003). World War II: The road to war. [Television series episode]. In R. Hawksworth (Executive producer), America in the 20th Century. New York, NY: Films for the Humanities & Sciences. Retrieved from http://digital.films.com/OnDemandEmbed.aspx?Token=36220&aid=18596&Plt=FOD&loid=0&w=640&h=480&ref= 
  2. Hogan, H. (Writer). (2003). World War II: The world at war. [Television series episode]. In R. Hawksworth (Executive producer), America in the 20th Century. New York, NY: Films for the Humanities & Sciences. Retrieved from http://digital.films.com/OnDemandEmbed.aspx?Token=36221&aid=18596&Plt=FOD&loid=0&w=640&h=480&ref= 
  3. Lindbergh, C. (1941, Sept. 11). Des Moines speech. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lindbergh/filmmore/reference/primary/desmoinesspeech.html
  4. United States Congress. (1936, Feb. 24).The Nye report. Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/nye.htm 
  5. Roosevelt, F. D. (1939, Sept. 3).Address of the President delivered by radio from the White House.Retrieved from http://www.mhric.org/fdr/chat14.html 
  6. United States Congress. (1936, Feb. 24). Neutrality act.Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/interwar/neutrality2.htm 
  7. United States Congress. (1941).Lend-lease act. Retrieved from http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=71&page=transcript
Instructions: After reviewing your Instructor’s Guidance and completing the weekly reading assignments (including those in the resource section above), please post a substantive discussion post of at least 200 words that examines the evolution of American foreign policy in the 1930s:What arguments were made in favor of isolationism? How and why did America’s isolationist stance erode entering into the 1940s? How did American foreign policy goals shape the American approach to the war? 

Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. Support your claims with examples from the required material(s) and properly cite any references. You may use additional scholarly sources to support your points if you choose. Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts by Day 7 in at least 100 words. When responding to classmates, you should refer to the material from one of the sources which you did not reference in your initial post. 

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