LSU Leadership and Professional Ethics Team Self-Leadership Discussion

User Generated

10fehyrf

Writing

Lousiana state univeristy

Description

Team Self-Leadership

  1. How do the terms self-leadership and teams not contradict one another? What are the key components of “team-self leadership” and how do those (if they do) differ from individual self-leadership?
  2. What are the key behavioral team-self-leadership practices and how do these differ from individual level approaches? Are these aspects of self-leadership ones that can only be applicable at the individual level, the team level, or both? Why
  3. Explain the basic premise of mental team self-leadership and how (if it does) it differs from individual level self-leadership. What are the key collective mental strategies and what does each skill add to mental team self-leadership?

Unformatted Attachment Preview

LHRD 2723 Chapter 6 Introduction to Team SelfLeadership Leadership Development Self-Leadership Quotable… “We are responsible for our own effectiveness, our own happiness, and ultimately, I would say, for most of our circumstances.” ~ Stephen R. Covey American Businessman & Author 1932 – 2012 “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” ~ Thomas J. Watson American Businessman (Former CEO of IBM) 1874-1956 Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Types of Team Self-Leadership • • • • Self-Directed Work Teams Self-Managed Work Teams High Performance Teams Empowered Work Teams Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Benefits of Team Self-Leadership • • • • Increased productivity Higher quality product & customer service Employee quality of life Reduced Costs, Turnover, & Absenteeism Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Characteristics of Team Self-Leadership • Team members have an increased amount of responsibility and control over their work • Teams perform many of the tasks that previously were the responsibility of management, such as: – Conducting meetings – Solving technical and personal problems – Making a wide range of decisions including: • Performance methods • Who will complete which task Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Signs of Successful Team Leadership • The best self-led/managed work teams have: – Capable and committed members who successfully combine their skills and knowledge for the good of the team. – Members who accept and appreciate unique contributions each member can make while effectively combining individual member contributions for the good of the team. – Synergy (e.g. 1+1+1 = 4, 5, or more). Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Self-Leadership & Teams • Self-leadership is as important when working on a team as it is when you work independently. • Only by effectively leading yourself can you help the team lead itself, reach its potential, and maximize synergy. • Team self-leadership involves a team collectively leading itself to achieve objectives. • Like self-leadership, team self-leadership involves certain cognitive & behavioral strategies. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Behavioral Components of Team Self-Leadership • • • • • Team self-observation Team self-goal setting Team cue modification Team self-reward & self-punishment Team rehearsal (practice) Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Cognitive Components of Team Self-Leadership • • • • • Group Mindsets Team Beliefs and Assumptions Team Self-Talk Team Mental Imagery Team Thought Patterns Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Effective Team Self-Leadership Begins with Effective Individual Self-Leadership • To practice effective team self-leadership, you must: – Maintain your own unique belief system and viewpoint while working together as a team. – Recognize it is productive to disagree and constructively discuss different viewpoints. – Achieve a good balance between a focus on yourself and a focus on the team. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Balancing the “Me” with the “We” • “The best potential in ‘me’ is ‘we’” (old proverb). • To reach your ultimate potential at school and work, you must work with your team and not against it. • You must focus on others and share the credit for successes. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Shared Leadership • A dynamic interactive influence process in which team members lead one another to accomplish team goals successfully.* • Leadership comes from, and is received by, all team members such that all members of the team actively engage in the leadership of the team. • Everyone on the team is a leader, at least some of the time, and shares in the overall leadership processes involved in project execution. • Shared leadership and self-leadership are inextricably linked because team members incapable of self-leadership are also incapable of shared leadership. – * Special thanks to Craig Pearce who contributed to this section on shared leadership. See chapter 6 footnote 12 for more information. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Shared Leadership Continued • Self-leaders have the self-confidence and self-awareness to know their abilities as well as their limitations. • Clear self-knowledge enables capable self-leaders to: – 1. Lead others when they themselves possess knowledge relevant to the task at hand. – 2. Be led by others when others possess knowledge relevant to the task at hand. • In our new, team-based environments, having a group of people who are capable of self-leadership is necessary, but not sufficient, to guarantee the success of a team. • The next generation of leadership requires engaging fully in shared leadership such that all team members are capable self-leaders, capable of leading others, and capable of being led. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Groupthink vs. Teamthink • Groupthink definition: The tendency for groups to become overly conforming and ineffective in their decision making.* • Teamthink definition: Team members strike a balance between themselves (the “me”) and the team (the “we”).** – * For a detailed discussion of groupthink, see I. L. Janis, Groupthink (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1983); Janis, Irving L. "Groupthink." • In Leadership: Understanding the dynamics of power and influence in organizations (2nd ed.), 157-169. Notre Dame, IN, US: University of Notre Dame Press, 2007 – ** For an extended discussion of the teamthink and groupthink concepts, see Neck and Manz, “From Groupthink to Teamthink,” pp. 929–952; – and C. C. Manz and C. P. Neck, “Teamthink: Beyond the Groupthink Syndrome in Self-Managing Work Teams,’’ Journal ofExcellence, Managerial 10Publications, (1995): 7–15. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal 1st Psychology edition. © SAGE 2017. Groupthink vs. Teamthink Continued • The cons of Groupthink: – Too much “we-ness” can lead to a situation in which members blindly follow the team as a whole. – The team gets trapped in a vicious circle whereby it neither progresses nor performs well. – People tend to stay silent when they should speak up. • The pros of Teamthink: – Members work together as a cohesive unit, but remain willing to constructively disagree when necessary. – Teamthink is the key to: • The achievement of Synergy. • Becoming an effective self-leadership team. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Groupthink vs. Teamthink Continued Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Virtual Team Self-Leadership • Little research to date has examined the role of self-leadership in virtual teams.* However… • Self-leadership processes would appear to be especially important in a virtual context where team members are expected to work more autonomously and with less direct supervision and social support than in traditional face-toface teams. Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017. Self-Leadership Quotable… “Good, better, best. Never let it rest ‘til your good is better, and your better is best.” ~ St. Jerome Theologian & Historian 347-420 “Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.” ~ James Allen British Philosopher & Poet 1864-1912 Neck, Self-Leadership: Developing Your Personal Excellence, 1st edition. © SAGE Publications, 2017.
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Explanation & Answer:
1 Page
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Explanation & Answer

Your work is complete. Please have a look at it and let me know if you need any correction before you submit it.The other file is just an outline on the same, you can choose to ignore it.

Running Head: LEADERSHIP ETHICS

1

Team Self Leadership
Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
Course
Date

LEADERSHIP ETHICS

2

Team Self Leadership
Question 1
The term self-leadership implies motivating oneself to work towards achieving the set
objectives. Teams, on the other hand, is a group of several individuals who come up together to
achieve a specific goal. Self-leadership and teams, therefore, closely relate ...


Anonymous
This is great! Exactly what I wanted.

Studypool
4.7
Indeed
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Similar Content

Related Tags