(500 Word Min) Week 5 Discussion 1 Supply Chain, management homework help

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Question Description

Use the attached course material to support your ideas.

Please cite web links to sources.


Readings:

  • Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? HBSP R1010G (2 pp.)
  • Don't Let Your Supply Chain Control Your Business HBSP R1112H (5 pp.)
  • Don't Tweak Your Supply Chain HBSP R1010C (8 pp.)

Purpose: The purpose of this discussion is to raise your level of awareness and bridge our in-class lessons with the "real world."

Find an article directly related to how companies are currently handling the issues raised in the materials we studied this week to date. The article may discuss how companies in general should address these concerns or the efforts of a specific company. Many corporations publish on the web annual sustainability reports that you may find useful for this assignment. Post the link to the article in the discussion thread so we can all read it. If you are or have been involved with this framework in your business experiences, you may choose to share your insights instead of finding an article.


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SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Note: This is the text -only version of this week’s lecture. All media (i.e. videos, flash presentations, and PowerPoints) and learning activities (i.e. assigned readings, assignments, and discussions) are accessible only through the online course. Week 5: The Road Ahead Week 5 Overview Log in to the course to view video and alternative version. Click the link below to access a transcript of the video. Video Transcript 1 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Week 5 Learning Activities Learning Activity Description Due Date Point Value   Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? Don't Let Your Supply Chain Control Your Business Complete by end of Day 1 ~  Don't Tweak Your Supply Chain Complete by end of Day 2 ~  Lesson 1 Complete by end of Day 2 ~  Find an article directly related to how companies are currently handling the issues raised in the materials we studied this week to date. Post by the end of Day 2; Respond by the end of Day 4 100  Vision 2050, The New Agenda for Business at http://www.wbcsd.org/vision2050.aspx Complete by end of Day 3 ~  Lesson 2 Complete by end of Day 3 ~  Joel Makower on Sustainability Developments in 2010 Scott Bolick on Integrated Reporting Complete by end of Day 4 ~  Provide your three most important takeaways from the course. Post by the end of Day 5; Respond by the end of Day 7 100 Final Project Executive Summary   Final Project Podcast Submit your Final Project executive summary. Complete by end of Day 7 100 Final Project Presentations  Submit your Final Project presentations. Complete by end of Day 7 100 Reading 1 Lesson 1 Podcast Discussion 1 Reading 2 Lesson 2 Podcast Lesson 2 Videos Discussion 2  Note: All assignments are to be submitted through the Assignments area of the course. Similarly, all discussions can be accessed in the Discussions area. 2 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Week 5 Learning Objectives By the end of this lesson, students should be able to:    Recognize the major sustainability developments, challenges and trends to date. Understand expert opinions on what companies need to do with respect to sustainability going forward. Form their own knowledge-based opinions on what it will take to reach the vision of a sustainable world. 3 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Lesson 1 Readings:    Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? HBSP R1010G (2 pp.) Don't Let Your Supply Chain Control Your Business HBSP R1112H (5 pp.) Don't Tweak Your Supply Chain HBSP R1010C (8 pp.) Podcast: Log in to the course to access audio file and alternative version. Transcript Discussions  Week 5 Discussion 1 (Post by Day 2, Respond by Day 4) o Find an article directly related to how companies are currently handling the issues raised in the materials we studied this week to date. The article may discuss how companies in general should address these concerns or the efforts of a specific company. Many corporations publish on the web annual sustainability reports that you may find useful for this assignment. Post the link to the article in the discussion thread so we can all read it. If you are or have been involved with this framework in your business experiences, you may choose to share your insights instead of finding an article. Post your response to the discussion which is accessible through the Discussion Board tab located on the left-hand navigation panel. 4 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Lesson 2 Reading:  Vision 2050, The New Agenda for Business Public Domain (70 pp.) Podcast: Log in to the course to access audio file and alternative version. Transcript Videos:  Joel Makower on Sustainability Developments in 2010. As part of the release of the 2011 State of Green Business Report, Joel Makower discusses some of the major developments and trends in sustainability in 2010. How do we get from here to there? Log in to the course to view video and alternative version. Transcript  Scott Bolick on Integrated Reporting Log in to the course to view video and alternative versi on. Transcript Presentation: SC & Sustainability Conclusions Log in to the course to view presentation and alternative version. Alternate Version Discussions  Week 5 Discussion 2 (Post by Day 5, Respond by Day 7) o Please provide your three most important take-aways from the course. How do you think these will allow us to go from today’s achievements and challenges to what is envisioned in 2050? Post your response to the discussion which is accessible through the Discussion Board tab located on the left-hand navigation panel. 5 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Field Project Executive Summary and Presentations Field Project Executive Summary (Submit by end of Day 7) Value: 100 Points For a few words related to your final project, please click on Professor Solomon's final podcast. Log in to the course to access audio file and alternative version. Transcript The group field projects may vary between analyses of supply chain problems that a company needs to solve and library research studies. For "real world" projects, you may want to consider various projects you are or have been involved in at different companies. Overall, you must be very selective in choosing an interesting but doable project. Such a field study should involve an analysis of a certain supply chain problem related to sustainability, e.g., excessive inventory and its impact on sustainability, and a realistic solution to the problem. Your report would then consist of a brief description of the company and the industry environment in which it competes, the problem you are analyzing, the supporting (data) analyses, and your recommendations. If you choose to undertake a library research project, a list, by no means comprehensive, of potential topics is given below:       Development of collaborative alliances with vendors toward sustainable practices. EBusiness impact on sustainable supply chain practices. Global supply chain coordination leading to sustainable practices. Outsourcing – Can it lead to sustainable practices? Reverse and/or Green Logistics - How can companies improve them further? Sustainability in the supply chain – What companies have done right/wrong. Technology in the supply chain (e.g., RFID) - Can it help sustainable practices? This major assignment consists of an executive summary page, at least six and at most eight pages of text, plus additional exhibit pages. You must submit this document in MS Word Format to the Turnitin drop box in the Assignment section of the course no later than Day 7. Lastly, thank you for being concerned about our wellbeing and that of all generations to come after us. Please remember, reduce, reuse and recycle. 6 SCHM 6221: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management Field Project Presentations (Submit by end of Day 7) Value: 100 Points Each group will also be required to make a 10-12 minute presentation of their field project. The use of PowerPoint, or any other preferred multimedia tools that you feel best capture the essence of the project (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), is strongly suggested. Once you have created your presentation, you will be expected to start a thread in the associated discussion board and share the link/file of your project. You are also encouraged to view the projects of your classmates and enter your thoughts into the thread where appropriate. 7 www.hbr.org S POTLIGHT : R ADICALLY R EINVENT Y OUR S UPPLY C HAIN Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? Reprint R1010G 245 S POTLIGHT : R ADICALLY R EINVENT Y OUR S UPPLY C HAIN Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? COPYRIGHT © 2010 HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Managers looking to improve the social and environmental impacts of their supply chains say they feel blocked by forces beyond their control. Members of the HBR Advisory Council (a group of readers we periodically turn to for insights) told us that efforts to boost the sustainability of supply chains are hampered by cost, complexity, lack of information and know-how, and the sense that customers and investors are not deeply concerned about the issue. Of 335 respondents, 79% have direct or indirect managerial oversight of their company’s supply chain. Those surveyed focused mainly on financial factors. This may be largely a response to the weak economy. It also shows that companies aren’t convinced by academics, consultants, and others who argue that improving sustainability won’t necessarily cut into profits, and may in fact help the bottom line. harvard business review • october 2010 How confident are you that you understand the sustainability performance of your suppliers? Here’s how our respondents answered: EXTREMELY OR VERY CONFIDENT... IN INTERNAL SUPPLIERS IN FIRST IER SUPPLIERS IN SECON TIER SUPPLIERS IN THIR TIER SUPPLIERS page 1 246 Is Your Supply Chain Sustainable? • S POTLIGHT : R ADICALLY R EINVENT Y OUR S UPPLY C HAIN Which sustainability performance issues most concern your company? IMPORTANCE OF ISSUE HIGH All cost and financial concerns Lack of interest from stakeholders (employees and clients) Regulatory compliance No way to measure impact Current economic realities; the need to run lean Potential risks for brand and reputation Managing the life cycle and cumulative environmental impacts LOW HIGH FREQUENCY OF RESPONSE What hinders sustainability innovation in your supply chain? HIGH All cost and financial concerns IMPORTANCE OF ISSUE Focused on morepressing priorities Limited resources Uncertain ROI Insuffi cient supplier understanding and buy-in LOW HIGH FREQUENCY OF RESPONSE 54% of those surveyed say that their company is extremely or very concerned about its sustainability performance. At the same time, only 40% believe that their external stakeholders are extremely or very concerned. Reprint R1010G To order, call 800-988-0886 or 617-783-7500 or go to www.hbr.org harvard business review • october 2010 page 2 247 To Order For Harvard Business Review reprints and subscriptions, call 800-988-0886 or 617-783-7500. Go to www.hbr.org For customized and quantity orders of Harvard Business Review article reprints, call 617-783-7626, or e-mail customizations@hbsp.harvard.edu www.hbr.org U.S. and Canada 800-988-0886 617-783-7500 617-783-755 5 fax 248 DECEMBER 2011 REPRINT R1112H HBR.ORG Don’t Let Your Supply Chain Control Your Business Manufacturers are delegating too much power to top-tier suppliers, undermining their own ability to innovate, cut costs, and manage risk. by Thomas Choi and Tom Linton 249 Don’t Let Your Supply Chain Control Your Business Manufacturers are delegating too much power to top-tier suppliers, undermining their own ability to innovate, cut costs, and manage risk. by Thomas Choi and Tom Linton 2 Harvard Business Review December 2011 250 FOR ARTICLE REPRINTS CALL 800-988-0886 OR 617-783-7500, OR VISIT HBR.ORG I ILLUSTRATION: BRETT RYDER n the past 25 years, major originalequipment manufacturers around the world have shifted to the Ja pa- nese tiered approach to supply chains. They’ve radically reduced the number of suppliers that they directly manage and off-loaded responsibility for supervising the rest, along with the task of building major subsystems, to a handful of firsttier suppliers. The attractions for OEMs were faster new-product introductions, larger volume discounts, reductions in the capital and risks associated with developing and producing the subsystems, and the ability to spend less management time on overseeing the multitude of lower-tier suppliers and more on building core competencies. But we believe that the delegation has gone too far. Our conclusion is based on studies of the practices at some 20 leading multinational corporations that one of us (Thomas Choi) conducted and the longtime experience that the other (Tom Linton) has had as a purchasing executive at such companies as LG Electronics (LGE), Agere Systems, Freescale Semiconductor, and IBM. We discovered that a heavy reliance on first-tier suppliers is dangerous for OEMs. It weakens their control over costs, reduces their ability to stay on top of technology developments and shifts in demand, and makes it difficult to ensure that their suppliers are operating in a socially and environmentally sustainable fashion. The remedy is for OEMs to forge direct relationships with a select number of lower-tier suppliers, and in this article, we’ll explain how. The Dangers But first, let’s look at the risks of giving top-tier suppliers too much responsibility. Less control over costs. Managers of large OEMs assume that they can save money by outsourcing the design and production of major supply subsystems. But here’s what happens when a company delegates considerable control over a product’s bill of materials: The total costs of ownership of the product (including such things as transportation and inventory management) become opaque to the OEM. And, as some manufacturers found out the hard way during the recent recession, that means the company has little leverage to reduce costs—especially if it has handed over an entire subsystem to a single supplier and can’t quickly stage a competition or switch suppliers. December 2011 Harvard Business Review 3 251 DON’T LET YOUR SUPPLY CHAIN CONTROL YOUR BUSINESS demand for semiconductors was about to rebound. (Read on for more about that.) Less control over sustainability. Environmentally and socially sensitive consumers are increasingly holding manufacturers accountable for the performance of their individual suppliers. (See “Don’t Tweak Your Supply Chain—Rethink It End to End,” HBR October 2010.) For example, the massive contamination of the Pearl River Delta area in China by suppliers to the denim industry had the potential to damage the image of Western apparel makers, and suicides at a Chinese contract manufacturer used by Dell, Hewlett-Packard, and Apple could have tainted those companies’ brands. As technology makes the supply chain much more transparent to end customers (see “The Transparent Supply Chain,” Managers also need to factor in various hidden costs. One is the resources and time required to investigate and resolve problems rooted in lower-tier suppliers. Another is quality. Honda of America learned that when it allowed top-tier suppliers to select their own vendors of plastic parts, the textures and colors of the parts often didn’t match, because their makers bought resins from different companies. Less visibility into technology developments. Lower-tier suppliers can provide valuable information about the latest manufacturing advances and technological innovations. In consumer electronics, for example, having direct access to the newest ideas of chip-design houses, which often are second- or third-tier suppliers, is critical. Such access has enabled companies like Apple and LGE to influence the development of emerging technologies, incorporate them into products before their rivals do, and secure supplies at an advantageous price. Conversely, companies that lack such access have found themselves reacting to competitors’ innovations and struggling to match their features and prices. We have seen the same pattern in other industries, including aerospace, automobiles, and telecommunications-network equipment. Less access to market information. Lowertier suppliers that serve a number of markets sometimes spot shifts in the economy early. OEMs that don’t have close relationships with such suppliers can miss opportunities to adjust orders and lock in favorable prices for parts and materials, losing ground to more-astute competitors. This happened in the consumer electronics industry in early 2009, when a number of companies didn’t realize that 4 Harvard Business Review December 2011 252 HBR October 2010), more and more companies will face the fallout from their suppliers’ misbehavior. Many OEMs incorrectly believe that creating an approved vendor list (of the companies from which top-tier suppliers are supposed to buy parts and materials) will protect them from the dangers described above. But this common practice poses potential problems. First, ensuring that top-tier suppliers abide by the list is easier said than done. They will naturally look for ways to depart from the list when it’s in their interest—for example, if they can boost their profits by getting a better price from another subcontractor or can obtain a volume discount by pooling orders from several OEM customers. What’s more, having a comprehensive approved vendor list can make it easier for a top-tier supplier to build a business that competes with its OEM customer. But in our view, not having a list poses bigger risks. Left to their own devices, top-tier suppliers will likely keep most if not all of the cost savings they wring from the lower tiers. In addition, the lack of a list can make it much more difficult for an OEM to switch top-tier suppliers. The OEM would then be changing not just the one company but the entire supply chain beyond that firm. Also, when OEMs don’t have an approved vendor list, the loyalty of the subcontractors typically shifts to the top-tier supplier. Even with an approved vendor list, an OEM may put itself at risk if it delegates the management of lower-tier vendors to the top-tier supplier—as a large aerospace manufacturer discovered when it stopped buying raw material directly for one of its top-tier suppliers. That supplier then developed FOR ARTICLE REPRINTS CALL 800-988-0886 OR 617-783-7500, OR VISIT HBR.ORG Idea in Brief Big original-equipment manufacturers have gone too far in delegating management of lower-tier vendors to top-tier suppliers. By doing so, OEMs have weakened their The remedy: OEMs should selectively re- control over costs, reduced their ability to stay on top of technology developments and shifts in demand, and made it more difficult to ensure that suppliers are operating in a establish direct relationships with lower-tier suppliers. These include suppliers that have the most significant impact on the total cost sustainable fashion. a close relationship with the raw-material vendor. When the aerospace company wanted to switch to a new top-tier supplier and asked a prospective candidate to submit a proposal, the candidate contacted the raw-material vendor for a price quote, and the vendor leaked word to the incumbent top-tier supplier. The result: The incumbent purposely kept its inventory of finished parts for the aerospace manufacturer so low that the manufacturer couldn’t make the transition to a different supplier. So what’s the answer? An OEM should have a list, be vigilant about getting suppliers to abide by it as much as possible, and directly manage relationships with select lower-tier suppliers itself. How to Choose Best-practice companies such as Apple, Dell, HP, Honda, IBM, LGE, and Toyota do what we just advised: They have approved vendor lists but never completely relinquish decisions about a product’s components and materials to top-tier suppliers. They carefully determine which items they should directly source themselves and which they should totally delegate. Here are some guidelines: Retain control over items that have the most significant impact on the total cost of goods sold. Typically, 20% of the items on the list of a product’s parts and materials—the bill of materials, or BOM—account for 80% of the total cost. A standard mobile phone, for example, contains two or three semiconductors and an LCD screen that represent more than 50% of its total BOM cost. Usually, even a 1% reduction ...
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Running head: WEEK 5 DISCUSSION 1 SUPPLY CHAIN

Week 5 Discussion 1 Supply Chain
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WEEK 5 DISCUSSION 1 SUPPLY CHAIN

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A major challenge with the majority of the corporation when it comes to utilizing
sustainable supply chain practices is in ensuring that supply chain meets the established
standards. In various ways, there exist challenges in the operating and planning a sustainable and
successful supply chain. As more and more companies continue turning to the supply chain
sustainability in order to earn a competitive advantage some challenges ought to be addressed on
sustainability. In an article published in Harvard Business Review titled “Why Sustainability Is
Now the Key Driver of Innovation” by Ram Nidumolu, C.K. Prahalad, and Rangaswami, t...

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