Humanities
Harvard University Interest Groups and Political Participation Questions

Harvard University

Question Description

I’m studying and need help with a Political Science question to help me learn.

just answer these questions 2-3 lines below, and make sure it makes sense, and if any questions asks about country or where i live its,

USA, California Los Angeles

and if you dont understand or confused about a question plz dont hesitate to text me

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Question 21: Why do people belong to interest groups Developing Your Skills Given your interests and political views, identify two interest groups in your community or state that you could join or become involved with (each should focus on the same one issue you care most about). The best way to find an interest group is to take advantage of numerous online lists. All you need to do is google the issue you’re interested in – like “gay rights” or “lower taxes” – along with “interest groups” and the state where you live. You’ll get lots of options to consider. Once you’ve done this preliminary search, answer the following questions: Question 1 of 6 What issue did you focus on? Question 2 of 6 List two groups that would provide you with an opportunity to work on the issue you care about. Question 3 of 6 How did you determine that each is potentially a good group for you? Were there others that also worked on the issue, but that you ruled out? Why? In answering this question, be specific about various purposive and selective benefits. Question 4 of 6 Describe the process for you to join or connect with both groups. Question 5 of 6 List three activities for each group that you’d be able to engage in if you became an active member. Question 6 of 6 Would you consider becoming an active member of either group? Why or why not? Question 22: Do young people want to run for office? Developing Your Skills Identify two elected positions – one at the local level and one at the state level – in the area where you live that you could imagine running for someday. You don’t have to think this is something you’ll actually do, but you should be clear on what you would need to do if you wanted to run for office. To choose the offices that most appeal to you, it’s probably helpful to look at the Secretary of States’ webpage in your state. As you will discover, some states and cities display this information clearly. Others, not so much. For each position, identify: • The title of the position • The length of the term • The next primary and general election dates • The process required to get your name on the ballot • The filing deadline (a specific date) for you to run in the next election • The salary Question 1 of 3 Local level elected position: Question 2 of 3 State level elected position: Question 3 of 3 Did you have any difficulty finding this information? Summarize how you conducted your search and where you looked. Why do you think this information might be so difficult to find? Question 23: Do people know anything about U.S. politics? Developing Your Skills A friend tells you that, without a doubt, U.S. Senator and former Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris was involved in a sex scandal. Your friend even shows you a headline from the internet: “BOMBSHELL: Sex Scandal Derails Kamala Harris.” You don’t know much about Senator Harris, but your friend’s allegations seem a little over the top. So you decide to investigate the story on your own. To determine whether it’s true: Question 1 of 3 Come up with three different search terms to track down the information you’ll need. Provide the exact wording of each search, along with the search engine you used. Question 2 of 3 List 5 different sources (the names of the websites or organizations that discuss the story) you encountered across the three searches. For each source, note whether there’s a lot, some, or no evidence of the Harris sex scandal. Question 3 of 3 Based on your research, is your friend well-informed, uninformed, or misinformed? Question 25: Why do you hear more about politicians’ sex scandals than the bills they propose? Developing Your Skills Even engaged citizens don’t always know how to follow the news in their communities. And once they figure out how to access local news, they still need to scroll through headlines and make choices about which stories to read. Are the news outlets in your community dramatic, or are they more like what we would expect in the golden age of journalism? In order to answer this question: Question 1 of 4 Go to the website of one local newspaper and one local TV station in the area where you live. Question 2 of 4 Identify the first three political stories you encounter on each site. Question 3 of 4 For each story, note whether the headline features negativity, conflict, or sensationalism. Some headlines will exhibit more than one of these characteristics. Question 4 of 4 Which source is the most negative? The most conflictual? The most sensational? Explain your answer by referring to specific headlines. Question 26: How do you know if you’re reading fake news? Developing Your Skills What kind of political information do the online versions of the most popular news sites offer? Consult these three websites to arrive at your answer: 1. Huffington Post (internet-based news source) 2. Fox News (cable TV news source) 3. NBC News (network TV news) Compile the following information for each site: Question 1 of 3 Identify a headline for a political story that follows the practices of authentic journalism. Question 2 of 3 Identify a headline for a political story that is commentary, not journalism. For each, note the author, that person’s background, and whether it’s ideological. Would you classify the commentary as balanced or ideological? Why? Question 3 of 3 Identify a political story on each site that a contemporary politician might claim is “fake news.” For each, explain why he or she might do that. Question 27: Why do Fox News and CNN viewers see politics so differently? Developing Your Skills Imagine that you’re a journalist applying for a job to write for CNN, the New York Times news pages, and Fox News. You have to demonstrate that you can frame a controversial issue in a way that’s consistent with each news organization’s standard approach. Although each outlet would probably consider itself objective and unbiased, for the purposes of this exercise, you should follow the classifications offered in this segment: CNN is liberal, the New York Times is neutral, and Fox News is conservative. First, choose one of the following: (1) the threat of climate change (2) a ban on assault weapons (3) building a wall on the southern border Now, for the topic you choose: Question 1 of 2 Develop three headlines for your story – one liberal, one neutral, one conservative. The headlines should clearly identify the frame you would want readers to use in considering the issue you’re covering. Your headlines can be up to 15 words. Question 2 of 2 Draft a chyron for a segment about the story – again, one liberal, one neutral, one conservative. Each chyron should be no longer than six words. In total, you’ll be drafting three headlines and three chyrons. | Question 29: Is there too much money in elections? Developing Your Skills Open Secrets is a great website that tracks campaign contributions to federal candidates. Based on the information provided, choose one of your home state senators and assess his or her “campaign committee’s” fundraising profile. More specifically answer the following questions, some of which require you to do some basic calculations: Question 1 of 6 What senator did you choose? What state is the senator from? And when was his or her last election? Question 2 of 6 How much money did the senator raise in his or her most recent election? Question 3 of 6 What percentage of the senator’s money came from (1) small contributions, (2) large contributions, and (3) PACs? Question 4 of 6 Identify the top five industries contributing to the senator. Question 5 of 6 What percentage of the senator’s total funds came from these top five industries? Question 6 of 6 Did the of your senator raise more, about the same, or less than the average U.S. senator? By how much? Question 31: What is the Electoral College anyway? Developing Your Skills One criticism of the Electoral College is that it depresses voter turnout in states that are not competitive. In other words, in states that always vote either Republican or Democrat, voters are less likely to show up at the polls because the outcome in their state is a foregone conclusion. If true, this would serve as a solid piece of evidence to support an argument against the Electoral College. But is it true? Assemble evidence from the 2016 general election to decide. More specifically: ▲ Question 1 of 5 Before you assemble any evidence, state why this criticism, if true, would be bad for democracy. Question 2 of 5 Now, select three safe Republican states and get the voter turnout rate for each in 2016. You can find turnout statistics on all 50 states at the United States Election Project website. Question 3 of 5 Select three safe Democratic states and get the voter turnout rate for each in 2016. Question 5 of 5 Select three swing states (you can find these in Figure 2) and get the voter turnout rate for each in 2016. Question 6 of 5 Do these data provide evidence that the Electoral College depresses turnout in non-swing states? Explain how you arrived at your answer. Question 32: How do you run for president? Developing Your Skills To win the presidency you need to win 270 electoral votes. Take a look at the map in Figure 2 and answer the following questions: Question 1 of 3 From the outset, the Democrats have 182 electoral votes (dark blue states). Identify two different lists of swing states (this includes light blue and brown states) the Democrats could win to get to 270. Show how the lists get the Democrats to 270. Question 2 of 3 The Republicans start out with 164 votes electoral votes (red states). Identify two different lists of swing states (this includes pink and brown states) the Republicans could win to get to 270. Show how the lists get the Republicans to 270. Question 3 of 3 Is there a scenario where the candidates could tie at 269-269? Explain how you arrived at your answer, referencing specific states and electoral vote allocations. Question 33: If everyone hates Congress, why do so many members get reelected? Developing Your Skills Figuring it out header text Question 1 of 5 Identify your congressional district and the member of Congress who represents you. If you’re not sure, you can find out here. All you need to do is enter your address. Question 2 of 5 Find a map of your district (again, you can do it here). Based on the content of this segment, does your district look like it’s the result of partisan gerrymandering? Explain how you arrived at your answer, and refer specifically to a map of the district. Question 3 of 5 How effective a legislator is your member of Congress compared to other members from the state? If you live in a state with only one member, then compare your representative to those in a neighboring state. This information is available at the website for the Center for Effective Lawmaking. Question 4 of 5 How active is your member with constituent service in the district? Their websites typically provide a sense of how easy it is for constituents to contact them and the types of community events they hold . Question 5 of 5 How much money did your member of Congress raise in his or her last campaign? Was it more or less than the opponent? By how much? This information is available at Open Secrets. Question 34: Are third parties doomed to fail in the United States? Developing Your Skills Lots of third parties emerge, but few succeed. Now that you’re familiar with the procedural and ideological obstacles third parties face, develop a blueprint for a third party that might actually have a chance in contemporary U.S. elections. To do this, you can come up with a completely new idea for a third party or modify one that already exists. More specifically: Question 1 of 5 Give your party a name. Question 2 of 5 In one sentence, summarize your party’s central purpose. Question 3 of 5 List up to three policy positions the party will advocate. Question 4 of 5 Identify three reasons your party might actually succeed when so many others fail. Be specific in providing evidence for your argument. Question 5 of 5 Now identify three obstacles your party faces. Again, provide specific details to back up your claims. ...
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Final Answer

Hello. I am through with the paper, I passed it through grammarly to ensure that grammar is perfect and also turnitin for plagiarism. The paper is good now. However, you can contact me in case you want anything more. pleasure working with you. goodbye

Running Head: US POLITICS

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US POLITICS
Name of Student
School name
Date of Submission

US POLITICS

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Question 21: Why do people belong to interest groups

Developing Your Skills
Given your interests and political views, identify two interest groups in your community
or state that you could join or become involved with (each should focus on the same
one issue you care most about). The best way to find an interest group is to take
advantage of numerous online lists. All you need to do is google the issue you’re
interested in – like “gay rights” or “lower taxes” – along with “interest groups” and the
state where you live. You’ll get lots of options to consider. Once you’ve done this
preliminary search, answer the following questions:
Question 1 of 6
What issue did you focus on?
I focused on political participation. This requires people to elect leaders that they want.

Question 2 of 6
List two groups that would provide you with an opportunity to work on the issue you care about.
National Organization of women and Lawmakers

Question 3 of 6
How did you determine that each is potentially a good group for you? Were there others that also
worked on the issue, but that you ruled out? Why? In answering this question, be specific about
various purposive and selective benefits.
The above groups can attract people with full political passion. Some groups could work on this
issue but I ruled them out because they are less politically Inclined, like LGBT groups.

Question 4 of 6
Describe the process for you to join or connect with both groups.
You need to be licensed by your trade union to connect with both groups. For instance lawyers
in bars association

Question 5 of 6
List three activities for each group that you’d be able to engage in if you become an active
member.
Lawmakers' activities include; mobilizing people, educating people of their rights and
influencing citizens to vote wisely.

US POLITICS

3

The national organization of women; mobilizing women across the country, educating women,
fighting for the rights of women in the society

Question 6 of 6
Would you consider becoming an active member of either group? Why or why not?
I would consider becoming a member of each group as It will make me politically active. I will
be able to know my rights and fight for them.

Question 22: Do young people want to run for
office?
Developing Your Skills
Identify two elected positions – one at the local level and one at the state level
– in the area where you live that you could imagine running for someday. You
don’t have to think this is something you’ll do, but you should be clear on what
you would need to do if you wanted to run for office. To choose the offices that
most appeal to you, it’s probably helpful to look at the Secretary of States’
webpage in your state. As you will discover, some states and cities display
this information. Others, not so much. For each position, identity:
• The title of the position
• The length of the term
• The next primary and general election dates
• The process required to get your name on the ballot
• The filing deadline (a specific date) for you to run in the next election
• The salary
Question 1 of 3

Local-level elected position:
Mayor. The mayor is elected to a term of four years. The next elections are set to be conducted
on 3rd November 2020. He or she should have a campaign distribution account. The filing fee
should be more than $952.91. A mayor is paid $174,258 plus an annual supplement of $3048

US POLITICS

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Question 2 of 3

S...

University of Virginia

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