Law
JRN 4425 Troy University Media Law Speech Draft

JRN 4425

Troy University

JRN

Question Description

I’m stuck on a Law question and need an explanation.

Case: Curtis Publishing V. Butts (1966)

The Group Assignment

Each group of 4-6 students will present a summary of the case assigned to it. Your group

is teaching this case to the class. The minimum time of the presentation will be 20 minutes, and

the maximum time will be 25 minutes, thereby leaving a minimum of 5 minutes additional for

class questions. The time will be strictly monitored. Each group member will speak for a

minimum of 3 minutes. Obviously, this means that some group members will speak for more

than 3 minutes.

And my part of this presentation is:

Events leading up to the incident/behavior in question; in other words, set it up for the

audience; use photos as well as text.

I need a speech draft around 3:30 minutes,about 500 words. And this speech raft should have an outline.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Schedule for JRN 4425 Group Presentations—Worth 450 pts. I will give you some time during class on Tuesday, March 3 to meet. Decide who the group leader will be. Exchange emails, and set up your first real meeting. Date Presenters Team Case 3/24 (Tues.) Brooks, Jaylin Ding, Boyan Jackson, Garrett Wang, Anna Zhang, Yuting Shi, Zhou 1 3/24 (Tues.) Campbell, Emily Feng, Ziheng Jiang, Yifei Prince, Jessica Williams, Greyson Zhao, Jienan 2 3/26 (Thurs.) Chen, Lu Ferguson, Dorvell Liu, Zhuyun Xu, Jiandong Zheng, Yanran Parker, Baylen 3 3/26 (Thurs.) Cooper, Hanna Granville, Samuel Luo, Ziqi Yang, Jieyu Zhu, Ling Zhu, Tongtong 4 Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc. (1974) 3/31 (Tues.) Deng, Wenjuan Hatfield, Laurel Martin, Maya Tang, Jixuan Zhang, Xinyu Smith, Madelyn 5 Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier (1988) New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964) Curtis Publishing v. Butts (1966) New York Times Co. v. United States (1971) [The Pentagon Papers Case] Instructions appear on the next page!! 2 The Group Assignment Each group of 4-6 students will present a summary of the case assigned to it. Your group is teaching this case to the class. The minimum time of the presentation will be 20 minutes, and the maximum time will be 25 minutes, thereby leaving a minimum of 5 minutes additional for class questions. The time will be strictly monitored. Each group member will speak for a minimum of 3 minutes. Obviously, this means that some group members will speak for more than 3 minutes. The following topics regarding each case must be addressed at some point during the presentation: Events leading up to the incident/behavior in question; in other words, set it up for the audience; use photos as well as text Who brought the case initially, why, and in which court? The initial decision and the reasoning behind it; which prior cases were used as guidance (precedents) The progression of the case and in which courts, giving the decision(s) and the reasoning behind them as it traveled through the justice system An educated opinion from the members of the group: How many agree with the final decision and how many disagree—and why? What are the implications of this decision? The final slide should be a bibliography of your references. Wikipedia will not count as a reference. Bring a handout to give to each classmate AFTER the presentation. It need not be more than a one-page outline of the presentation, including important details/points. The PowerPoint MUST be e-mailed to Dr. Sarapin at least three (3) days prior to your presentation day. Ten percent (10%) will be deducted if I do not receive your presentations at least three days prior to your presentation. No online presentations, please, such as Prezi. You may use note cards, but you may not read from a script. Know your case, and anticipate the questions you will get. Each person should be able to answer any question! The students in the audience will be responsible for asking questions. Each student should have at least one question prepared for the Q-and-A period. Not everyone will be able to ask a question, but each student should ask at least one question in one of the 6 presentations. The presenting groups should come to class early enough for both groups to get on the computer and make sure their PowerPoints are working properly BEFORE CLASS BEGINS!! There won’t be any time for “finding” PPTs. You will begin on time and end on time. Have a Plan A, a Plan B, and a Plan C. E-mail your presentation to your own e-mail address, bring it on a thumb drive, and bring it on a second thumb drive. There will be no time between presentations to wait for a group to get its act together. All participants must be ready to go. What makes an average presentation (“C” work) into an “A” presentation will be the inclusion of material in addition to the points I’ve listed above. If you’re presenting a Supreme Court case, tell us who was on that court and what the liberal-conservative make-up was. Do you think the justices’ political views affected the decision? What interesting quotes came out of the text of the decision. Do something or ask a question that engages the audience’s participation in the discussion! You must use a PowerPoint presentation that will be posted to Canvas for the class to study. ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Media law Speech Draft Outline


Libel cases happen when a person makes a false statement or shares false information
about another person that harms their reputation and must be published.



A person sues a media publication company for publishing defamatory information that is
not accurate or without making attempts to confirm the information.



New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964) holds that
o A public official suing a publisher must prove that a statement was made with the
awareness that it was false or not bothering to ensure it was fake or not.



Curtis Publishing Company published an article on March 23, 1963, The Saturday
Evening Post making an impression that there was a football match fix.



Butts a coach at University of Georgia, conspired with Paul Bear Bryant, a coach at the
University of Alabama, to fix match in favor of Alabama in 1962.



The information published by Curtis Publishing Co. in the post was considered as libel
based on the New York Times Co. v. ...

chriss200 (7947)
UC Berkeley

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