Writing
Organization Transformational Plan Highlights Key Challenges Faced Paper

Question Description

I’m studying for my Management class and need an explanation.

16 – 18 pages

An organization transformation plan informs the readers of the status of the organization, highlights key challenges faced (be it internal or external factors), and proposes change recommendations that are substantiated by empirical research.

The purpose of this assignment is to apply the lessons learned in your program to address organization challenges.

Upon successfully completing this assignment, you should be able to:

1.Describe an organization’s current status and frame the description in a relevant context: history, market, industry, etc.

2.Identify key organizational challenges (specifically associated with innovation adoption and/or diffusion)

3.Identify key intervention points where adjustments can be made to address organizational issues.

4.Propose specific interventions to address organizational change

a.Interventions could include but are not limited to policies, organizational structure, physical infrastructure, communication networks, etc

b.Intervention recommendations should be substantiated with research

5.Identify and describe individual positionality and possible biases in analysis

6.Integrate finding from literature review assignment (due week 5)

7.Present findings in a written report and oral presentation

It is recommended that you use an organization you are intimately familiar with, the music industry, record company. You may decide to modify names of stakeholders and organizations to protect the anonymity and confidentiality of subjects and organizations.

**In this case we will modify the name of the music record label to X Music

Recommended Outline

Introduction

•Purpose and goals

•Organization summary

•Positionality statement

oDescription of your role (marketing) in the organization and disclosure of potential biases stemming from your experiences

Challenges

  • Description of challenges (framed in literature)
  • Identification of key stakeholders, processes, obstacles

Recommendations

•Identification of critical and high leverage intervention points

•Specific recommendations for improvements (minimum of 2)

•Success measures (how will you measure the impact of your recommendations)

Conclusion

•Summary of key ideas

•Identification of obstacles and challenges to implementation of recommendations

•Recommendations for barriers reduction and obstacle mitigation

•Description of your preferred role in the implementation of the proposed solutions

It is also recommended that you develop an outline of key ideas and theories you are seeking to explore as well as phenomena you are seeking to observe and investigate, prior to engaging in the writing of this assignment

READING

HBR article and review the Boston Consulting Group site

https://hbr.org/2005/10/the-hard-side-of-change-management

https://dice.bcg.com/#intro

McKinsey 7S Framework Explained

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFNJypMOIMI&feature=youtu.be

https://www.ocai-online.com/about-the-Organizational-Culture-Assessment-Instrument-OCAI

Poole, M. S., & Ven, A. H. (2004). Handbook of Organizational Change and Innovation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press (attached)

Burnes, B. (1996). No Such Thing as... a "One Best Way" to Manage Organizational Change. Management Decision, 34(10), 11-18. (attached)

Homan, T. (2017 July 14th). TEDx Talks: The inner side of Organizational Change. (Video File). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n-c6iAKFgg#action=share

Back to the Future: Revisiting Kotter’s 1996 Change Model (attached)


Appelbaum, S.H., Habashy, S., Malo, J.L., & Shafiq, H. (2012).
Back to the Future: Revisiting Kotter's 1996 Change Model.
Journal of Management Development, 31(8), 764-782.

The Eigth ‘S’s of Successful Strategy Execution (attached)

Higgins, J.M. (2005).
The Eight 'S's of Successful Strategy Execution.
Journal of Change Management, 5(1), 3-13.

Readings: Merits and Limits of Org. Change

The readings for this week will help you explore the individual and group dimensions of organizational change. The Eilam & Shamir article provides a powerful illustration of the influence of organizational change on the individual through a powerful case study.

This link with take you to an article What Science Can Tell Us About Building Great Teams: https://insight.kellogg.northwestern.edu/building-leading-great-teams-research

Some References

Leyshon, A. (2014). On the Reproduction of the Musical Economy after the Internet. Reformatted, 80-109. doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572410.003.0004

Weick, K.E., & Quinn, R.E. (1999). Organizational Change and Development. Annual Review of Psychology, 50(1), 361-386

Wikström, P., & DeFillippi, R. (2016). Business Innovation and Disruption in the Music Industry. Gloucestershire, NY: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Stebbings, H., & Braganza, A. (2009). Exploring Continuous Organizational Transformation: Morphing through Network Interdependence. Journal of Change Management, 9(1), 27-48. doi:10.1080/14697010902727161. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/openview/6d53c46999808886f05dc4d19389b307/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

Uphoff, T. (2015). What Can You Learn from Google's Reorganization? Retrieved from https://www.business.com/articles/what-can-you-learn-from-googles-reorganization/

Wee, E. X., & Taylor, M. S. (2018). Attention to change: A multilevel theory on the process of emergent continuous organizational change. Journal of Applied Psychology, 103(1), 1-13. doi:10.1037/apl0000261. Retrieved from https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2017-42045-001

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Central Issues in the Study of Change and Innovation Copyright 2004. Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Marshall Scott Poole The chapter is organized around the three questions. The next section discusses three viewpoints on the nature of change and innovation and considers how some of the theories discussed in this handbook fit with them. Each of the three perspectives focuses on different aspects of change and innovation and suggests different ways of distinguishing among theories of these phenomena. We then turn to paradigms for the study of change and innovation. Three approaches—variance research, process research, and modeling—are distinguished in terms of what they can tell us about change and innovation, the type of explanation they offer, and the general research methodology they employ. In the third section we consider key facets of organizational change and innovation theories—agency, levels of analysis, and time. These three terms are common touchstones for theory development in this area. We delineate recent trends and advances with respect to the three facets and suggest some possible trajectories for future development. The chapter concludes with a discussion of worthwhile directions suggested by some theoretical voices not heard in this volume. This handbook is a rich tapestry of theories, its warp the levels of analysis from individual to nation-state and its weft the time through which change and innovation processes unfold. As with many tapestries, what first strikes the eye is the amazing diversity of ideas and subject matter. But as we step back and look a little longer, patterns and central themes emerge. These patterns are the subject of this chapter. Across the diverse and wide-ranging contributions to this handbook three basic questions consistently present themselves: What is the nature of change? How should we study change and innovation? What are the key concepts a theory of change and innovation should incorporate? This chapter will explore various answers to these questions and consider their implications for future research on organizational change and innovation. It will also attempt to illuminate various theories in this book and their relationship to one another by identifying their positions on these questions. 3 EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 3/6/2020 10:04 PM via JOHNSON & WALES UNIV AN: 138144 ; Poole, Marshall Scott, Van de Ven, Andrew H..; Handbook of Organizational Change and Innovation Account: s9006562.main.ehost 4 HANDBOOK OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND INNOVATION What Is the Nature of Change? How one answers this question defines how one divides the field of organizational change and innovation theories. Taking a position on the nature of change requires the theorist to focus on some aspects of change and innovation and to divert attention from others. Change is such a multifaceted phenomenon that every attempt is necessarily limited, but by piecing together partial views, a broader understanding may emerge. In this section we will consider three answers to the question ‘‘What is the nature of change?’’ each of which focuses on particular aspects of change and innovation. While none is complete in itself, together they suggest some of the dimensions that ought to be addressed in theories of change and innovation. Theories of Change Versus Theories of Changing Crucial to defining change and innovation is delineating the role of people in these processes. To this end Bennis’s (1966) distinction between theories of change, which focus on how organizations change and factors that produce change, and theories of changing, which focus on how change can be brought about and managed in organizations, is useful. This distinction highlights the role of human agency in organizational change and innovation in terms of the contrast between planned and unplanned change discussed by Seo et al. in chapter 4. Planned change is consciously conceived and implemented by knowledgeable actors, and how planned change may be effectively accomplished is explained in theories of changing. There is a normative cast to planned change; planned change attempts to improve the situation and has as its reference point a desired end state. By contrast, unplanned change may or may not be driven by human choice. It is not purposefully conceived and may move the organization in either desirable or undesirable directions. The contrast between planned and unplanned change focuses our attention on the degree to which change and innovation can be choreographed, scripted, or controlled. Theories of planned change specify ways to manage and control change processes. Theories of unplanned change, on the other hand, imply that change is to some degree a force in its own right, susceptible to channeling, but not necessarily to control or management. While planned and unplanned change may be viewed as opposite ends of a continuum, it is also useful to consider them together. All planned change occurs in the context of the ambient change processes that occur naturally in organizations. For example, a strategic planning process occurs in an organization that is going through its own life cycle and also evolving as part of a population of other organizations. The intersection of these three change processes, one planned and the other two unplanned, will shape the organization, and knowledge of the ambient change processes can enable the managers to conduct strategic planning more effectively. Conversely, unplanned change processes can be ‘‘domesticated’’ through interventions and driven in useful directions. In order to do this, the planner makes a virtue of necessity. Drawing on his or her knowledge of how natural change processes unfold, the planner uses the processes’ momentum to push through needed measures. Most theories discussed in this book are best classified as theories of change, including McGrath and Tschan’s complex adaptive group theory (chapter 3), Baum and Rao’s coevolutionary theory (chapter 8), the various institutional theories discussed by Van de Ven and Hargrave (chapter 9), Lewin et al. (chapter 5), and Hinings et al. (chapter 10), the theories of culture change discussed by Hatch (chapter 7), and Dooley’s typology of complexity models (chapter 12). While they suggest some prescriptions for changing organizations, the theories themselves are not explicitly designed to advise change agents. The chapters primarily focused on changing are those by Woodman and Dewett on individual change (chapter 2) and Seo et al. on planned organizational change (chapter 4). Drazin et al.’s logics of organization (chapter 6) occupy an intermediate position, because the theories of logics are theories of change, but managers and change agents also utilize logics as targets or stimuli for the purpose of changing organizations. Theories of organizational change focus on change and innovation in their own right, seeking to understand them as objects of scientific study, rather than in practical terms. This approach has an advantage in that researchers are likely to cast a wider net if they seek to understand change and development per se than if they are focused on what works or doesn’t work or on management issues. The resulting theories and research are more likely to identify the most important factors and processes that shape change EBSCOhost - printed on 3/6/2020 10:04 PM via JOHNSON & WALES UNIV. All use subject to https://www.ebsco.com/terms-of-use CENTRAL ISSUES IN THE STUDY OF CHANGE AND INNOVATION and innovation and to avoid the blinders that sometimes accompany research primarily concerned with factors that can be managed or manipulated. As Pfeffer (1982, p. 37) put it, ‘‘adopting managerial definitions of what are important problems, what are the important variables, and sometimes even how to measure the variables may lead to neglect of important explanatory factors and to the phrasing of issues in ways that make them scientifically useless.’’ On this view a pure scholarly approach is most likely to generate useful insights. However, such wide-open inquiry may generate theories that have little direct connection with practice. The processes described in population ecology and institutional theories of change, for instance, would be difficult to control or manage. In populationlevel and institutional theories individual organizations and their members are, with few exceptions, portrayed as objects tossed about on an ocean with currents too powerful for them to resist. There are some lessons in this literature for reshaping and reacting to these currents, but for the most part they are more relevant to government policy makers and longterm strategists than to day-to-day managers. The primary advice is that managers and change agents should realize how difficult change and innovation are to script and manage, as these processes constantly move in unexpected directions and are driven by dynamics that are either too powerful to control or too subtle to understand. A valuable insight, perhaps, but hardly helpful to managers wondering how to manage organizational change and innovation. There is a pressing need to work out the implications of theories for the practice of organizational change and innovation. The lack of theories that translate into practical terms may be due, in part, to the emphasis of much recent research on macro level societal processes that occur in organizational fields and populations. This tends to direct attention away from human agency and factors that can be managed or engineered. The theories of active change in individuals (chapter 2), groups (chapter 3), and organizations (chapters 4, 6, and 9) may provide insights more easily turned to practice. Episodic Versus Continuous Change Weick and Quinn (1999) characterize change in terms of its tempo, defined as ‘‘characteristic rate, rhythm, or pattern of work or activity’’ (Random 5 House Dictionary, cited in Weick and Quinn 1999, p. 365). Based on tempo, they differentiate episodic and continuous change. Episodic change is conceived to be ‘‘infrequent, discontinuous and intentional’’ (p. 365), while continuous change is conceived as ‘‘ongoing, evolving and cumulative’’ (p. 375). The two forms of change are associated with different metaphors of the organization, analytical frameworks, theories of intervention, and roles attributed to change agents, as shown in table 1.1. The distinction between episodic and continuous change is correlated with several others, including incremental versus radical change (e.g.,Tushman et al. and Romanelli, 1985) continuous versus discontinuous change (e.g., Meyer, Goes, and Brooks, 1993), first-order versus secondorder change (Meyer et al., 1993) and competenceenhancing versus competence-destroying change (Abernathy and Clark, 1985). Theories in this volume that are episodic include:  Training and programmed change approaches to individual change discussed by Woodman and Dewett (chapter 2)  Punctuated equilibrium theory (discussed in several chapters)  Theories of organizational logics (chapter 6)  Most of the first and second generation theories of planned change discussed by Seo et al. (chapter 4)  Strategic choice theory (Lewin et al., chapter 5)  Evolutionary economics (chapter 5)  Schein’s theory of culture change (chapter 7)  Most of the institutional adaptation and collective action perspectives discussed by Van de Ven and Hargrave (chapter 9)  Greenwood et al.’s theory of institutional change in organizational fields (chapter 10) Theories that are continuous include:  The socialization and interpersonal interaction approaches to individual change (Woodman and Dewett, chapter 2)  The theory of learning organizations discussed by Seo et al. (chapter 4) and Lewin et al. (chapter 5)  Contingency theory (chapter 5)  Population and community ecology theories (Baum and Rao, chapter 8)  Hatch’s theory of culture change (chapter 7)  The institutional design and diffusion perspectives discussed by Van de Ven and Hargrave (chapter 9) EBSCOhost - printed on 3/6/2020 10:04 PM via JOHNSON & WALES UNIV. All use subject to https://www.ebsco.com/terms-of-use 6 HANDBOOK OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND INNOVATION Table 1.1 Comparison of episodic and continuous change Characteristic Episodic Change Continuous Change Metaphor of organization Organizations are inertia-prone and change is infrequent, discontinuous, and intentional. Organizations are emergent and self-organizing and change is constant, evolving, and cumulative. Analytic framework Change is an occasional interruption or divergence from equilibrium. It is externally driven. It is seen as a failure of the organization to adapt to a changing environment. Change is a pattern of endless modifications in work processes and social practice. It is driven by organizational instability and alert reactions to daily contingencies. Numerous small accomodations cumulate and multiply. Perspective: Micro, close, local Emphasis: Long-run adaptability Key concepts: recurrent interactions, response repertoires, emergent patterns, improvisation, translation, learning Perspective: Macro, distant, global Emphasis: Short-run adaptation Key concepts: Inertia, deep structure, or interrelated parts, triggering, replacement and substitution, discontinuity, revolution Intervention theory Intentional change: Unfreeze, change, refreeze. Change is inertial, linear, progressive, and requires outside intervention. Redirection of existing tendencies. Change is cyclical, processual, without an end state, equilibrium-seeking, eternal. Role of change agent Prime mover who creates change by finding points of leverage in organization. Change agent changes meaning systems, schema, and punctuation. Sense maker who redirects and shapes change. Change agent recognizes, makes salient, and reframes current patterns. Change agent unblocks improvisation, translation, and learning. Source: Adapted from table 1 in Weick and Quinn (1999). Some theories incorporate elements of both continuous and episodic change. The various stage theories of development described throughout the book generally emphasize continuous change at the micro level of system behavior, but stage changes are often conceptualized as episodic. McGrath and Tschan’s complex adaptive systems theory of groups also is built around both continuous and episodic elements. Moreover, some of the theories listed above, such as Greenwood et al.’s theory of institutional change, incorporate continuous change at the level of concrete action that moves the process through (episodic) stages. While the theory focuses on episodic, stagewise changes, it presumes an underlying continuous process of activity as a means for constructing the stages. That some theories fall somewhere in between the two types suggests that the distinction is not necessarily clear-cut. Since episodic change is best understood from a macro or global analysis, while continuous change is better discerned through micro level or local analysis, it has been suggested that they are not incompatible and that which perspective is applicable is a matter of perspective (see chapter 13). However, the fact that some changes appear to us to be gradual and almost indiscernible, whereas others are attended by major breaks and disruptions, continues to give the episodic-continuous distinction traction. Four Basic Motors of Change A third approach defines change in terms of the mechanisms that bring it about. Van de Ven and Poole (1995) defined four relatively simple theories that serve as ideal types for the explanation of change and innovation processes. Figure 1.1 shows that each theory views the process of development as unfolding in a fundamentally different progression of change events, and as governed by a different generative mechanism or motor.  A life-cycle model depicts the process of change in an entity as progressing through a necessary sequence of stages or phases. The specific content of these stages or phases is EBSCOhost - printed on 3/6/2020 10:04 PM via JOHNSON & WALES UNIV. All use subject to https://www.ebsco.com/terms-of-use CENTRAL ISSUES IN THE STUDY OF CHANGE AND INNOVATION 7 Figure 1.1 Typology of theories of change and innovation. Note: Arrows on lines represent likely sequences among events, not causation between events. Source: Van de Ven and Poole (1995). prescribed and regulated by an institutional, natural, or logical program prefigured at the beginning of the cycle.  A teleological model views development as a cycle of goal formulation, implementation, evaluation, and modification of actions or goals based on what was learned or intended by the entity. This sequence emerges through the purposeful enactment or social construction of an envisioned end state among individuals within the entity.  In dialectical models of development conflicts emerge between entities espousing an opposing thesis and antithesis that collide to produce a synthesis, which in time becomes the thesis for the next cycle of a dialectical progression. Confrontation and conflict between opposing entities generate this dialectical cycle.  An evolutionary model of development consists of a repetitive sequence of variation, selection, and retention events among entities in a designated population. This evolutionary cycle is generated by competition for scarce environmental resources between entities inhabiting a population. The four theories can be distinguished along two dimensions. The unit of change dimension indexes whether the change in question is premised on the actions of a single entity or multiple entities. Evolutionary and dialectical theories operate on multiple entities. Evolutionary forces are defined in terms of their impacts on populations and have no meaning at the level of the individual entity. Dialectical theories require at least two entities to fill the roles of thesis and antithesis. On the other hand, life cycle and teleological theories operate on a single entity. In the case of a life-cycle model, development is explained as a function of potentials immanent within the entity. While environment and other entities may shape how this immanence manifests itself, they are strictly secondary to the immanent potentials. The real push to development comes from within the single, whole developing entity. Teleological theories, too, require only a single entity’s goals, social construction, or envisioned end state to explain development. A teleological theory can operate among many members of an organization or a set of organizations when there is sufficient consensus among EBSCOhost - printed on 3/6/2020 10:04 PM via JOHNSON & WALES UNIV. All use subject to https://www.ebsco.com/terms-of-use 8 HANDBOOK OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND INNOVATION the members to permit them to act as a single organizational entity. The generative mechanisms of the four process theories also differ in terms of a second dimension regarding whether the sequence of change events is prescribed a priori or whether the progression is constructed and emerges as the change process unfolds. A prescribed mode of change channels the development of entities in a prespecified direction, typically of maintaining and incrementally adapting their forms in a definite, calculable way. A constructive mode of change generates unprecedented, novel forms that, in retrospect, are often discontinuous and unpredictable departures from the past. A prescribed motor evokes a sequence of change events in accord with a pre-established program or action routine. A constructive motor ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Final Answer

Attached.

Running head: ORGANIZATION TRANSFORMATION PLAN

Organization Transformational Plan
Name
Course
Date

1

ORGANIZATION TRANSFORMATIONAL PLAN

2

Table of Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3
Purpose and Goals........................................................................................................................... 4
Organization Summary ................................................................................................................... 5
Positionality statement ................................................................................................................ 7
Challenges ....................................................................................................................................... 8
High Employees Turnover ........................................................................................................ 10
Low investments in Marketing ................................................................................................. 11
Low Presence on Online Streaming Platforms ......................................................................... 12
Recommendations ......................................................................................................................... 13
Changing Organizational Culture (Continuous Approach to Change) ..................................... 13
Changing the Budgeting Approach (Episodic Change) ............................................................ 15
Success Measures...................................................................................................................... 16
Conclusion .................................................................................................................................... 18
References ..................................................................................................................................... 21

ORGANIZATION TRANSFORMATIONAL PLAN

3

Introduction
Like most other industries, the music industry has experienced tremendous changes
attributed to technological developments that have occurred in the past two decades. According
to Leyshon (2014), technological changes largely fueled by the development of the internet, and
the supporting technologies have changed how businesses operate and raise earn revenues from
music consumers. Describing the various challenges that the music industry currently
experiences, Nordgård (2018) note that piracy ranks as a major cause of concern with many
recording companies and musicians losing their traditional streams of income. Based on the
available data, billions of potential music earnings are being lost to piracy as new technologies
that facilitate this, and the disregard of acts of copyright infringement for geo-economic reasons
provides a safe environment for this to occur. As of the early 2000s, as much as 40 percent of all
CDs sold world-wide were pirate copies, with the largest markets being China, Russia, and
Brazil.
Other than piracy, the competitive landscape of the music industry has changed
significantly. With piracy leading to recording companies losing on their source of income, little
or no money flows back to them despite having funded the recording and marketing of the music
in the first place (Nordgård, 2018). This calls for businesses to adjust according to the changes
that have occurred in the industry so as to remain competitive and profitable. Cutting on nonessential costs was one of the responses that music recording companies undertook. Despite this,
these companies continue to face unprecedented issues that are hard to resolve without adopting
a company-wide approach to changes in how the entire company operates (Nordgård, 2018).
This calls for such companies to implement transformation processes that align them with the
current status of the market in which they compete. As an employee in the music industry

ORGANIZATION TRANSFORMATIONAL PLAN

4

working with X Music Recording company, the goal of this plan is to identify current challenges
that the company faces, recommend solutions to these challenges, and come up with a detail of
how these can be resolved.

Purpose and Goals
With the music recording industry increasingly becoming more competitive, there is a
need to come up with transformational changes that place the company towards success.
Transformation planning is the process of identifying a tactical plan for adjusting an
organization's business procedure through the adjustment of strategies and procedures. The aim
of organizational transformation is to empower organization participants to acclimate to the
availing mission and the available systems and to recognize any form of restrain to the changes
proposed to the organization. The fundamental aim of this transformation is to transfer
knowledge and the skills that help employees to accept the new vision and mission of the
organization. With this change, they are many shortcomings, this transformational disadvantages
from the resistance of change in the organization to the general mandate of culture and
leadership of the organization. Organizations always come up with transformation strategies.
These strategies include data-driven change, participative, and compliance-based. Leaders also
play a critical role in the transformation of organizations.
To help in the transformation process, and organizational transformation plan indicates
what the company needs to achieve and how this will be achieved. Additionally, the creation of
an organizational transition plan has played a key role in organizational transformation and
change. Therefore, transformational change in any organization is crucial and needs subtle
strategies to succeed in transforming any organization. In any organization, the framework for

ORGANIZATION TRANSFORMATIONAL PLAN

5

change involves quite a number of factors, and this is done in line with the policies and set the
goals of an organization. In the development of the strategies which will be used in
transformation, there are key issues that have to be taken into consideration right from the
leadership strategies to communication, amongst others. The development of these organization
transformation strategies involves the assessment of a number of sectors in the organization,
which include leadership, communication and stakeholder engagement, knowledge management,
enterprise organizational alignment, and site-level workforce transition.
While organizations undertake transformation initiatives for different purposes, change at
X Music is geared towards achieving the strategic goals developed at the company. Over the
years, X Music has grown significantly to become one of the most sought-after recording labels
in the city and across the state. Despite this, new recording companies have emerged and which
continues to compete aggressively against the company I work for. Currently, one of the major
challenges that the company is experiencing is the loss of talented and experienced employees to
these emerging competitors. A recent survey at X Music indicates an unsupportive culture
largely attributed to the loss of senior managers' support for the junior staff. Other than this, the
decline in revenues as a result of increasing competition and piracy remains a major concern for
all in the company. This makes it important to address these issues by undertaking a
transformational process that will see processes and procedures undertaken at the organization
help in achieving the overall strategic objectives.

Organization Summary
Over the years, the X Music recording company has grown to become one of the most
reputable music recording company in the state. The company has, over the years, gained a

ORGANIZATION TRANS...

CristinaP (13802)
Cornell University

Anonymous
Top quality work from this tutor! I’ll be back!

Anonymous
It’s my second time using SP and the work has been great back to back :) The one and only resource on the Interwebs for the work that needs to be done!

Anonymous
Thanks, good work

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4
Similar Questions
Related Tags