Writing
Walden University Therapeutic Relationships Discussion

Walden University

Question Description

Help me study for my Psychology class. I’m stuck and don’t understand.

A child's or adolescent's disruptive behaviors can be challenging for a counselor. Disruptive behaviors can interrupt the counseling process, and they often signify the existence of emotions a child or adolescent is unable to express verbally. Some prospective child and adolescent counselors may be ill-equipped to manage disruptive behaviors or recognize that the behaviors are symptomatic of an issue or disorder. This lack of knowledge may elicit a non-therapeutic response from a counselor, which can damage the development of a therapeutic relationship. A therapeutic relationship is vital in order to counsel children and adolescents effectively.

For this Application Assignment, review the Disruptive Behaviors media and select a particular child or adolescent with a disruptive behavior. Consider how the counselor developed and inhibited the therapeutic relationship with the child or adolescent during the counseling sessions.

The assignment (3–5 pages) is in two parts:

  • Select one child or adolescent with a disruptive behavior reflected in the media.

Part One

  • Critically analyze the less effective counseling session with the child or adolescent with the disruptive behavior you selected.
  • Explain one goal the counselor was attempting to accomplish in the counseling approach and why.
  • Explain one way this counseling approach is less effective and why.
  • Explain one error the counselor made that inhibited the development of a therapeutic relationship and why.

Part Two

  • Critically analyze the effective counseling session with the child or adolescent with the disruptive behavior you selected.
  • Explain one goal the counselor was attempting to accomplish in the counseling approach and why.
  • Explain one way the counseling approach was effective and why.
  • Explain two skills the counselor possessed that promoted the development of a therapeutic relationship and why.

References:

  • Flamez, B. & Sheperis, C. J. (2015). Diagnosing and treating children and adolescents: A guide for clinical and school settings. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    • Chapter 6 “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder”
    • Chapter 16 “Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders”
  • Sommers-Flanagan, J., & Sommers-Flanagan, R. (2007). Tough kids, cool counseling: User-friendly approaches with challenging youth(2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
    • Chapter 3, "Resistance Busters: Quick Solutions and Long-Term Strategies"
    • Chapter 7, "Ecological Theory and Parent Education Strategies"
  • Cochran, J. L., Cochran, N. H, Nordling, W. J., McAdam, A., & Miller, D. T. (2010). Two case studies of child-centered play therapy for children referred with highly disruptive behavior. International Journal of Play Therapy, 19(3), 130–143.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
  • Eyberg, S. M., Nelson, M. M., & Boggs, S. R. (2008). Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with disruptive behavior. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37(1), 215–237.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
  • Powers, C. J.. & Bierman, K. L. (2013). The multifaceted impact of peer relations on aggressive-disruptive behaviour in early elementary school. Developmental Psychology, 49(6), 1174–1186.

The transcript of the adolescent I selected is attached

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Disruptive Behaviors Select one child or adolescent with a disruptive behavior. Then critically observe the counseling sessions for that particular child or adolescent. You will be prompted with questions during your critical observation. There will be an opportunity to record your responses within the media. It will be saved directly to the computer that you are using. It is important to view and respond to the questions in their entirety, as your recorded responses will only be saved to this computer. If you change computers, your recorded responses will not be saved. Press the ‘Review’ button to see your recorded responses. [FOUR CASE FILES APPEAR WITH A PHOTOGRAPH OF EACH OF THE CHILDREN PAPERCLIPPED, ONE ON EACH OF THE FOUR INDIVIDUAL MANILLA FOLDERS] Angry Adolescent MELISSA: You are a horrible counselor. I hate being here, and I hate talking to you. This is worthless, and you're stupid. There's no point to this because you don't know anything about me and I'll never tell you anything about me. COUNSELOR: OK, I hear you, but I don't think you could hate counseling with me because, actually, you haven't even had counseling with me before. And so, that doesn't seem quite right. And from what I've heard, I've talked with your mom and I've talked with your probation officer and they both seem to think that you actually could use some counseling. MELISSA: And I think you're an idiot who should go back to jewelry making instead of being a counselor. COUNSELOR: Well, you know, your parents are paying good money to have you come here, and I think you should take it seriously. MELISSA: Like I care what you think. COUNSELOR: Now you're just being disrespectful. [A SET OF QUESTIONS APPEARS ONSCREEN] Reflect on what you just observed. Record your responses in the boxes provided then press ‘Continue’. What approach did the counselor employ? Was it effective? Why or why not? What approach or technique could the counselor have used to create a therapeutic relationship with this client and why would it be successful? Press the ‘Continue’ button to view the next segment. [INSTRUCTIONS BOX APPEARS] You will now observe a different approach with the same client. Look for differences in counseling techniques compared to the earlier session. Click the ‘Continue’ button to start the session. MELISSA: You are a horrible counselor. I hate being here, and I hate talking to you. This is worthless, and you're stupid. There's no point to this because you don't know anything about me, and I'll never tell you anything about me. COUNSELOR: You know you're probably right about most of what you said there. Counseling is a totally weird thing, but I want you to know that you are totally in control of what you say here. I'm not going to force you to do anything. And before you say anything, I just want to let you know that, as you probably read in the form that you filled out, what you say here stays here. It's private, personal information. There are exceptions to that. The only exceptions are in cases of danger; like if you were a danger to yourself or you were homicidal or there was some kind of abuse going on, those are situations where I can't keep the information private. But I know you said you're not going to talk to me, anyway, but I felt like I should let you know that. The other thing I should let you know is that my goal in here is to help you with your goals in life as long as they're legal and as long as they're healthy. We may disagree sometimes about what's legal and what's healthy, but I just wanted to let you know that that's really what my role is here. MELISSA: Great. COUNSELOR: And so I know you don't want to talk but I would like to tell you a little bit about what I know about you, because we are strangers, and that's one of the weirdest things about counseling of all. I did speak to your probation officer, and I did speak with your mom, and both of them told me similar things. They said that you are a very popular young woman in your school, that you have many friends, that you have kind of a bubbling, sparkling personality. They also said that you have a lot of passion, and when you feel strongly about something you really feel strongly about it. And then they said that occasionally it appears that you've gotten kind of angry and that that anger has maybe gotten you in trouble. Is that about right? Is that accurate? MELISSA: Yeah. I do have lots of friends and I like to have fun-- that's right-- but I can't believe they told you that's a good thing. COUNSELOR: They really did. I'm not lying about that. They said that you are very popular, and apparently you have social skills. Does that seem true about you? MELISSA: I guess so. COUNSELOR: The kind of person who has some social skills? MELISSA: [NODDING AFFIRMATIVELY]. COUNSELOR: And then the thing they said about your temper also may be true, that you occasionally [COUNSELOR USES HAND GESTURES AND CREATES A SOUND TO REPRESENT AN EXPLOSION] let it out? MELISSA: Yeah, that's true, too. But I can take care of things myself, and I don't need to talk to any shrink about it. COUNSELOR: Yeah, OK, and totally fine. I think what I sense from you is that you're kind of an independent person. And when you say, "I want to take care of it myself," that gives me that impression. And so that seems true about you, too, that you're independent. You do it your way. MELISSA: Definitely. COUNSELOR: Definitely. OK. Well, one of the things that makes me curious-- and you probably know that I'm going to ask this, and that is, so what are you doing now to take care of yourself? [INSTRUCTIONS BOX APPEARS] You will now watch this session again. At key moments, you will be asked to reflect on what you observed and to answer specific questions. It is important to view and respond to the questions in their entirety, as your recorded responses will only be saved to this computer. If you change computers your recorded responses will not be saved. Record your responses in the boxes provided. Click the ‘Continue’ button to start the session. [THE SESSION STARTS AGAIN] MELISSA: You are a horrible counselor. I hate being here, and I hate talking to you. This is worthless, and you're stupid. There's no point to this because you don't know anything about me and I'll never tell you anything about me. COUNSELOR: You know you're probably right about most of what you said there. Counseling is this totally weird thing, but I want you to know that you are totally in control of what you say here. I'm not going to force you to do anything. [ONE QUESTION APPEARS ONSCREEN] Reflect on what you just observed. Record your response in the box provided then press ‘Continue’. What technique did the counselor use here and why did he use it? Press the ‘Continue’ button to view the next segment. [THE SESSION RESUMES] COUNSELOR: And before you say anything, I just want to let you know that, as you probably read in the form that you filled out, what you say here stays here. It's private, personal information. There are exceptions to that. The only exceptions are in cases of danger; like if you were a danger to yourself or you were homicidal or there was some kind of abuse going on, those are situations where I can't keep the information private. But, I know you said you're not going to talk to me, anyway, but I felt like I should let you know that. The other thing I should let you know is that my goal in here is to help you with your goals in life as long as they're legal and as long as they're healthy. We may disagree sometimes about what's legal and what's healthy, but I just wanted to let you know that that's really what my role is here. MELISSA: Great. [A SET OF QUESTIONS APPEARS ONSCREEN] Reflect on what you just observed. Record your responses in the boxes provided then press ‘Continue’. How effective was this part of the conversation? Why was it done? What would you recommend should have been done? Press the ‘Continue’ button to view the next segment. [THE SESSION RESUMES] COUNSELOR: I know you don't want to talk, but I would like to tell you a little bit about what I know about you, because we are strangers, and that's one of the weirdest things about counseling of all. I did speak to your probation officer and I did speak with your mom, and both of them told me similar things. They said that you are a very popular young woman in your school, that you have many friends, that you have kind of a bubbling, sparkling personality. They also said that you have a lot of passion, and when you feel strongly about something you really feel strongly about it. And then they said that occasionally it appears that you've gotten kind of angry, and that that anger has maybe gotten you in trouble. Is that about right? Is that accurate? [A SET OF QUESTIONS APPEARS ONSCREEN] Reflect on what you just observed. Record your responses in the boxes provided then press ‘Continue’. What is the counselor attempting to do here? Why is he doing this? Why did he mention his conversation with the client’s mother and probation officer? Would you recommend a different question? What question would you have asked the client? Press the ‘Continue’ button to view the next segment. [THE SESSION RESUMES] MELISSA: Yeah, I do have lots of friends and I like to have fun-- that's right-- but I can't believe they told you that's a good thing. COUNSELOR: They really did. I'm not lying about that. They said that you are very popular, and apparently you have social skills. Does that seem true about you? MELISSA: I guess so. COUNSELOR: The kind of person who has some social skills? MELISSA: [NODDING AFFIRMATIVELY]. COUNSELOR: And then the thing they said about your temper also may be true, that you occasionally [COUNSELOR USES HAND GESTURES AND CREATES A SOUND TO REPRESENT AN EXPLOSION] let it out? MELISSA: Yeah, that's true, too. But I can take care of things myself, and I don't need to talk to any shrink about it. [A SET OF QUESTIONS APPEARS ONSCREEN] Reflect on what you just observed. Record your responses in the boxes provided then press ‘Continue’. How effective was this part of the conversation? Why did the counselor mention the client’s temper? Could he have done something different? Press the ‘Continue’ button to view the next segment. [THE SESSION RESUMES] COUNSELOR: Yeah, OK, and totally fine. I think what I sense from you is that you're kind of an independent person. And when you say, "I want to take care of it myself," that gives me that impression. And so that seems true about you, too, that you're independent. You do it your way. MELISSA: Definitely. COUNSELOR: Definitely. OK. Well, one of the things that makes me curious-- and you probably know that I'm going to ask this, and that is, so what are you doing now to take care of yourself? [A SET OF QUESTIONS APPEARS ONSCREEN] Describe one skill, technique, or attribute the counselor exhibited which fostered the therapeutic relationship with the client in the counseling session and explain why. Describe one skill you might teach and reinforce with the client in the counseling session and explain why. Press the ‘Review’ button to review your comments. Review Review and edit your comments within each of the text boxes. When ready, you can copy and paste your comments to your computer by pressing the ‘Copy’ button, or by downloading them to your desktop as a text file by pressing the ‘Download’ button. Pressing the ‘Save’ button will record your comments to this computer so that you may return later to edit your responses. ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running head: THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIPS

Therapeutic Relationships
Student’s Name:
Institutional Affiliation:

1

THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIPS
Therapeutic Relationships
Part 1
In the first case scenario, we are introduced to an angry adolescent having a session
with a counselor. In this scenario, we find a furious candidate referred to as Melissa. The first
session is less efficient as it does not address the needs of the victim. First, we find that the
counselor does not address the immediate need, which is addressing the adolescent's anger.
For starters, we observe that Melissa does not want anything to do with the counseling
session. She goes ahead to call the counselor worthless and stupid. These actions are a façade
to hide Melissa's intention of not participating in the counseling session.
Another significant aspect of the session is that the counselor coerces Melissa into
attending the meeting. It happens by informing her of the conversation with both her mother
and the probation officer. Moreover, Melissa feels pressured to submit to her mother's views
and the probation officer's rather than her's. According to Flamez and Sheperis (2015), in
handling angry adolescents, it is vital to eradicate their anger by acknowledging their point of
view concerning a particular matter. Sommers-Flanaga...

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