Writing
COMM 3311 001 UH Content Marketing Advertorial Proposal

COMM 3311 001

University of Houston

COMM

Question Description

Help me study for my Communications class. I’m stuck and don’t understand.

Instructions- Write a 1000 word advertorial can be a-little less or a-little more. The Directions / Examples will be located in a document that i will provide you. I will also provide the Outline that the Paper has to be on which is sweat shops. Basically use outline to write the paper please! Use simple words and use concrete sentences.

Also don't try to promote its more addressing an issue and how too go about fixing it

I will tip nicely considering this is a hard time for people due to the corona virus, stay safe!!😀

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Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday PR & Advertising Copywriting Writing Assignment 3 Writing an Advertorial (Due 3/9/20, Monday) This copywriting assignment requires that you write an advertorial for the business/organization you are promoting. An advertorial is a form of content advertising/marketing, which focuses on growing, fostering and maintaining strong relationships with the target audience through education instead of pushing a product/service at the customers. The information of your advertorial should be original and creative, it should not overlap any of the content you used in your previous writing assignments for this class. Maximum Points: 300 points (15% of the course grade) Guidelines for Creating an Advertorial (minimum length requirement: 1000 words) 1. Write an advertorial of no less than 1000 words to promote your business/organization in a newspaper, a magazine, or on a website. 2. You need to identify a theme for your advertorial. Decide on the aspects of the business/organization you want to write about in the advertorial (e.g. giving back to community, announcing newlines of product, new services/programs, promoting a worthy course, addressing a pressuring social issue, educating the customers about your product/service, introducing a trend relative to your brand and target audience.) 3. You need to gather quotes from the head and employees of the organization. Face-to-face interviews are not strictly required but encouraged. Testimonials from authoritative sources will be a plus. 4. Create an attention-grabbing headline for your advertorial. Headline construction is a major grading area for this assignment. 5. Create an engaging lead (opening paragraph) for your advertorial. Guidelines for Writing the Creative Brief (minimum length requirement: 350 words) 1. Clearly identify the publication that will carry your advertorial. Provide rationale for your selection of publication. 2. Explain your understanding of the publication’s target audience. 3. Discuss your topic selection and your rationale for using your chosen topic. Explain how and why the topic is relevant both to your brand and to your target audience. 4. Discuss your headline and lead (opening paragraph) construction. 5. Discuss your design and development of the storyline, your fact gathering efforts, and Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday how you conducted your interviews. 6. Rationale for using the native advertising approach or the traditional advertorial approach. Sample Advertorials/Native Ads The New York Times 1. The New York Times’ “T Brand Studio” 1 deftly combines subtle native advertising with high-quality in-house content marketing befitting of the Gray Lady. This well-researched Adobe piece on the future of shopping provides valuable insights and statistics regarding shopping trends in a VR-centric future but does so without appearing too salesy. 2 RETAIL’S TECH REVOLUTION: Robots that pick out your outfits and other digital technology will transform the shopping experience. The New York Times. [Paid for and Posted by ADOBE] 2. Deziel, Melanie. “Women Inmates: Why the Male Model Doesn’t Work As the number of women inmates soars, so does the need for policies and programs that meet their needs.” The New York Times. [Sponsored by Netflix Orange is the New Black Season 2] 3. “Via an Island of Hope, a New Home.” The New York Times. [Sponsored Content by airbnb] The Wall Street Journal 4. To promote its show Narcos, Netflix collaborated with the Wall Street Journal to create an interactive portal exploring the history of the international drug trade, and its nexus in Medellín, Colombia. Featuring well-designed maps, timelines, articles, and even a quiz, this is a great example of native advertising generating interest and value. Green, Peter. “The Syndicate: How Cocaine Traffickers from Medellín Transformed the Multibillion Dollar Global Drug Trade.” The Wall Street Journal. [Sponsored and Generated by Netflix NARCOS] The Atlantic 5. The Atlantic proves again that it is at the forefront of developing high-quality and engaging sponsored content, this time for IBM. In this 4 part series, “Blood, Sweat, and Data” new Moses, Lucia. “Beyond native: How the NY Times plans to turn T Brand Studio into a full-fledged agency.” 20 July 2016. DIGDAY Magazine. https://digiday.com/media/beyond-native-ny-times-plansturn-t-brand-studio-full-fledged-agency/. 2 “19 Amazing Native Advertising Ad Examples.” 15 March 2017. Ad Space by Hootsuite. https://adespresso.com/blog/19-amazing-native-advertising-ad-examples/ 1 Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday innovations in sports medicine, equipment, and cloud solutions are analyzed alongside accessible infographics and shareable statistics. “BLOOD, SWEAT AND DATA: A four-part series on the revolutionary rise of technology in sports.”[Sponsored Content by IBM] Fortune Magazine 6. To promote its “Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice” film, [Warner Brothers] decided to sponsor a native advertising interview with villain Lex Luthor Jr, under the guise of sponsorship by “LexCorp.” This is a great way to acknowledge the pitfalls of native advertising (such as the non-discreet sponsorship branding), while also helping maintain suspension of disbelief, for a tycoon like Luthor probably would sponsor native advertising in a magazine like Fortune. Coverage of the “Interview” in Other Media Outlets Marston, George. (October 6, 2015). “FORTUNE Interviews BATMAN v SUPERMAN's LEX LUTHOR” (Newsarama) Lesnick, Silas. (OCTOBER 5, 2015) “ LexCorp’s Lex Luthor Sits Down with Fortune Magazine ” (Superhero Hype) Fortune Magazine Lands Exclusive Interview With Lex Luthor (DC Comics News) Rivera, Joshua. (October 6, 2015). “Here's a Fake Fortune Profile of Jesse Eisenberg's Lex Luthor Just in case you forgot Batman is about to fight Superman in a movie. ” The Washington Post 7. “The Rise of the Superhuman: Technology that May Eradicate Human Error. [Content from Mercedes-Benz E-Class Family.] BBC 8. Fisher, Richard. (October 18, 2017). “Here is the face of American political power.” BBC. [Sponsored Story for BBC Future] Business Insider 9. Spector, Dina. (May 23, 2018). “This multi-colored corn is real and there's a fantastic story behind it.” Business Insider. [ Content Created for Native/SEARCH, a not-for-profit conservation company that now owns the product.] Forbes Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday 10. KPMG. (July 19, 2018). “The Great Rewrite: The Future of Work In An Automated World.” Forbes. [Content Created by KPMG Brand Voice] Mashable 11. “Relationship Studies: Humans and Mobile.” [Sponsored Content by Master Card] Slate 12. “Beatboxing Transforms Education at Lavelle School for the Blind: The B.E.A.T. NYC program teaches handicapped students how to discover confidence through music.” Slate. [Content Published by Wells Fargo] Sample Advertorial Forbes When Should You Take A Buyout Offer From Your Employer? Word Count: 942 Paragraph Count: 11 Susan Adams Forbes Staff I’m a senior editor in charge of Forbes’ education coverage. On Monday, package shipping giant FedExannounced it would offer buyouts to an unspecified number of staffers as it looks to reorganize its U.S. operations. How should those FedEx workers decide whether to take buyouts? If you’re offered a buyout to give up your job, what should you do? Career professionals say there are several good reasons to take a buyout. It can be a boon if you’re at a point in your career where you are thinking seriously about retirement. Also, if you feel like you’ve been passed over for a promotion or you’ve lost clout within your organization, it can make sense to consider a buyout offer. Another reason: If you are unhappy in your current post and you know that you are a marketable commodity should you start job-hunting. A buyout can also provide a bridge to starting your own consulting venture or serve as a financial cushion if you’re thinking of making a career switch that requires going back to school. But Robin Pinkley, a professor of management and organization at SMU Cox School of Business in Dallas and author of Get Paid What You’re Worth: The Expert Negotiators’ Guide to Salary and Compensation, says that too many employees are wooed by the positives of a buyout offer, and they don’t think hard enough about the costs. For instance, if you are over 50, she says, “we know that the probability of being rehired exponentially declines.” No matter what age you are, if you’re intending to look for another job after you take your buyout, your bargaining power instantly plummets, she points out, because hiring managers view you as less desirable if you don’t have a job. “You’re competing with others who still have a job,” she notes. On the other hand, says Pinkley, you should be clear-eyed about what will happen if you stay at a company that is offering buyouts. Chances are good that your workload will increase as others take buyouts and the staff shrinks. You may not be working with the colleagues you have come to enjoy. It’s also possible that the company is heading into a period where the next round of cuts will be layoffs, instead of voluntary departures, and your position could be on the block. Ellis Chase, a longtime New York career coach who used to work in hiring at Chase bank and at staffing firm Right Management, says he’s had clients make the most of their buyout stories and that companies understand when applicants explain they decided to take advantage of the opportunity to focus on a search fulltime. One of Chase’s clients was a managing director at a company that made an acquisition of another company, creating redundancy within the organization. The client had been thinking of going out on his own as an independent contractor, so he offered to take a buyout. “It was a wonderful buffer,” says Chase. Another client who was in his 30s and worked in financial services had been thinking seriously about taking a trip around the world with his wife and young child. When his company offered a buyout, he accepted, and his wife quit her job and joined him. They traveled for a year and were able to line up jobs before they returned to the U.S. Though it worked out for that couple, Chase says that too many people use a buyout as an excuse to take time off. It’s wiser to dive straight into your job hunt, he advises. “Running away is not what this should be about,” he notes. Taking a buyout should be part of a careful plan, including a job search timetable. Chase, Pinkley and Dale Winston, the CEO of executive search firm Battalia Winston, all say it makes sense to try to negotiate for the best possible buyout offer. Do ask colleagues about what sort of packages they are getting, confer with former colleagues who have taken buyouts, and talk to your employer about whether or not any company stock you have as part of your compensation package is fully vested. Junior employees can also negotiate whether they can keep their company laptop and smartphone. For more senior employees, companies are often willing to bridge whatever gap you may face between your severance date and the timetable for collecting retirement benefits. For tax reasons, it is almost always preferable to take a payout over time, as opposed to in one lump sum. “Everything is negotiable,” says Chase. It’s also wise to come to an agreement about references. Especially if you were passed over for a promotion, ask your employer to agree to say glowing things about you. Another consideration: non-compete agreements. If you are considering working for a rival or starting a consulting enterprise that could take business from your employer, you want to make sure you are not restricting your options by signing a document that would prevent you from competing with your employer. Though it’s not wise to broadcast your decision to colleagues, you also don’t want to make it in a vacuum. Do consult a financial adviser to get a sense of your health insurance costs going forward, and how much of a financial cushion the buyout will offer. Finally, it’s important to do some emotional soul searching before you accept a buyout offer. If you’ve worked in one place for a decade or more, the office can become a part of your sense of yourself, and it may be difficult to sever those ties. On the other hand, you may be ready to cut loose and forge out on your own. The final answer will come, likely as not, from your gut. Susan Adams Forbes Staff In February 2018, I took on a new job managing and writing Forbes' education coverage. I'd spent the previous two years on the Entrepreneurs team, following six years writing for the Leadership channel. My mission with education is to explore the intersection of education and business. I'm recruiting contributors and also looking for my own stories. I’ve been at Forbes since 1995, writing about everything from books to billionaires. Among my favorite stories: South Africa’s first black billionaire, Patrice Motsepe, and British diamond jewelry mogul Laurence Graff, both of whom built their vast fortunes from nothing. At Forbes Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday Grading Sheet for Advertorial Project Name: Headline: Grade: 300 points= Content of Advertorial /220 points 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The headline is attention grabbing and matches the style of the adverbial. Amount of information meets the basic requirements. The storyline is complete. It shows plots and turn and presents good story telling skills. The writing should include reportable facts and well selected quotes. Information used in the advertorial should be original and creative. It should not overlap the content of your previous assignments for this class. 6. Use of quotations and attributions. 7. Show a variety of sources of information. Comments Creative Brief /80 points 7. Clearly identify the publication that will carry your advertorial. Provide rationale for your selection of publication. 8. Explain your understanding of the publication’s target audience. Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Prof. Suya Yin PR & Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday 9. Discuss your topic selection and your rationale for using your chosen topic. Explain how and why the topic is relevant both to your brand and to your target audience. 10. Discuss your headline and lead (opening paragraph) construction. 11. Discuss your design and development of the storyline, your fact gathering efforts, and how you conducted your interviews. 12. Rationale for using the native advertising approach or the traditional advertorial approach. Comments Total: /300 points Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Professor Suya Yin Advanced PR and Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday PR & Advertising Copywriting Participation Exercise-6 (Due 3-6-20, Friday) Name: Brad Siminsky Grade: /150points This is a proposal for your content marketing advertorial writing assignment. It is worth 150 points. Fill out the table below following the instructions for each topic area. Please don’t remove my instructions. Proposal for Content Marketing Advertorial Introduction to Type of Content 1. Explain whether you plan to write a journalism advertorial or an advocacy advertorial. 2. Briefly explain why a journalism advertorial or an advocacy advertorial works best for your brand. Advocacy advertorial allows the affected company like Nike to directly and in detail explain their position on the matter. It will enable Nike to clarify to its stakeholders the problem and the necessary steps they have undertaken to address it. Nike can show that they have pursued solutions and implemented them accordingly. Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Professor Suya Yin Advanced PR and Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday Strategy for Content Development 1. What is a possible topic for your advertorial? Your rationale for using this topic. A possible topic for my advertorial is the challenges of sweatshops. My rationale for using this topic is to identify stressors and conditions of sweatshops and to highlight what apparel companies, like Nike are doing to help. 2. What is your research plan for gathering useful/valuable/entertaining information for your content development? In order to gain appropriate information for my content development I am planning to identify current issues and collect data. I will specifically research which countries are still utilizing sweat shops, how many employees are affected, working conditions and compensation. I will next identify what is being done currently to reduce and eliminate sweat shops. I will also collect data on how effective the current efforts are. In order to make sure this information is entertaining, I will try to find the most dramatic evidence to share in order to bring in more viewers. 3. In MLA style, provide a list of three references below on your tentative topic. (See example below) Bain, Marc. “Nike Is Facing a New Wave of Anti-Sweatshop Protests.” Quartz, Quartz, 31 Aug. 2017, qz.com/1042298/nike-is-facing-a-new-wave-of-anti-sweatshop-protests/. Blattman, Christopher, and Dercon, Stefan. “Everything We Knew About Sweatshops Was Wrong.” 17 Apr. 2017, The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/27/opinion/do-sweatshops-lift-workers-out-ofpoverty.html. Accessed 2 Mar. 2020. Greenberg, Josh, and Graham Knight. “Framing Sweatshops: Nike, Global Production, and the American News Media.” Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, vol. 1, no. 2, 2004, pp. 151–175. Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Professor Suya Yin Advanced PR and Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday Hobbes, Michael. “The Myth of the Ethical Shopper.” 2015, Highline, https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/articles/en/the-myth-of-the-ethical-shopper/. Accessed 1 Mar. 2020. Wazir, Burhan. “Nike Accused of Tolerating Sweatshops.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 19 May 2001, www.theguardian.com/world/2001/may/20/burhanwazir.theobserver. Spring 2020 COMM3311-001 Professor Suya Yin Advanced PR and Advertising Copywriting 1/20/Monday ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Surname

1

Name: Brad Siminsky

Grade:

/150points

Institutions:
Date: (Due 3-6-20, Friday)
PR & Advertising Copywriting Participation Exercise-6
Proposal for Content Marketing Advertorial
Introduction to Type of Content
1. Explain whether you plan to write a journalism advertorial or an advocacy advertorial.
I plan to use advocacy advertorial content
2. Briefly explain why a journalism advertorial or an advocacy advertorial works best for
your brand.
Advocacy advertorial allows the affected company like Nike to directly and in detail
explain their position on the matter. It will enable Nike to clarify to its stakeholders the
problem and the necessary steps they have undertaken to address it. Nike can show that
they have pursued solutions and implemented them accordingly.
Strategy for Content Development
1. What is a possible topic for your advertorial? Your rationale for using this topic.
2. A possible topic for my advertorial is "Sweatshops in the 21st century: A necessary or
unnecessary dilemma?" My rationale for using this topic is to identify stressors and
conditions of sweatshops and to highlight what apparel companies, like Nike, are doing to
help. The topic is exciting and captures the reader's attention to read and find out about the
content. The reader will be interested in finding out the argument from both sides of the
topic. Therefore, Nike will explain its side of the story and gain reader understanding by
providing the reader with an argument for and against sweatshops while informing the

Surname

2

readers of the measures that Nike and other brands have taken to address the challenges of
sweatshops.
3. What is your research plan for gathering useful/valuable/entertaining information for
your content development?

To gain appropriate information for my content development, I am planning to identify
current ...

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New York University

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