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Abdill Career College Unit 8 Conducting an Ice Breaker Activity Report

Abdill Career College

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Follow the instruction to write 2pages activity using the template

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Conducting an Ice Breaker Activity The point of this activity is: • to provide you with a chance to conduct an ice breaker • to have you estimate the relative success of the activity • to have you consider how the activity might be improved in the future STEP 1: To complete this activity you will need to gather a small group of people (6-10) for approximately 30 minutes. This may take a few days to organize. So plan ahead and plan accordingly. Unlike other activities where you can reflect on the unit content and your personal experience to complete the activity, this particular activity will require you to actually conduct an ice breaker activity. That is, it cannot be completed in one setting/at one time. It requires some planning. STEP 2: While you are arranging to have a group available for completing the ice breaker, review the ice breaker activities included in the Ice Breaker Activities Inventory. Choose an activity from those available. The only one that will not work well is Excess Baggage as it is tied to have a training session immediately following the ice breaker, which you will not. Prepare the necessary materials. STEP 3: Assemble the appropriate materials for the ice breaker you have chosen. STEP 4: Schedule the a group to meet (one where people do not know each other too well). STEP 5: Conduct the ice breaker. STEP 6: Complete the report below using as much space as necessary to respond. Be detailed in your responses. Also be honest and critical as you are not being graded on how well you performed the ice breaker, but rather on your understanding of how well it worked and how it could be improved. Name of Activity: Number of People Involved: Location of Activity: Time/Day of Activity: Materials Needed and Used: 1. Overall, how well did the activity work? Did people seem to enjoy it and get to know one another better as a result? 2. What were the shortcomings of the ice breaker? To what degree were these part of the design of the activity (something inherently wrong with the activity) or with the execution of it (something that could have been done better in the preparation and carrying out of the activity — e.g., timing, materials, etc.)? 3. What would you do different in the future to improve the ice breaker activity? Conducting an Ice Breaker Activity The point of this activity is: • to provide you with a chance to conduct an ice breaker • to have you estimate the relative success of the activity • to have you consider how the activity might be improved in the future STEP 1: To complete this activity you will need to gather a small group of people (6-10) for approximately 30 minutes. This may take a few days to organize. So plan ahead and plan accordingly. Unlike other activities where you can reflect on the unit content and your personal experience to complete the activity, this particular activity will require you to actually conduct an ice breaker activity. That is, it cannot be completed in one setting/at one time. It requires some planning. STEP 2: While you are arranging to have a group available for completing the ice breaker, review the ice breaker activities included in the Ice Breaker Activities Inventory. Choose an activity from those available. The only one that will not work well is Excess Baggage as it is tied to have a training session immediately following the ice breaker, which you will not. Prepare the necessary materials. STEP 3: Assemble the appropriate materials for the ice breaker you have chosen. STEP 4: Schedule the a group to meet (one where people do not know each other too well). STEP 5: Conduct the ice breaker. STEP 6: Complete the report below using as much space as necessary to respond. Be detailed in your responses. Also be honest and critical as you are not being graded on how well you performed the ice breaker, but rather on your understanding of how well it worked and how it could be improved. Name of Activity: Getting to know you better Number of People Involved: 7 Location of Activity: ASU Campus Time/Day of Activity: 3/17/2018 Materials Needed and Used: Questionnaire survey 1. Overall, how well did the activity work? Did people seem to enjoy it and get to know one another better as a result? The activity works good and the students in the ASU they all enjoy the questionnaire survey. 2. What were the shortcomings of the ice breaker? To what degree were these part of the design of the activity (something inherently wrong with the activity) or with the execution of it (something that could have been done better in the preparation and carrying out of the activity — e.g., timing, materials, etc.)? Some people feel embarrass to finish the survey and some people don’t want to know each other. Some of them already know each other, so they affect the accuracy of the result. 3. What would you do different in the future to improve the ice breaker activity? Maybe change the questions in the questionnaire. Pursuit Imagine being able to tap into the abilities and talents of every team member while practicing and applying team process skills. Teams of approximately 12 are given backpacks with supplies, and strategize how to acquire the greatest number of points for completing a series of challenges. Illuminating problem-solving, innovation, shared leadership, communication skills, team planning and time management, Pursuit is a timed event, but it’s not a race—we keep the competition “friendly.” Performance-oriented groups, sales professionals and product development teams are particularly well-suited to this high-energy, multi-tasking program. Action-oriented by design, Pursuit can be built to fit your team’s targeted growth areas, and can be held almost anywhere your group decides to meet: a resort, nearby park or your facility. We’ve led Pursuit for groups as small as 16 and as large as 700+, for all ages and levels of physical ability. PURSUIT BENEFITS Participants experience camaraderie as a result of successfully solving problems together. The combination of sophisticated physical, intellectual and creative challenges offers something for everyone. Participants are required to make both big picture decisions and to consider the details. The quick pace of the program heightens senses and aids in learning processes. It is highly interactive and customizable, illuminating scores of team dynamics and areas for improvement. It engages all learning styles, and respects individual perspectives, capacities and preferences. Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 PURSUIT SAMPLE AGENDA Introduction Review the rules, instructions, and timeline verbally. Hand out the team backpacks, which include written instructions, a Challenge Locator, camera and other supplies needed for the program. The focus of your training initiative is carefully integrated into the discussions at this stage. (approximately 10 minutes) Strategy Session Participants review assignments, paperwork and supplies. As they strategize how and when they will attempt various challenges (concurrently or sequentially), teams are asked to set goals for how they will work together and examine leadership roles, and finally formulate a plan for success. (approximately 20 minutes) Begin Pursuit Challenges All teams will attempt to complete identical challenges within a set time period. The challenges are a combination of proven, high-energy, problem-solving initiatives, physical challenges, intellectual puzzles and photo assignments that encourage new leaders to help their teams become highperforming. (approximately 2.5 hours for half-day Pursuit and 6 hours for full-day Pursuits) Return to Staging Area Teams turn in their backpacks with completed assignments to be scored by facilitators. Individual Team Discussions Teams gather together to answer questions about sharing best practices, leadership at all levels, and interpersonal dynamics. These questions can also be tailored to compliment the focus of your training initiative…from improved communication to collaboration to high performing teams. (approximately 20 minutes) Scoring The scores of each team are tallied and a team recognition ceremony follows. We then announce the Total Team Score—this balances the importance of team and organizational success. (approximately 10 minutes) Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 Debrief Typically, the stories shared are about how teams tended to organize themselves around a challenge, what types of leadership surfaced and how they plan to apply this information to their own high-performing teams. We’re careful to discuss both process goals and task goals. The facilitator helps provide context and “closure” during this portion of the program. (approximately 20 minutes) Program Complete (approximately 3.5 hours for half-day programs and 7.5 hours for full-day programs) OPTIONAL SPECIAL FEATURES Point Person: at each challenge, the team elects a point person to act as leader and coordinator for that challenge, facilitating team interactions. Knowledge Transfer: if the Knowledge Transfer special feature is selected, participants will capture a best practice at each challenge for the other teams to use when they get to that point. Sharing information is a key component to effective collaboration. Poem, Limerick, Cheer: if your group is lively, you may want to consider wrapping up the adventure with a “talent” competition. One of the self-directed challenges that you can select requires all the teams to develop a poem, limerick, song or cheer that encapsulates their experiences. Team Presentation: each team develops a 1-2 minute presentation complete with audio visuals that informs the other teams about their Pursuit experience. SAMPLE FACILITATED CHALLENGES You and a facilitator will choose from among these and other options based on the skill sets upon which you wish to focus. Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 Blindfold Croquet/Putting –Coaching and clear communication are tested as a sightless partner is guided through the course by their teammate. Trust and Communication Leaky Pipe – Team members attempt to raise a floating object to the top of a large plastic pipe. Strategic planning, good communication and team persistence help the team keep water from leaking out of the holes. Collaboration and Leadership Matrix– Only one safe course exists on the entire grid. Memory and strategy are required for each team to find their way through the matrix. Trust and Communication Pipeline– Teams try to move a small ball from the starting line to the finish bucket without stopping or dropping the ball. A coordinated team effort is required to manage the assortment of pipeline components. Leadership and Creative Problem Solving Precious Cargo– The group uses a devise to transport three precariously balanced objects through a marked off obstacle course. This activity requires precise coordination, cooperation and innovation to keep the cargo from dropping. Leadership, Creative Problem Solving, Decision Making and Roles and Goals Roadblock– Team members form pairs. One person guides a blindfolded team member through an obstacle course using only verbal directions. Effective coaching and clear communications are tested in this insightful challenge. Trust and Communication Sure Shot– Teams score points by shooting balls into baskets. Each round allows an opportunity to re-strategize for maximum efficiency. Goal setting and achievement, planning, creativity and utilization of group resources all contribute to the carry over value of this event. Goal Setting and Communication The Web– Pass through various size holes in a giant web structure without touching the string or using any of the openings more than once. This challenge requires a great deal of cooperation, trust and “start to finish” planning to enable the team to be successful. Trust, Collaboration and Strategy Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 SAMPLE SELF-DIRECTED CHALLENGES You and a facilitator will choose from among these and other options based on your team’s interests and the facilitated challenges you’ve selected. All Tied Up– Teams attempt to complete a number of knot tying challenges from a diagram and turn in before the end of Pursuit. Compass Course– Learn basic compass skills then find your way from marker to marker around the grounds of the resort, conference facility or park. MindStretchers– Mentally challenging pencil and paper problems to be deciphered and turned in. Photo Challenge– An ongoing challenge of Pursuit will be to photo-document some of your accomplishments using Polaroid cameras given to each team. You will have to get creative or use outside resources to accomplish your photodocumentation assignments. Team Survival– Each team reads an adventure-gone-wrong scenario. Then the group must review a list of objects and agree on the most important survival items. Trivia– A variety of general trivia questions that need to be completed and turned in before the end of Pursuit. Trivia questions can also be customized to focus on company, personnel or industry related information. Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 GeoTrek GeoTrek, based on the recreational sport of geo-caching, blends adventure and technology. Courses are set in rural or urban setting and secret caches are hidden in parks or peculiar city spots. Your team will experience the novelty of learning to use GPS devices and the excitement of locating caches. The caches contain clues to the next cache or instructions for team challenges. Teams of 3-4 are given maps or charts, then taught to use GPS (global positioning system) units to determine the location of a secret cache. Each team chooses the caches it will attempt to locate based on their point value, the distance from the caches, and the team’s strategy (fewer “big ticket” caches, or many smaller caches). It takes deductive reasoning to determine exactly where the cache may be and solid planning and strategy to set the overall GPS course. Once found, the team uses the unit to navigate from their current location to another location...translating the “asthe-crow-flies” directions into a real path using sidewalks, streets or trails as necessary. GeoTrek can include long hikes, or a series of short walks to get to the caches depending on your group’s objectives, and many cities offer public transportation that can greatly increase the distances covered in this 4-hour team building adventure. GEOTREK BENEFITS o Teams get to explore unknown territory together, and practice modified-consensus decision-making and problem-solving skills. o Participants appreciate the opportunity to participate in the creation of their adventure as they choose the caches that they want to locate. o The natural disagreements that arise during GeoTrek provide a forum for practicing conflict resolution skills. o The analogies of “plotting a course,” “discovering a new path,” and “mastering new territory,” all tie directly to workplace needs. o Past participants appreciated the opportunities to strategize, collaborate and take on leadership roles (some for the first time). Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 o The combination of technology and human intuition parallels the divergent yet equally necessary components of most workplaces. o It allows participants to explore an urban locale together (as opposed to being in a conference room all day). o It requires different kinds of intelligence than what is commonly accessed in the workplace, for example, being able to read maps, having a strong sense of direction, understanding spatial relationships. o It aligns with organizational competencies around: teamwork, cross-functional thinking, influence and impact, transferring knowledge, drive and persistence. GEOTREK SAMPLE AGENDA Introduction The group first sets goals about how they will work together throughout the day. Next they learn how to enter coordinates into their GPS (global positioning system) unit, how to navigate, and then familiarize themselves with the charts, street maps or trail maps provided. (approximately 30 minutes) Lessons Participants break into small groups to practice using a GPS device under the guidance of a facilitator. (approximately 15 minutes) Trekking Teams are formed and receive their course and a backpack with supplies, then work interdependently to choose the caches they wish to locate, then follow clues as well as coordinates. Together they learn that teams often have to “chart new territory” whether in a natural or work environment. If it is a timed event, they’ll have to strategize the best way to spend their precious minutes: do they continue searching for a cache, or risk losing points using a clue? Together the teams will make decisions on the fly and adjust their strategy moment-tomoment. (approximately 2.25 hours) Large Group Discussion All teams reconvene to discuss what they learned from their experiences during the GeoTrek program. How well did team members learn then teach each other new skills? How were decisions made? How did they deal with frustration? What types of leadership surfaced during the day? How did they handle their roles and responsibilities? Scores are tallied at this point in the program and shared. (approximately 30 minutes) Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 Build a Bridge Pretend you’re an engineer for a day as you and your team design and build a prototype of a bridge. This team building adventure will ignite your team’s creative energy as they move through the stages of designing, planning, building, troubleshooting and presenting their prototypes to the other teams. We’ll split your group into teams of 6 -10: each team then divides itself in half with the objective being to build two halves of a bridge in two separate locations that will be joined at the end of the program. With only limited simulated phone, email and fax communication to keep them on track during the construction phase, participants learn how to make the most of the planning phase and how to better communicate throughout the lifecycle of a project. Once built, the bridge prototypes are shared with the team, who assesses the aesthetic value of the creations, and tested for their strength. The teams that succeed are those in which someone in the group can capture everyone’s imagination, provide a vision and motivate them to move forward. Build a Bridge can be facilitated indoors at almost any location, and works for groups as small as 8 and as large as 300. We particularly recommend this adventure for virtual teams (geographically dispersed groups) as it very closely parallels their daily work situation, R&D groups and upper-level managers who must coordinate the efforts of disparate work units. BENEFITS OF BUILD A BRIDGE Build a Bridge requires a shared vision (the design) which must then be communicated through a variety of mediums: verbal, written, drawings, to other teammates. Participants must master resource allocation if they are to be successful: Build a Bridge requires good project management skills. Participants must be good at building consensus and implementing a plan. Choosing one bridge design Copyright 2007, Adventure Associates, Inc. 800.987.5582 that meets the specifications laid out in the program is difficult. Participants must be able to coordinate the efforts of many people who may not share work space. Build a Bridge requires both mechanical skills and interpersonal skills…it requires both attention to details and a big picture view…just like your workplace. It aligns with organizational values and interests around customer-orientation, quality orientation, cross-functional ...
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Conducting an Ice Breaker Activity
The point of this activity is:
• to provide you with a chance to conduct an ice breaker
• to have you estimate the relative success of the activity
• to have you consider how the activity might be improved in the future
STEP 1:

To complete this activity you will need to gather a small group of
people (6-10) for approximately 30 minutes.
This may take a few days to organize. So plan ahead and plan
accordingly. Unlike other activities where you can reflect on the unit
content and your personal experience to complete the activity, this
particular activity will require you to actually conduct an ice breaker
activity. That is, it cannot be completed in one setting/at one time. It
requires some planning.

STEP 2:

While you are arranging to have a group available for completing the
ice breaker, review the ice breaker activities included in the Ice
Breaker Activities Inventory. Choose an activity from those
available. The only one that will not work well is Excess Baggage as
it is tied to have a training session immediately following the ice
breaker, which you will not. Prepare the necessary materials.

STEP 3:

Assemble the appropriate materials for the ice breaker you have
chosen.

STEP 4:

Schedule the a group to meet (one where people do not know each
other too well).

STEP 5:

Conduct the ice breaker.

STEP 6:

Complete the report below using as much space as necessary to
respond. Be detailed in your responses. Also be honest and critical as
you are not being graded on how well you performed the ice breaker,
but rather on your understanding of how well it worked and how it
could be improved.

Name of Activity: Pursuit
Number of People Involved: 12 people
Location of Activity:
Time/Day of Activity: Monday, 5pm
Materials Needed and Used: Backpacks full with supplies
1. Overall, how well did the activity work? Did people seem to enjoy it and get to
Know one another better as a result?
Coordination of activities was easy since the members were cooperative. I
asked 12coworker to fetch supplies and dinner, and then I proposed the
activity after feeding. The team members en...

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