Writing
UMGC Wk 2 McDonalds Tactical Decisions for The Span of One Year Discussion

University of Maryland Global Campus

Question Description

I need an explanation for this Management question to help me study.

350 words

First, read Week 2 Content on Data and How Information Supports Decision Making, paying particular attention to the Levels of Decision Making. For purposes of this discussion, we will use a retail business as an example. This retail business is comprised of the corporate headquarters, regions (oversees several stores in a geographic area) and individual stores. Each of these aligns to one of the three levels of decision makers in an organization.

Main Postings: Select one of the levels of decision making and identify one decision that a manager at that level might make. The decision must relate to the retail business and what it does. Then, explain what information a manager at that level might get from the IT systems (such as inventory management or customer information system) to aid in making that decision.

Example: Managerial Level: The Regional Director makes a decision to shift inventory that is not selling in one store to another store where sales in those items are high. To support this decision, the Regional Director would need information on sales of specific products by store.

Remember – the Group 2 initial posting is due by Wednesday midnight; it should be about two short paragraphs in length, supported by external research, and it should be posted by clicking on "Start a New Thread". Please look at what has been posted by your classmates before choosing your examples and then select something that has not yet been discussed, if possible. Let’s try to spread the discussion across as many examples as possible.

Then members of Groups 1, 3 and 4 should reply to at least three different postings by other classmates before Sunday midnight. Responses to initial postings should be specific and assess whether posting accurately and sufficiently addresses the questions asked in the discussion topic and should incorporate relevant research correctly. Explain your assessment as to why the information is or is not correct and/or complete, providing correct information to enhance the discussion.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

First, read Week 2 Content on Data and How Information Supports Decision Making, paying particular attention to the Levels of Decision Making. For purposes of this discussion, we will use a retail business as an example. This retail business is comprised of the corporate headquarters, regions (oversees several stores in a geographic area) and individual stores. Each of these aligns to one of the three levels of decision makers in an organization. Main Postings: Select one of the levels of decision making and identify one decision that a manager at that level might make. The decision must relate to the retail business and what it does. Then, explain what information a manager at that level might get from the IT systems (such as inventory management or customer information system) to aid in making that decision. Example: Managerial Level: The Regional Director makes a decision to shift inventory that is not selling in one store to another store where sales in those items are high. To support this decision, the Regional Director would need information on sales of specific products by store. Remember – the Group 2 initial posting is due by Wednesday midnight; it should be about two short paragraphs in length, supported by external research, and it should be posted by clicking on "Start a New Thread". Please look at what has been posted by your classmates before choosing your examples and then select something that has not yet been discussed, if possible. Let’s try to spread the discussion across as many examples as possible. Then members of Groups 1, 3 and 4 should reply to at least three different postings by other classmates before Sunday midnight. Responses to initial postings should be specific and assess whether posting accurately and sufficiently addresses the questions asked in the discussion topic and should incorporate relevant research correctly. Explain your assessment as to why the information is or is not correct and/or complete, providing correct information to enhance the discussion. Learning Resource Print Data This week we will take a closer look at data, how it is stored and used, and how it is organized. While it is not expected that you will become database experts, it is critical that you understand the fundamentals of how data is stored, arranged, classified, linked together, and secured for efficiency in providing information. Data is the key to information systems. Data is the raw facts collected from various transactions and events throughout an organization. Individually, the data represents a specific item such as a product code, customer address, invoice amount, etc. Collectively, information systems transform the data into useful information. For example, collecting the totals of all the invoices for a given month lets us know how much was sold. Therefore, if information is derived from data, it is critical that the data be correct both in content and format. Accuracy and data integrity enable the organization to rely on the information to effectively manage, control, plan, and oversee what's going on in the business. In today's business environment, there is tremendous power in linking databases throughout the enterprise to get the right information to the right people at the right time. In addition, databases can provide strategic business intelligence to effectively support decision making. However, it's important to emphasize that ultimately it is the ability of employees and managers to interpret the information, understand how to apply it effectively, and use their experience and knowledge that maximizes the value of the information in their decision making. © 2020 University of Maryland Global Campus All links to external sites were verified at the time of publication. UMGC is not responsible for the validity or integrity of information located at external sites. Learning Resource Print How Information Supports Decision Making Now that you have been introduced to the basics of data, how it can be stored, and the importance of data quality, let’s look at how data transformed into information supports organizational decision making. In their simplest form, information systems are all about getting the right information in the most usable format to the right people, at the right time and place. Advances in integrated software applications, the internet, and better data management practices provide businesses with better tools to support that goal. A key competitive advantage of an organization is the ability to react to changes quickly. Being able to make the right decision to address a potential threat or seize an opportunity could make the difference in whether or not the company stays in business or continues to increase profits. The key to making good decisions is having the relevant information readily available in the form that is needed. There are three basic levels of decision making in an organization: operational, managerial, and strategic as illustrated below. Let's look at the process of creating an invoice. An invoice contains several pieces of data, such as customer name, number, address, shipping method, items ordered, and quantities. This data is required at an operational level to update inventories, handle logistics, add to accounts receivable, and so forth. At the mid-level of our pyramid, the management level, the data from each individual invoice are not as important as the cumulative information that many invoices can provide. For example, sales have increased 25% on product A, orders for product B are shipping consistently behind schedule, and shipping costs with shipper X are increasing more than with other shippers. With this information on trends or patterns, management can investigate further and make decisions on production schedules, supplier relationships, or preferred shipping vendors. At the senior or executive level of an organization, the company leadership is less concerned than middle management about the trends or patterns—their concerns are strategic. Senior management looks at information, both from within the organization and external. For example, suppose a key component needed in the manufacturing process is petroleum-based. Rising oil prices, coupled with industry forecasts that prices will continue to rise, call for addressing this situation at a strategic level. Senior management might consider whether a price increase can be justified, how much of an increase the market can bear, or whether there are alternatives that would not degrade the product. A primary advantage of an information system is its ability to support and improve decision making throughout the organization by turning data into useful information. However, the system is just a tool and does not replace the human factor; people are still required to make the choices involved in the decisions. Individuals at all levels of the organization can use the information provided by the system as they make their decisions. In the invoice example above, the creation and use of the invoice data could all be done by hand, using paper invoices. However, the use of a system to capture, store, and share that information throughout the organization significantly increases the efficiency and effectiveness of the process and makes the information immediately and readily available to those who need it to make their decisions. We can see that information moves through the organization and is viewed for different purposes by different levels within the organization. However, the data are captured at the operational level (transaction-processing systems) and made available in appropriate forms (summary of product, customer, geographic distribution differences, and so on) at the various managerial levels. It is important to note that information can flow both up and down the levels within an organization. Information that is useful for monitoring ("How are we doing?") typically flows from the operational level upward. Control information ("Is business going as planned?") typically flows from the top level downward. For example, a senior manager notes that sales figures are declining. She queries down through the organization to find more information to control the declining sales. From mid-level management, she may learn that only the Midwest region is experiencing a decline. From the operational level, she may learn that the sales force in that region has had significant turnover and that 40 percent of its sales representatives have fewer than six months of experience. More specifically, let’s look at some examples of possible types of information and decisions different levels of the organization based on information from an invoice processing system based on the graphic above. Level Types of Information Area of Focus or Concern Decision Example Amount of increase in market share. Strategic Strategic Overall sales Decide to discontinue figures Monitor sales under-performing volume vs. projected products. sales. Determine manufacturing capacity Decide whether to requirements and reduce production of Overall Sales resource utilization. products that use Figures significant Identify increasing petroleum-based ingredients. costs of raw materials due to increased oil prices. Supporting Information from the IT System The system could produce a report of products where the sales volume is not meeting the projected volume. The system could provide a report on products that include more than 10% petroleum-based ingredients. Level Types of Information Area of Focus or Concern Decision Example Plan monthly production schedule. Managerial Monthly Invoices Decide to increase Schedule employees. production schedule to meet increased demands on certain Plan maintenance products. schedules. Supporting Information from the IT System The system would provide product sales volume information to indicate high-demand products. Manage inventory. Managerial Monthly Invoices Impact on monthly payroll; overtime hours worked. Decide to increase number of employees in certain departments to reduce excessive overtime. Update inventory, Decide to negotiate Operational Invoice Data schedule production. shipping rates with Coordinate shipping. most-used shippers. The system could provide a report indicating where sales exceeded projected demand by 15%. The system could produce a report of the volume of shipping done with each shipping vendor and their shipping rates. To provide a more personal example, think about the information you can gain from your online bank account system. The system can show your current balance, total of deposits, total of withdrawals, pending payments (if you use online bill paying), etc. Then based on information the system provides, you can make more informed decisions about your budgeting and spending. If the system showed information that last month your total withdrawals at ATM machines had increased significantly, on average you were hitting the ATM machine 3 or 4 times each week, and the withdrawals averaged $50 per withdrawal, you could decide to limit yourself to once-aweek ATM withdrawals of no more than $100. Further analysis of your spending habits could show a significant amount of money being spent daily on eating lunch out. You could then decide to pack your lunch two days a week. This shows how you could make fact-based decisions supported by information from the banking information system. Keep in mind that information technology is simply a tool. Knowing how to use the tool correctly is instrumental to overall effectiveness. The key to using IT successfully is knowing what data an information system contains and how the data can be converted into useful information to support decision making at each level in the organization. This helps organizations achieve their business strategy and maintain or increase its competitive advantage. © 2020 University of Maryland Global Campus All links to external sites were verified at the time of publication. UMGC is not responsible for the validity or integrity of information located at external sites. ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Final Answer

Attached.

1
Running head: TACTICAL LEVEL DECISION

Discussion Week 2
Name
Institutional Affiliation

2
TACTICAL LEVEL DECISION
Discussion Week 2
The retail selected for this discussion is McDonald's, and the chosen decision level is
tactical decisions. Tactical decisions are mid-term decision that spans for a quarter or one year.
These decisions are made within the bounds of the effective tactical supply chain decisions; in
other terms, they are made towards executing and achieving the strategic...

Cornell University

Anonymous
The tutor managed to follow the requirements for my assignment and helped me understand the concepts on it.

Anonymous
The tutor was knowledgeable, will be using the service again.

Anonymous
Awesome quality of the tutor. They were helpful and accommodating given my needs.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4
Similar Questions
Related Tags