Business Finance
Moral Intelligence 2 0 Enhancing Business Performance Book Critique Paper

Question Description

Need help with my Business question - I’m studying for my class.

Written Assignment (Critique)

Early in the term, you will have a small written assignment (not over 3 pages, double spaced, of text plus cover page). The assignment is a critique of Lennick & Kiel’s book, Moral Intelligence, Enhancing Business Performance & Leadership Success, one of the required texts for this course. This assignment will be due around the fourth week (see “” on our class webpage). The purpose of the critique is twofold---the book critiqued is timely and an easy read and you have a chance to submit a written project prior to submitting your research paper. As with all graduate work, the quality of your work is graded not only on the content of your submission (formal, graduate level) but on more concrete items such as spelling, punctuation, grammar, syntax, and readability/organization. You are encouraged to consider the grading rubric when organizing your work

Use this Dropbox to submit your critique of Moral Intelligence, Enhancing Business Performance & Leadership Success.

Submit your critique as a Word.doc.

Rubric

Critique

Critique

CriteriaRatingsPts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeCoverpage with name and honor code

10.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

10.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeContent & format per syllabus

20.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

20.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeGrammar, punctuation, & spelling

10.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

10.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeReadibility & organization (approach & content)

20.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

20.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMaster's (graduate) level work

40.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

40.0 pts

Total Points: 100.0

Unformatted Attachment Preview

More Praise for Moral Intelligence 2.0 “Lennick and Kiel demonstrate the critical importance of values-based leadership in building companies that last during difficult times. —Charles W. Sorenson, M.D., President and CEO, Intermountain Healthcare “Lennick and Kiel reveal the moral leadership practices of successful organizations. It’s fascinating to learn how moral intelligence drives business success at companies like Cardinal Health, American Express, and Hormel.” —Andrew Doman, President and CEO, Russell Investment Group “Moral Intelligence 2.0 has given me insights that will help us with the continued evolution of our business and will enhance our long-term survival and prosperity.” —Joe Dedin, Executive Director, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center “Rarely do books come out that become required reading for members of all Boards. Moral Intelligence 2.0 gives a masterly analysis of how to do the right thing in corporate life.” —Peter Hogarth, Former Director London Stock Exchange and Senior Partner, LVA Partners “I’ve discovered from this book that it is moral intelligence which I have found so critical to my years of leading others. This has surely been the formula for the success of my business.” —Dale Larson, Owner, Larson Doors, Inc. “Lennick and Kiel have brought focus to a subject has been undervalued for years. I found that if my senior team held firmly to these principles, we would safely navigate the most challenging of times. I strongly recommend this book for every CEO and leader in the business world.” —Richard Harrington, Retired CEO, Thomson Reuters “The value of emotional intelligence in leadership has been well documented, but in this book, Lennick and Kiel solidify the absolute correlation between moral intelligence and business performance. This should be required reading for leaders at all levels.” —Bill Shaner, President and CEO, Save-A-Lot Food Stores “The authors show that rather than slowing down a business, moral intelligence is essential to success—even in the most difficult of times and when the competition is fiercest.” —Gary Bhojwani, President and CEO, Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America “Lennick and Kiel provide a clear and compelling path for readers to understand the importance of strong moral values to their business and the way forward toward execution.” —Michael E. LaRocco, President and CEO, Fireman’s Fund Insurance “This important book challenges every leader, every citizen, to lead lives with purpose, intention, and a true north.” —Roger Fransecky, Ph.D., Founder and Senior Partner, LVA Partners “Lennick and Kiel confront leadership’s comfort levels with gritty questions such as whether alleged values are aligned with actual behavior. Moral Intelligence 2.0 is a no nonsense book to be valued by those willing to invest effort to achieve integrity and success.” —Michael Sabbeth, Esq., Author of The Good, The Bad, & The Difference: How To Talk With Children About Values “During these times of public mistrust and cynicism of government, corporate America, and mass media, this book is needed now more than ever. The companies highlighted by the authors are thriving examples that success and profit can be achieved without sacrificing integrity. Our business is our employees.” —Yvonne K. Franzese, Chief Human Resources Officer, Allianz of America Moral Intelligence 2.0 Enhancing Business Performance and Leadership Success in Turbulent Times Doug Lennick • Fred Kiel, Ph.D. with Kathy Jordan, Ph.D. Upper Saddle River, NJ • Boston • Indianapolis • San Francisco New York • Toronto • Montreal • London • Munich • Paris • Madrid Cape Town • Sydney • Tokyo • Singapore • Mexico City Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and the publisher was aware of a trademark claim, the designations have been printed with initial capital letters or in all capitals. The authors and publisher have taken care in the preparation of this book, but make no expressed or implied warranty of any kind and assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. No liability is assumed for incidental or consequential damages in connection with or arising out of the use of the information or programs contained herein. The publisher offers excellent discounts on this book when ordered in quantity for bulk purchases or special sales, which may include electronic versions and/or custom covers and content particular to your business, training goals, marketing focus, and branding interests. For more information, please contact: U.S. Corporate and Government Sales (800) 382-3419 corpsales@pearsontechgroup.com For sales outside the United States, please contact: International Sales international@pearson.com Visit us on the Web: informit.com/ph The Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication data is on file. Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This publication is protected by copyright, and permission must be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. For information regarding permissions, write to: Pearson Education, Inc. Rights and Contracts Department 501 Boylston Street, Suite 900 Boston, MA 02116 Fax (617) 671-3447 ISBN-13: 978-0-13-249828-9 ISBN-10: 0-13-249828-6 Text printed in the United States on recycled paper at R.R. Donnelley in Crawfordsville, Indiana. First printing April 2011 Associate Publisher: Tim Moore Executive Editor: Jim Boyd Development Editor: Russ Hall Managing Editor: Kristy Hart Project Editor: Jovana San Nicolas-Shirley Copy Editor: Apostrophe Editing Services Indexer: Erika Millen Proofreader: Water Crest Publishing Publishing Coordinator: Pamela Boland Cover Designer: Chuti Prasertsith Compositor: Nonie Ratcliff To our wives, Beth Ann Lennick and Sandy Kiel, who have helped us fine-tune our own moral compasses over the years—and to our children, who always lovingly challenge us to live in alignment! Alan, Mary, and Joanie (Doug) and Kelly, Amy, Bryn, Anna, Jordan and Freda (Fred)— and to our parents, whose early nurturing provided our foundation— Albert and Martha Lennick and Orville and Mabel Kiel This page intentionally left blank Contents Foreword by Richard Leider . . . . . . . . . xiii Foreword to Previous Edition by Richard E. Boyatzis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix Leaders Interviewed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxiv Thought Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvii PART ONE • MORAL INTELLIGENCE 1 Good Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Moral Stupidity Act 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 What Does Moral Leadership Look Like? . . . . . . 15 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2 Born to Be Moral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 What the Best Leaders Believe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 A Visit to the Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Nature Versus Nurture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Growing Up Moral. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Learning to Be Responsible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 When Things Go Wrong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Inside Your (Moral) Brain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 vii viii CONTENTS It’s All in Your Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 The Moral Map of Your Brain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Why We’re Good and Why We’re Bad . . . . . . . . . 46 So What Goes Wrong?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 The Neuroscience of Moral Decision Making . . . 48 Can We Actually Change Our Brain? . . . . . . . . . . 52 Moral Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 3 Your Moral Compass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 The Morality of Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Put It in Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Frame 3: Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4 Staying True to YourMoral Compass. . . . 81 Endnote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 PART TWO • DEVELOPING MORAL SKILLS 5 Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Acting Consistently with Principles, Values, and Beliefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Telling the Truth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Standing Up for What Is Right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Keeping Promises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 6 Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Taking Responsibility for Personal Choices . . . . 115 Admitting Mistakes and Failures. . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Embracing Responsibility for Serving Others . . . 121 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 CONTENTS 7 ix Compassion and Forgiveness . . . . . . . . 125 Actively Caring About Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Letting Go of Your Own Mistakes . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Letting Go of Others’ Mistakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 8 Emotions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Self-Awareness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Understanding Your Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Personal Effectiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Deciding What to Think . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Self-Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Nurturing Emotional Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Interpersonal Effectiveness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Empathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Misplaced Compassion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Respecting Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Getting Along with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Endnote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 9 Making Moral Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 How Roger Used the 4 Rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 PART THREE • MORAL LEADERSHIP 10 The Moral Leader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Performance Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Endnote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 x CONTENTS 11 Leading Large Organizations . . . . . . . . 197 The Fabric of Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Is There Such a Thing as a Morally Intelligent Organization?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 The Morally Intelligent Organization— An Aerial View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Morally Intelligent Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 The Principles That Matter Most . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Cultivating Organizational Integrity . . . . . . . . . . 203 The Responsible Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 The Compassionate Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 The Forgiving Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Recruiting for Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Reinforcing Values Starts at the Top . . . . . . . . . 218 The Power of Formal Rewards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Success Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Ideal Versus Real . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Values and the Global Organization . . . . . . . . . . 222 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 12 Moral Intelligence for the Entrepreneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Moral Values in Small Organizations. . . . . . . . . . 228 Last Words About Business Start-Ups . . . . . . . . 242 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Epilogue Becoming a Global Moral Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Raising the Stakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Watch Your Wake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Give Back. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Create the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 CONTENTS xi A Global Business Opportunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 A Strengthening Your Moral Skills . . . . . . 251 A Look in the Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Using the MCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 The Right Frame of Mind for Completing the MCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Scoring and Interpreting Your MCI . . . . . . . . . . 253 Prioritizing Your Moral Development Efforts. . . 254 The Road Less Traveled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 The 80/20 Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Your Moral Development Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Putting Your Moral Development Plan into Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Breaking Bad Habits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Reward Yourself for Positive Change . . . . . . . . . 259 Surround Yourself with Positive People . . . . . . . 259 Do I Really Need to Change? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Books, Audio, and Video Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Personal Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Executive Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Endnote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 B Moral Competency Inventory (MCI) . . . 263 C Scoring the MCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Moral Competencies Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 What Your Total MCI Score Means. . . . . . . . . . . 274 xii CONTENTS D Interpreting Your MCI Scores . . . . . . . 277 Total MCI Score (Alignment Score) . . . . . . . . . . 278 Highest and Lowest Competency Scores . . . . . . 279 Individual Item Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Reality Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Do Your Scores Matter? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Now What? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Foreword I find the wisdom of poets useful in my life and work. With a few words, the right poem at the right time can speak with a clear voice and help us see things new in the world. This poem by William Stafford provides us with a helpful place to return if we feel confused about a moral choice or challenge in the world. “The Way It Is” There’s a thread you follow. It goes among things that change. But it doesn’t change. People wonder about what you are pursuing. You have to explain about the thread. But it is hard for others to see. While you hold it you can’t get lost. Tragedies happen; people get hurt or die; and you suffer and get old. Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding. You don’t ever let go of the thread. —William Stafford Moral Intelligence 2.0 provides us with the helpful guidance to choose and to follow the “thread” of our own moral compass. Each day we face a series of “moral moments”—personal choice points. These are moments that require some decisions to serve others Credit: William Stafford, “The Way It Is,” from The Way It Is: New and Selected Poems. Copyright (cr) 1998 by the Estate of William Stafford. Reprinted with the permission of Graywolf Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.graywolfpress.org. xiii xiv MORAL INTELLIGENCE 2.0 or to be self-absorbed. We are likely, at times, to find ourselves in moral dilemmas. Each choice we make can feel as if we are either holding on to or letting go of our thread. We find the purpose path through our own life by following our own moral compass, holding on to our thread. How do we do such a thing? How do we follow some invisible thread that runs through our life? How can we even know it exists? One of the most helpful answers I can give is to simply read this book. It will help you look at the story of how your own life of moral intelligence has unfolded. It will help you see the thread that, perhaps invisible at the time, helped you choose whether to say yes or no, right or left. The authors have set out to illuminate a very complex subject—that of the moral compass in us all. And I found their insights revealing. Chapter 2 “Born to Be Moral” is worth the price of the book. I found myself again and again reflecting on the story, “A visit to the nursery.” The notion of our inborn capacity of empathy struck a deep chord within me. If we can trust that we are born “hardwired” to be moral, if we can trust that our hearts know how to recognize our thread, then this book will provide a blueprint, a manual of specifics to follow it. What practices, what knowledge or resource do we turn to in order to find our way? First, as the authors show us, we begin by choosing to uncover and express our purpose. Next, we clearly define the distinction between “how” we make choices, and “why” we make them. How often have we allowed the how of our choices to overshadow why we made them? Holding on to the thread, listening to your moral compass, may seem insignificant, but it is no small thing. It dramatically shifts the way we see, the way we choose, and the way we lead and live. It determines whether we lead a life of anxiety and stress or a spacious life of purpose and meaning. You don’t ever let go of the thread. FOREWORD xv Bottom-line thinking might now prevail, but the moral compass journey has deep roots. It also has deep resonance. One might say, in fact, that it’s not so much an idea whose time has come, as an idea that has always been with us—it’s just that we need to be reminded. I’m pleased that so many people’s lives have already been changed for the better through this reminder and I hope that the 2.0 edition will add to the number of those who are on the purpose path. —Richard Leider Bestselling author of The Power of Purpose and Repacking Your Bags Foreword to Previous Edition Building a Better Culture There are few issues with more significant impact on life in and out of organizations today than that of moral action. Crusades and jihads are moral righteousness taken to harmful and even evil extents—hurting others and demanding homogeneity of beliefs. The moral righteousness involved in trying to fix, save, or punish others has led to some of the most horrible episodes in human existence. Beyond the tragic loss of life, there is the subjugation of the human spirit. There is the loss of dreams and possibilities—the loss of spirit. Ironically, this travesty of moral imperialism comes at the same time as people worldwide are voicing the need for more spirituality and religion. Most of us know right from wrong. In hundreds of studies of the characteristics that differentiate outstanding from average leaders from their less effective counterparts (both average and poor performers), integrity has never appeared to distinguis ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Final Answer

Attached.

Book Critique: Moral Intelligence – Outline
I. Introduction to the book
II. Brief assertions on the book
III. Critique
IV. Conclusion


Running head: BOOK CRITIQUE: MORAL INTELLIGENCE

Book Critique: Moral Intelligence
Name
Institution

1

BOOK CRITIQUE: MORAL INTELLIGENCE

2

Book Critique: Moral Intelligence
Following a study of scientific literature in the disciplines of ethics, social biology,
cognitive development, linguistic anthropology, and physiology, Lennick and Kiel identified
only minimal work focused on statesmanship. They managed to perform in-depth interviews
with over thirty CEOs and nearly fifty other senior executives to learn how leaders used their
spiritual wisdom to accomplish personal and company objectives (Lennick & Kiel, 2011). Part
One describes moral intelligence and claims that spiritually acting is not only the best way to live
but also great for the company. The authors discuss how ethical competencies are formed in
humans and give psychological and neuro-scientific viewpoints. Lennick and Kiel describe
responsibility as a desire to take responsibility for the implications of acts and decisions, and to
acknowledge errors and failures. Kindness and acceptance indicate love for others (Lennick &
Kiel, 2011). Representatives who are merciful actively embrace their employee’s decisions an...

henryprofessor (72900)
Rice University

Anonymous
I was on a very tight deadline but thanks to Studypool I was able to deliver my assignment on time.

Anonymous
The tutor was pretty knowledgeable, efficient and polite. Great service!

Anonymous
Heard about Studypool for a while and finally tried it. Glad I did caus this was really helpful.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4
Similar Questions
Related Tags