Writing
GRC 600 CIU Consequences Outcomes & Ways to Avoid Plagiarism Essay

GRC 600

California Intercontinental University

GRC

Question Description

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This unit’s milestone project involves the creation of a five-page multiple source essay. After reviewing unit 6’s lecture videos and reading assignments, complete the following exercises starting on page 435 in Chapter 10:

EXERCISE 34: Understanding When to Document Information

EXERCISE 35: Understanding Plagiarism

EXERCISE 36: Identifying Plagiarism

Upon completing the exercises, reflect upon your essays for this course and create a few strategies you may consider using in future courses as to avoid accidental plagiarism. Produce a five-page multiple source essay stating your strategies, explaining their rationales, and their expected outcomes by adhering to the strategies. (You may even include a few examples from your previous essays!)

If you wish to cite (and reference) the videos for from this course as sources, then please use the APA way to reference a video.

Please note: The required page count does not include the title page and references. The body of the essay must be at least five pages in length.

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Unit 6 - Project Milestone This unit’s milestone project involves the creation of a five-page multiple source essay. After reviewing unit 6’s lecture videos and reading assignments, complete the following exercises starting on page 435 in Chapter 10: EXERCISE 34: Understanding When to Document Information EXERCISE 35: Understanding Plagiarism EXERCISE 36: Identifying Plagiarism Upon completing the exercises, reflect upon your essays for this course and create a few strategies you may consider using in future courses as to avoid accidental plagiarism. Produce a five-page multiple source essay stating your strategies, explaining their rationales, and their expected outcomes by adhering to the strategies. (You may even include a few examples from your previous essays!) If you wish to cite (and reference) the videos for from this course as sources, then please use the APA way to reference a video. Please note: The required page count does not include the title page and references. The body of the essay must be at least five pages in length. EXERCISE 34: Understanding When to Document Information Here are some facts about the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. Con- sider which of these facts would require documentation in a research essay— and why. 1. On January 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after takeoff from Cape Canaveral. 2. It was unusually cold in Florida on the day of the launch. 3. One of the Challenger’s booster rockets experienced a sudden and un- foreseen drop in pressure 10 seconds before the explosion. 4. The explosion was later attributed to the failure of an O-ring seal. 5. On board the Challenger was a $100 million communications satellite. 6. Christa McAuliffe, a high school social studies teacher in Concord, New Hampshire, was a member of the crew. 7. McAuliffe’s mission duties included conducting two classroom lessons taught from the shuttle. 8. After the explosion, classes at the high school were canceled. 9. Another crew member, Judith Resnick, had a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. 10. At the time of the explosion, President Ronald Reagan was preparing to meet with network TV news correspondents to brief them on the up- coming State of the Union address. 11. The State of the Union address was postponed for a week. EXERCISE 35: Understanding Plagiarism In 2003, the New York Times reported that Brian VanDeMark, an associate professor of history at the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA), had been charged with plagiarizing the content and language of portions of books by four authors. More than 40 passages in VanDeMark’s book about the origins of the atomic bomb were “identical, or nearly identical” to material published by the four authors, yet these passages contained neither acknowledgments nor quotation marks. In many instances, only a few words had been changed. The Chronicle of Higher Education later reported that, as a result of these charges, the USNA had demoted VanDeMark, removed his tenure, and cut his salary. In effect, he was going to have to “re-establish his professional qualifications” as if he had just been newly hired. Figure 10-1 shows, side by side, as published in the Times, parallel excerpts from VanDeMark’s Pandora’s Keepers: Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb on the left and from works by Robert S. Norris, William Lanouette, and Richard Rhodes on the right. Examine them and determine whether, in your opinion, VanDeMark has been guilty of plagiarism. EXERCISE 36: Identifying Plagiarism There are two ways to plagiarize the work of a source: using ideas without attribution and using language without quotation marks. A. The following passage, by John Lukacs, was one of the sources used for an essay titled “Has the Credit Card Replaced the Dollar Bill?” Compare this source with a paragraph taken from the student essay, and decide, sentence by sentence, whether the student has plagiarized Lukacs’s work. Source The Modern Age has been the age of money — increasingly so, perhaps reaching its peak around 1900. During the middle Ages, there were some material assets, often land, that money could not buy; but by 1900, there was hardly any material thing that money could not buy. But during the twentieth century, the value of money diminished fast. One symptom (and cause) was inflation. By the end of the twentieth century, the inflation of stocks and of other financial instruments became even more rapid than the inflation of money, at the bot- tom of which phenomenon another development exists, which is the increasingly abstract character of money — due, in part, to the increasing reliance on entirely electronic transactions and on their records. JOHN LUKACS, “It’s the End of the Modern Age,” Chronicle of Higher Education, 26 Apr. 2002, B8 Student Essay (1) For hundreds of years, we have lived in a society that worships money, believing that money can buy anything and everything. (2) A thousand years ago, during the middle Ages, there were some things, like land, that money could not buy. (3) But by 1900, money could buy almost any- thing one could want. (4) that is no longer so true today. (5) John Lukacs observes that, over the last century, the value of money diminished quickly. (6) The same is true for stocks and other financial instruments. (7) In fact, our dependence on credit cards and other electronic means of transferring funds has made paper money almost irrelevant (B8). B. The following two passages were among the sources used for an essay titled “Credentialing the College Degree.” Compare these sources with a paragraph taken from the student essay, and decide, sentence by sentence, whether the student has plagiarized either of these sources. Sources Grade inflation compresses all grades at the top, making it difficult to discriminate the best from the very good, the very good from the good, and the good from the mediocre. Surely a teacher wants to mark the few best students with a grade that distinguishes them from all the rest in the top quarter, but at Harvard that’s not possible. HARVEY C. MANSFIELD, “Grade Inflation: It’s Time to Face the Facts,” Chronicle of Higher Education, 5 Apr. 2001, B24 Grade inflation subverts the primary function of grades. Grades are messages. They are means of telling students—and subsequently, parents, employers, and graduate schools — how well or poorly those students have done. A grade that misrepresents a student’s performance sends a false message. It tells a lie. The point of using more than one passing grade (usually D through A) is to differentiate levels of successful performance among one’s students. Inflating grades to please or encourage students is confusing and ultimately self- defeating. RICHARD KAMBER AND MARY BIGGS, “Grade Conflation: A Question of Credibility,” Chronicle of Higher Education, 12 Apr. 2002, B14 Student Essay (1) some faculty are disturbed by what they regard as grade inflation. (2) They are concerned that grades will be awarded that are higher than students deserve, that will misrepresent a student’s performance. (3) Kamber and Biggs, for example, believe that an inflated grade is the equivalent of a lie, for it sends a “false message.” (4) Such faculty see themselves as differentiating between the different levels of successful performance, distinguishing, as Mansfield says, the best from the very good and the good from the mediocre. (5) In fact, they regard grades as a way of telling future employers how well or poorly these students have performed. (6) The emphasis is on providing students with credentials, not a successful learning experience. ...
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Final Answer

Hello, kindly find the attached completed work. Thank You

Running Head: PLAGIARISM

1

Plagiarism
Name
Institution of Affiliation
Date

PLAGIARISM

2
Introduction

Plagiarism has proved to be a significant menace in tertiary learning institutions.
Plagiarism is stealing another person's research/work. It also is referred to as using another
person's work without giving them credit for it. Plagiarism is a severe offense in education and
research institutions. It presents another person's ideas as the writer's own, which deprives the
original owner of the work credit for their efforts. To avoid plagiarism, a writer can cite the
source of the idea. By citing a design, you are acknowledging that the idea is not yours,
providing your audience on how to get the information. The offense of plagiarism is dealt with
differently depending on the context within which the data was produced. To avoid been
prosecuted, an individual should avoid using images, videos, and phrases from other people.
They can also seek permission from the producers and cite them if allowed.
Strategies of avoiding accidental plagiarism and their rationale
Paraphrasing will help a writer to avoid unintentional plagiarism. Paraphrasing refers to
using ideas and information from another writer but in your own words. Paraphrasing will help
me to portray the news I see fit for my work. I will mostly use it in situations where I find that
the data is perfect for research paper. The words to be used should not be similar to other
writer's work. Using more than two terms in a row from another writer can be referred to as
accidental plagiarism. Accidental plagiarism is using another person's ideas, work, or thoughts
unknowingly due to poor citing, referencing, and unorganized labor (Howard, 1992).
Paraphrasing will help me to portray the information from my perspective. It also helps the
reader of my work to connect with my thoughts and understand the idea I am trying to portray.
My lecturer will also be able to appreciate my ...

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