Business Finance
Unit 3 Chapter 9 Water Damage Workplace Communication Case Scenario

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I’m stuck on a Communications question and need an explanation.

Tutor_BeatriceN

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Slides in power point to know the information, terms, concepts, etc

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• You need to analyze the following message which certainly is not the correct way to provide a negative message or answer even it is necessary. • It must be change based in Business Communication – Negative message Instructions for writing. • Also, follow the slides to revise the message • The assignment is to re-write the message in a good and strategy way following the Chpater and notes about Negative message. • You can look in online the information about it. • ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Current date Ms. Mia Tranquillo 501 Westhampton Way Richmond, VA 23173 Dear Ms. Tranquillo: This letter is being sent to you to inform you that warranty repairs or replacements are not available for damage caused by operator fault. The dot inside your smartphone indicates in bright red that the device suffered prolonged exposure to liquid. The phone also shows signs of heavy external abuse—quite rightly excluded from coverage under your protection plan. Your phone retailer, Westhampton Wireless, at 422 Pleasant Valley Road, forwarded your device to us. Our service technician made an inspection. That’s when he discovered that your Zero Plus handset had not been treated with proper caution and care. He said he had never seen such a gunky phone interior, and that without a doubt the gadget was subjected to blunt force on top of that! You are lucky that the touch screen did not crack or break and that you didn’t lose all your data irretrievably since you apparently didn’t bother to arrange for a backup. Today’s smartphones are sophisticated high-tech devices. They must be handled with utmost respect. You wouldn’t believe how many users accidentally drop their phones into the toilet. The Peace of Mind Plan that you have purchased gets rave reviews from users. They love the protection their expensive equipment enjoys at a low monthly cost of $9.99. However, this plan plus the manufacturer’s warranty on your Zero Plus covers only this one thing: manufacturing defects. Your warranty has expired by now, but it wouldn’t cover neglect and abuse anyway. Your Peace of Mind Plan is in effect but only covers you for theft, loss, and malfunction. It explicitly excludes liquid and physical damage. In any case, there is always a deductible of $99. We can’t replace the Zero Plus at no charge, as you request. But we could sell you a remanufactured model, at a cost of $149 plus tax. Your other option is to purchase a new device at full retail cost. Furthermore, since you have a two-year contract, you will be eligible for an upgrade as you are nearing month 20. You could go to www.westhamptonwireless.com to browse new calling plans and see current smartphones and perhaps order a product or service online. Let us know what you want to do. We pride ourselves on our unparalleled customer service. Sincerely, Unit 3 Workplace Communication 1 Chapter 9 Negative Messages Student PowerPoint Library, 9e Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 2 Goals in Conveying Unfavorable News Explaining clearly and completely Conveying empathy and sensitivity Projecting a professional image Being fair Maintaining friendly relations Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 3 Applying the 3-x-3 Writing Process (1 of 5) Phase 1: Analyzing, Anticipating, and Adapting • Analyze the bad news. • Anticipate its effect on the receiver. • Announce the bad news directly if the disappointment will be mild. • Use techniques to reduce the pain if the bad news is serious. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 4 Applying the 3-x-3 Writing Process (2 of 5) Phase 2: Researching, Organizing, and Drafting • Gather information. • Brainstorm for ideas. • Jot down all reasons you have to explain the bad news. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 5 Applying the 3-x-3 Writing Process (3 of 5) Phase 2: Researching, Organizing, and Drafting • Present only the strongest and safest reasons. • Include ample explanation of the negative situation. • Avoid fixing blame. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 6 Applying the 3-x-3 Writing Process (4 of 5) Phase 3: Editing, Proofreading, and Evaluating • Read the message carefully to ensure that it says what you intend. • Check the wording to be sure you are concise without being abrupt. • Read the sentences to see if they sound like conversation and flow smoothly. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 7 Applying the 3-x-3 Writing Process (5 of 5) Phase 3: Editing, Proofreading, and Evaluating • Make sure the tone is friendly and respectful. • Check format, grammar, and mechanics. • Evaluate the message: Is it too blunt? Too subtle? Is it clear, but professional? Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 8 Avoiding Legal Liability in Conveying Negative News (1 of 2) Abusive language Including abusive language on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter Careless language Statements that are potentially damaging or subject to misinterpretation The good-guy syndrome Dangerous statements that ease your conscience or make you look good Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 9 Avoiding Legal Liability in Conveying Negative News (2 of 2) Express only the views of your organization when acting as agent of the organization. Avoid supplying information that could be misused. Use plain paper for your personal matters. Don’t admit or imply responsibility without checking with legal counsel. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 10 Analyzing Negative News Strategies Direct Strategy Indirect Strategy Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 11 When to Use the Direct Strategy Direct Strategy • When the bad news is not damaging • When the receiver may overlook the bad news • When the organization or receiver prefers directness • When firmness is necessary Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 12 When to Use the Indirect Strategy Indirect Strategy • When the bad news is personally upsetting • When the bad news will provoke a hostile reaction • When the bad news threatens the customer relationship • When the bad news is unexpected Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 13 Comparing Strategies for Delivering Negative News Direct Strategy Indirect Strategy Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 14 What Is a Buffer? • a device to reduce shock or pain • a neutral but meaningful statement that makes the reader continue reading • a concise, relevant first paragraph providing a natural transition to the explanation that follows Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 15 Presenting the Reasons for the Negative News • • • • • Explain the reasons leading up to the no clearly. Cite reader benefit or benefits to others, if plausible. Explain the rationale behind your company’s policy. Choose positive words to keep the reader in a receptive mood. Show fairness and serious intent. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 16 Closing Pleasantly Forward Look Anticipate future relations or business. Alternative Give follow-through advice or offer an alternative, if available. Good Wishes Express sincere feelings, e.g., thank the reader, if applicable. Freebies Send a coupon, sample, or gift, if available, to restore confidence. Resale or Sales Promotion Invite the reader to consider your other products or services. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 17 Saying No to Typical Requests and Claims Requests for favors, money, information, and action Invitations Claims from disappointed customers Serious problems with orders Rate increases and price hikes Credit refusals Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 18 Dealing With Unhappy Customers in Print and Online (1 of 3) Call or e-mail the individual or reply to his or her online post within 24 hours. Describe the problem and apologize. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 19 Dealing With Unhappy Customers in Print and Online (2 of 3) Explain the following: Why the problem occurred What you are doing to resolve it How you will prevent it from happening again Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 20 Dealing With Unhappy Customers in Print and Online (3 of 3) Promote goodwill by following up with a message that documents the phone call or acknowledges the online exchange of posts. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 21 Responding by E-Mail and in Hard Copy Written messages are important in these situations: When you cannot reach the customer personally. When you wish to confirm follow-up procedures. When you need to establish a record of the incident. When you want to promote good relations. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 22 Why Consumers Complain Online Customers may receive faster responses to tweets than to customer service calls. Griping in public may help other consumers avoid the same problems. Public complaints can improve the complainer’s leverage in solving a problem. Sending a 140-character tweet is much easier than writing a complaint e-mail. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 23 Managing Negative News Online What smart businesses do: • Recognize social networks as an important communication channel. • Become proactive and join the fun. • Monitor and embrace comments. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 24 Handling Problems With Orders Use the direct strategy if the message has some good-news elements. The indirect strategy may be more appropriate when the message is disappointing. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 25 Managing Bad News in Organizations Telling the boss that something went wrong. Confronting an employee about poor performance. Announcing declining profits, lost contracts, harmful lawsuits, public relations controversies, and changes in policy. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 26 Delivering Bad News in Person Use the indirect strategy if you know the news will upset the receiver. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 27 Delivering Bad News to Individuals or Groups Explain past, present, and future. Prepare and rehearse. Gather all the information. Consider taking a partner. Think about timing. Be patient with the reaction. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 28 Delivering Bad News to Employees and the Public Smart organizations involved in a crisis usually communicate the news openly. Managers explain the organization’s side of the story honestly and promptly. Morale can be destroyed when employees learn bad news through the grapevine or from media. Whenever possible, management may want to deliver bad news personally. Organizations deliver bad news through multiple channels, print and digital. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 29 Saying No to Job Applicants To reduce the receiver’s disappointment, employers use the indirect strategy but keep the reasons intentionally vague. To avoid charges of discrimination or wrongful actions, organizations keep employment rejection messages general, simple, and short. Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 30 End Guffey/Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 9th Edition. © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 31 ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Current date
Ms. Mia Tranquillo
501 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA 23173

Dear Ms. Tranquillo,
I want to first begin by saying thank you for allowing us to look at your device. Our technician took extra
care while reviewing your device. There was some damage noted. In smartphones, there is a water
damage indicator and our technician did see that the dot inside your smartphone was bright red, this
typically indicates that there was water damage. I apologize for the inconvenience and I do have to let
you know that your warranty plan does not cover water damage. However, there are...

nixiypixiy (2125)
UC Berkeley

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