Humanities
GEN 103 Ashford University Hello MOTHERHOOD Website CRAAP Test Paper

ashford university

Question Description

I need support with this English question so I can learn better.

The CRAAP Test [WLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4] [CLOs: 1, 3, 4]

Prepare iconPrepare:
Reflect.pngReflect:
  • Reflect on the elements of the CRAAP test and how each one indicates the credibility and reliability of a source.
  • Consider how your evaluation of each of these elements affects your understanding of the strength of the source.
  • Think about why it is important to evaluate any web page that you plan to rely on for information.
Write.pngWrite:
  • Apply the CRAAP test to your source.
    • For each of the CRAAP criteria, start a new paragraph.
    • In each paragraph, state which criterion you are addressing and evaluate the source based on that criterion.
    • Provide specific examples to support your evaluation.
  • Evaluate your source’s overall strength based on the elements of the CRAAP test. Is this source appropriate to use in answering to your research question, why or why not?
  • Explain one thing you have learned from the process of doing this CRAAP test.
  • Provide a properly formatted APA reference to the web page at the end of your initial post.Your initial post must be at least 350 words and address all of the prompt’s elements.You must cite and reference any sources that you use in your posts, including your textbook or any other sources of information that you use. Please refer to the Writing Center’s Citing Within Your Paper (Links to an external site.) and Formatting Your References List (Links to an external site.) for help with citing and referencing your sources.

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3/25/2020 Evaluating Info - Literature Reviews - LibGuides at CSU, Chico Literature Reviews A guide with information on how to write a literature review. The CRAAP Test Are your sources credible and useful, or are they a bunch of . . .?! The CRAAP Test is a list of questions that help you determine if the sources you found are accurate and reliable. Keep in mind that the following list is not static or complete. Different criteria will be more or less important depending on your situation or need. Key: * indicates criteria is for Web sources only Currency: The timeliness of the information. When was the information published or posted? Has the information been revised or updated? Is the information current or out-of date for your topic? Are the links functional? * Relevance: The importance of the information for your needs. Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question? Who is the intended audience? Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)? Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use? Would you be comfortable using this source for a research paper? Authority: The source of the information. Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor? Are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations given? What are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations given? What are the author's qualifications to write on the topic? Is there contact information, such as a publisher or e-mail address? Does the URL reveal anything about the author or source? examples: .com .edu .gov .org .net * Accuracy: The reliability, truthfulness, and correctness of the informational content. Where does the information come from? Is the information supported by evidence? Has the information been reviewed or refereed? Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge? Does the language or tone seem biased and free of emotion? libguides.csuchico.edu/LiteratureReviews?p=2822716 1/2 3/25/2020 Evaluating Info - Literature Reviews - LibGuides at CSU, Chico Are there spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors? Purpose: The reason the information exists. What is the purpose of the information? to inform? teach? sell? entertain? persuade? Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear? Is the information fact? opinion? propaganda?Does the point of view appear objective and impartial? Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional, or personal biases? Meriam Library | CSU, Chico libguides.csuchico.edu/LiteratureReviews?p=2822716 2/2 3/25/2020 Print Module 3 Evaluating Information (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/mod03intro#mod03intro) ections/mod3.1#mod3.1) (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/mod3.2#mod3.2) ections/mod3.3#mod3.3) (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/mod3.4#mod3.4) ections/mod3.5#mod3.5) https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 1/37 3/25/2020 Print (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/mod3.6#mod3.6) ections/mod3.7#mod3.7) (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/mod03summary#mod03summary) Learning Outcomes Describe what the CRAAP test is and how it is used to evaluate information. Identify the criteria used to evaluate the currency of information. Identify the criteria used to evaluate the relevance of information. Identify the criteria used to evaluate the authority of information. Identify the criteria used to evaluate the accuracy of information. Identify the purpose behind the creation of information. Identify the criteria used to evaluate multimedia found on the Web. https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 2/37 3/25/2020 Print Introduction Now that you have learned about the irst two steps in the research processes—identifying an information need and locating and accessing information—it’s time to explore the third step in the process, which is evaluating information. The process you employ for selecting information should follow a list of criteria that ensure you’re choosing only the best sources. These criteria are currency, relevance, authority, accuracy, and purpose. They are collectively—and humorously—known as the CRAAP test. Your Roadmap to Success (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/s ections/preface#preface) https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 3/37 3/25/2020 Print Your Roadmap to Success: Section 3.1 Learning Outcome: Describe what the CRAAP test is and how it is used to evaluate information. Why is this important? Understanding the CRAAP test will help you sort through vast amounts of information so that you can ind the information that’s important to you. Consider Crystal, for example. Crystal was looking for a new job. She found many job ads online and spent a lot of time applying to them. However, she didn’t get many responses and was feeling frustrated. The few responses she did receive turned out to be not what they seemed. After learning the CRAAP test, she realized that many of the job ads were likely scams or outdated. She now uses the CRAAP test to evaluate job ads and has had much better results conducting a targeted job search. How does this relate to your success in this course? This section’s learning outcome is associated with the following course learning outcome: Determine the best search strategy for a given information need. Mastering this learning outcome will enable you to save time in your busy life so that you can balance the needs of school, work, family, and other commitments. To review the course learning outcomes and their relevance to you, see the Your Roadmap to Success (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/sections/preface#roadmap) feature at the beginning of this book. Best of luck on your journey to success! The explosive growth and use of the Internet in the 21st century has had a profound effect on how people access, interpret, and use information. In 2014, almost 3 billion people used the Internet worldwide (International Telecommunication Union, 2014). People turn to the Internet to help them ind information for everything from the location of restaurants to instructions on starting their own business to possible reasons for that curious rash on their big toe. In addition, of course, students turn to the Internet to ind resources for their academic papers (Head, 2013). The International Reading Association states, “. . . networked communication technologies such as the Internet provide https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 4/37 3/25/2020 Print the most powerful capabilities for information and communication we have ever seen, permitting access to people and information in ways and at speeds never before possible” (2009). Just as people are able to explore and discover overwhelming amounts of data and information on the Internet, they are also able to create new information quickly and easily by publishing their work on the Web. This ease of publishing by anyone, while good for self-expression and the sharing of ideas, has implications for the reliability of what can be found on the Internet. When anyone can publish anything on the Internet, a great deal of unreliable and subjective information is created. Ashford Student Pro ile: Natasha Natasha has just submitted her inal paper for her Health & Wellness Promotion class, and she’s feeling con ident. She was able to ind several scholarly articles and e-books in the AU Library as well as plenty of resources she found on the Internet to back up her claims about the best approaches to teaching healthy nutrition habits to college freshmen. When her graded paper came back, she was surprised to see she had earned only a C, when she had felt so strongly that she was surely getting an A. After further inspecting her paper, she saw that the instructor had deducted points for the resources she found on the Internet and the arguments she had based off those sources. Natasha was confused; the instructor clearly stated that resources found on the Internet were permitted for this assignment in addition to scholarly material. Why was she docked points? When she read through her instructor’s comments, she found comments such as “this teaching method is not used by health promotion professionals because recent research has shown it encourages disordered eating behavior in college freshmen” and more comments such as “according to who?” or “please back up with facts, not opinions.” When Natasha scrolled to the end of her paper, she saw that the instructor had written a inal comment saying that if she was going to use resources from the Internet, she should make sure she was using the most updated information from credible, authoritative entities. For example, sources might include the American College Health Association, the Centers for Disease Control, scholarly articles from PubMed, or other open source scholarly resources. Instead, Natasha had used information from websites such as nutrition blogs by unknown, self-proclaimed “health experts,” promoting and selling diet foods, and an article written by a registered dietitian in 1991. As a result, the claims she made based on those sources were biased, outdated, and probably inaccurate. Because Natasha had found so much information on her topic on the Internet, it was dif icult to know what to choose, so she had gone with what came up on her irst page of results, as so many of us do. By the same token, more and more entities (professional organizations, academic journals, and government departments) that are considered highly authoritative are publishing on the Web. How do you know whether the information is sound? Many have claimed that new literacy skills are needed to effectively navigate and use this new information landscape. Being able to evaluate information found on the Web is absolutely critical not only for your academic life, but also for your workplace and personal life (International Reading Association, 2009; Leu, et al., 2011). The CRAAP test is a method that you can use to help evaluate information from both print and digital sources while in search for the truth. Developed by the Meriam Library at California State University in Chico, the CRAAP test is a list of questions that you can use to evaluate a source’s currency, reliability, authority, accuracy, and purpose (Figure 3.1). When used in conjunction with your critical thinking skills, the CRAAP test can be an effective method for determining the validity of a resource. Figure 3.1 The CRAAP test Currency: The timeliness of the information. When was the information published or posted? https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 5/37 3/25/2020 Print Has the information been revised or updated? Is the information current or out-of date for your topic? Are the links functional? Relevance: The importance of the information for your needs. Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question? Who is the intended audience? Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e., not too elementary or advanced for your needs)? Have you looked at a variety of resources before determining this is one you will use? Would you be comfortable using this resource for a research paper? Authority: The source of the information. Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor? Are the author’s credentials or organizational af iliations given? What are the author’s credentials or organizational af iliations? What are the author’s quali ications to write on the topic? Is there contact information, such as a publisher or email address? Does the URL reveal anything about the author or source (e.g., .com, .edu, .gov, .org, .net)? Accuracy: The reliability, truthfulness, and correctness of the informational content. Where does the information come from? Is the information supported by evidence? Has the information been reviewed or refereed? Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge? Does the language or tone seem biased and free of emotion? Are there spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors? Purpose: The reason the information exists. What is the purpose of the information? To inform? Teach? Sell? Entertain? Persuade? Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear? Is the information fact? Opinion? Propaganda? Does the point of view appear objective and impartial? Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional, or personal biases? Quick Tip! https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 6/37 3/25/2020 Print Locating Stable Information Information you locate on the Internet may not be stable. That is, it can move or disappear without warning, making any links you use to cite your information invalid. Information you ind on websites owned by the United States government, large business or nonpro it organizations, or educational institutions is usually more stable and therefore less likely to disappear. Additionally, these sites often archive their information, so even if their information has been updated or moved, it may still be accessible. While the CRAAP test can be applied to evaluate both print and digital resources, the remainder of this module focuses on exploring how you can apply the CRAAP test to evaluate digital information you ind on the Internet outside the AU Library. Remember from Module 2 that the gold standard for quality information is scholarly/peer-reviewed research, some of which you can ind on the Internet. Also keep in mind that conducting good research means that the search for knowledge should not be to reinforce what you already know, but to locate many perspectives in search of the truth. Before exploring the CRAAP test, let’s check back in with Irwin, as he begins his quest for information online. When we left him, he had collected a few scholarly articles from the AU Library on the topic of social networking in the workplace, and was gathering information from them through note taking. He decides to look over his assignment instructions and starts checking off the resource requirements he has ful illed. Irwin’s assignment requires that he use his course textbook, two scholarly sources, and one source of his choice in the development of his paper. Irwin has already extracted the information he needs from his textbook, and he has the scholarly articles he found in the AU Library. The last resource he needs can be in the format of his choice. On his KWHL chart, Irwin listed that he would like to try locating information for his research paper from podcasts and websites about social networking (see Table 3.1). Table 3.1: Irwin’s updated KWHL chart K What do I know? Social networking has been around for at least 10 years. It’s useful for staying in touch with friends and family. It helps me keep up with groups and organizations I’m interested in. Some of the gaming systems I use have social networks built in. W What do I want to know? H How do I ind out? How do others use social networking? Background research: Wikipedia & Google Has it been around for longer than 10 years? Scholarly sources from the library/FindIt@AU: 1 e-book, 3 scholarly articles Does it impact my life the same way as it does others in society? Internet sources: websites, podcasts L What have I learned? SNs have been around since the late 1800s. Currently, many SNs exist for a wide range of purposes. What are popular social networking tools? Has social networking evolved with society? What are popular social networking tools in the workplace? How are companies using social networks to enhance their organizations? Irwin knows that he needs to be careful when using the Internet to search for resources for his paper. He has an idea of how to evaluate the validity of a resource, but he would like to learn more. In the following sections, we take a closer look at how the CRAAP test can help Irwin locate solid resources for his paper. https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 7/37 3/25/2020 Print https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 8/37 3/25/2020 Print Your Roadmap to Success: Section 3.2 Learning Outcome: Identify the criteria used to evaluate the currency of information. Why is this important? Being able to determine the currency of information will prevent you from making decisions that are based on outdated information. Consider Ron, for example. Ron wants to eat healthier and has been using a health book he found in his closet to help him plan meals. However, after he learned the importance of having current information, he checked the copyright and realized the book had been published over 20 years ago and thus might have outdated information that might deter him in his quest to eat healthier. How does this relate to your success in this course? This section’s learning outcome is associated with the following course learning outcome: Evaluate information sources for authority, bias, accuracy, and currency. Mastering this learning outcome will help you identify threats and misleading or outdated information that could jeopardize your schoolwork, as well as your personal life. To review the course learning outcomes and their relevance to you, see the Your Roadmap to Success (http://content.thuzelearning.com/books/AUGEN103.15.2/sections/preface#roadmap) feature at the beginning of this book. Best of luck on your journey to success! The Internet can be an excellent place to ind the most cutting-edge, up-to-date information, as new content is constantly being published. This is especially true for information on current events, such as news, stock market activity, weather, and traf ic conditions. The Internet is also an excellent place to ind archival and historical documents, rare books, or other special collections that once were available only as print sources in libraries. In short, you can ind all kinds of information created or posted at different times on the Internet, so how do you know if what you ind is current enough for your topic? Determining the currency of information will depend on the subject you are researching. Decide Between Older and Newer Sources https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUGEN103.15.2?sections=mod03,mod03intro,mod3.1,mod3.2,mod3.3,mod3.4,mod3.5,mod3.6,mod3.7,mod03sum… 9/37 3/25/2020 Print When setting out to ind information on the Web or when evaluating results from a search, you should determine whether it is necessary to get the most up-to-date material based on your information need. For certain subjects, such as history or the humanities, documents created hundreds of years ago can be valuable to your research today. They include old letters, legal documents such as birth and marriage certi icates and court and military records, and contemporary newspaper accounts of rel ...
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Running head: WEEK 4 DISCUSSION POST

Uniform in School
Greene, Shandalee
GEN103: Information Literacy
Professor Maria Sonntag

1

WEEK 4 DISCUSSION POST

2

The webpage that I have selected based on my research question is from the “hello
MOTHERHOOD” website (Armstrong, 2018). It is part of the motherhood fact sheets about
toddlers and parenthood. My research question is; how do uniforms negatively impact the
education of children? Do school uniforms affect children’s behavior and how it impacts their
learning, especially when it comes to what age they are and whe...

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