Humanities
Los Angeles Southwest College Impact of The Call to Love Our Enemies Paper

Los Angeles Southwest College

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I’m working on a Philosophy exercise and need support.

I would like to write 2 essays each one different than others, in the same topic.

The essays should be about 500-700 words,

typed and double-spaced in 12-point font with one-inch margins.

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please don't bring any information from the internet.

the answer should be from the resource that I will give you.

................

this is the question

How might the so-called “love command of Jesus” – the call to love our enemies – reshape the way we think about what love is?

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Session Twenty-eight 03/23/2020 Love gets real: the challenge of loving our enemies “Love… is the fundamental and innate vocation of every human being.” Pope John Paul II Familaris Consortio “If you do not love, you will not be human. If you love effectively, you will be killed.” Herbert McCabe “If your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink.” Saint Paul Romans 12:20 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) • Morehouse College – 1948 • Crozer Theological Seminary – 1951 • Boston University (PhD) – 1955 • Nobel Peace Prize – 1964 • Assassinated – 1968 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhMNr9NtSD0 “Loving Your Enemies” Dr. King delivered several versions of this sermon over the course of his public life. The pdf version you have is the transcript of an audio recording from the version he preached November 17, 1957 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. To listen to part of it (whch you really should do), check this out. (Note that some of the excerpts on the following slides come from a somewhat different version). First question: Do you see anything like McCabe’s claim—or his warning—in Dr. King’s sermon? You hopefully noticed that Dr. King’s sermon is a riff on the Sermon on the Mount, especially 5:43-48. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous… Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” From Matthew 5:43-48 Killing the Sermon on the Mount: •For much of Christian history the Sermon on the Mount has been wrongly dismissed: •As utopian •As impossible •As designed to cause us to despair over its impossibility and so to throw ourselves at God’s feet begging for mercy. Killing the Sermon on the Mount: •Catholics have tended to regard the Sermon on the Mount as the basis for a life based on the “counsels of evangelical perfection,” reserved for the religious (priests, monks, and nuns). •Protestants have tended to regard the Sermon on the Mount as belonging to the realm of law, rather than gospel. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) The 20th century American theologian called the “love command” of Jesus an “impossible ethical ideal” that “transcends the possibilities of human life.” To which Dr. King replies… “Upheaval after upheaval has reminded us that modern man is traveling along a road called hate, in a journey that will bring us to destruction and damnation…” “Far from being the pious injunction of a Utopian dreamer, the command to love one’s enemy is an absolute necessity for our survival… Jesus is not an impractical idealist: he is the practical realist.” “So when Jesus said ‘Love your enemy,’ he was not unmindful of its stringent qualities. Yet he meant every word of it.” Second question: Dr. King proposes three broad guidelines in response to the question “How do we love our enemies?” What are these guidelines? How do we love our enemies? 1. We must forgive their wrongdoings against us. 2. We must see our enemies fully as the persons they are – that they are more than their sins. 3. We must treat our enemies with goodwill and unconditional love—we must love them as God loves them. “… for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.” Matthew 5:45 Third question: So, let’s say it’s possible to love our enemies. But why should we love them? What’s the utility of doing so? Why should we love our enemies? Why should we love our enemies? 1. Loving enemies breaks the spiral of violence. “Returning hate for hate only multiplies hate.” Why should we love our enemies? 1. Loving enemies breaks the spiral of violence. 2. Hate is fundamentally harmful to the one who hates his or her enemy. “Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man’s sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.” Why should we love our enemies? 1. Loving enemies breaks the spiral of violence. 2. Hate is fundamentally injurious to the one who hates his or her enemy. 3. Hate cannot transform hate; love alone can overcome and transform hate. “We never get rid of an enemy by meeting hate with hate; we get rid of an enemy by getting rid of enmity. By its very nature, hate destroys and tears down; by its very nature, love creates and builds up. Love transforms with redemptive power.” “We are called to this difficult task in order to realize a unique relationship with God. We are potential sons of God. Through love that potentiality becomes actuality. We must love our enemies, because only by loving them can we know God and experience the beauty of his holiness.” Fourth question: Do you have enemies? What do you see as the primary obstacle to loving them? “My friends, we have followed the so-called practical way for too long a time now, and it has led inexorably to deeper confusion and chaos.” “To our most bitter opponents we say: ‘We shall match your capacity to inflict suffering by our capacity to endure suffering. We shall meet your physical force with soul force… Throw us in jail, and we shall still love you. Send your hooded perpetrators of violence… at the midnight hour and beat us and leave us half dead, and we shall still love you. But be ye assured that we will wear you down by our capacity to suffer.’” Fifth question: What do you make of Dr. King’s claim “that we will wear you down by our capacity to suffer”? Do you find any precedents, in scripture or elsewhere? Does it make any sense to you? Pastor André Trocmé (1901-1971) • Pastor of the Protestant Church at Le Chambon sur Lignon, France. • Pacifist. • Led the members of his congregation in sheltering more than 3,500 Jews from the Nazis from 1941-1944. • In 1971, the Holocaust memorial in Israel, Yad Vashem, recognized him as “Righteous among the Nations.” “The duty of Christians is to resist the violence that will be brought to bear on their consciences through the weapons of the spirit. We shall resist when our adversaries will demand of us obedience contrary to the orders of the Gospel. We shall do so without fear, but also without pride and without hatred” André Trocmé the French with Nazi Germany From a sermon delivered the day after signed a treaty of armistice Wendell Berry says that Jesus’ call to love our enemies is: “the greatest challenge ever laid before us, the most comprehensive vision of human progress, the best advice, and the least obeyed.” What do you say? ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

The impact of the call to love our enemies outline
I.

Introduction

While Jesus' understanding of love settles beyond human comprehension, it does remind us that
love requires us to put our emotions aside, lend ourselves to its sacrificial nature, and appreciate
its unconditionality.
II.

Body
A. One of the things that the love your enemy command tells us about the nature of love
is that love is more significant than our emotions and grudges
B. Love is also unconditional
C. Love requires a lot of sacrifices

III.

Conclusion

IV.

Reference


The impact of “to love your enemies” on our perception of love
I.

Introduction

The commandment about loving our enemies reminds us that love is unconditional, transcends
our emotions, and is sacrificial.
II.

Body
A. Indeed, love is unconditional
B. Love also transcends our emotions
C. Love is also a sacrifice

III.

Conclusion

IV.

Reference


THE LOVE COMMAND

1

The impact of “to love your enemies” on our perception of love
Name
Institution affiliated

THE LOVE COMMAND

2

The impact of “to love your enemies” on our perception of love
Introduction
Loving one's enemies is one of the most challenging things to do, yet the Bible demand
exactly that of human beings. The Bible is clear about feeding our enemies if they are hungry,
including giving them “something to drink” for their thirst (Lecture slide 4). Jesus’
commandment about love diverts from the human and practical understanding of love, which, in
most cases, focuses on loving one’s neighbor and hating enemies (Lecture slide 9). The
commandment about loving our enemies reminds us that love is unconditional, transcends our
emotions, and is sacrificial.
The impact of Jesus’ command on how we perceive love
Indeed, love is unconditional. Jesus' commandment about loving our enemies reshapes
the human understanding of love. Typically, we want to associated love with people who are
close to us, including our family members, close friends, and even intimate partners. Putting
conditions on who one can love, such as only restricting love to a family or one's spouse, beats
the logic behind Jesus' definition of love. According to Jesus, love needs not to have conditions
to it (Lecture slide 18). His commandment challenges people to break all the terms they have set
against love. His use of an "enemy" could have been a way of reminding us that love does not
include conditions. God is an...

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