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Cedar Crest College Competent Listening and Incompetent Listening Questions

Cedar Crest College

Question Description

I need an explanation for this Communications question to help me study.

A successful journal entry will:

-Be three to five pages in length. Write more rather than less. Dig into the content and engage in deep thinking.

-Answer all the sub-questions and/or activities included within the prompt question.

-Utilize course content – concepts and theories. Use bold type for the terms. Define the term in your own words to demonstrate your understanding of the meaning. This definition should be placed within ( ). Focus on using a minimum of five to ten terms per entry.

-Provide specific examples of your own communication. Develop these examples with sufficient detail to make them vivid and concrete.

-Include the specific question/activity on the top of each entry.

-If an activity (in the textbook) is to be completed, include all your answers for that activity in your journal.

-If questions are included with an activity, be sure to write a thoughtful and developed reflection from the question prompts.

Ch#7 Skill Practice 7.4 Writing Questions and Paraphrases p. 220-221. Write out the responses for the activity. Now write a reflection on: How does questioning and paraphrasing increase communication competence? Provide examples of when you listened competently and examples of when you were a passive listener or failed to listen effectively. (Provide a well-developed answer using personal examples from your own communication.)

When writing the Feeling Paraphrases be careful to identify your perception of the other person's feelings and not yours. For instance " From what you are saying it seems that you feel frustrated and scared." instead of "I get the feeling that you don't like it."

Write, " I am sensing that you are scared." instead of "I feel like you are scared."

Focus on distinguishing real feeling descriptions from opinion "I think" statements.

For students who do not have the textbook and are still waiting to access the FREE on-line version of the textbook, use this as your prompt:

What is competent listening? How is competent listening different than incompetent listening?

What are the different listening styles and what are the benefits and deficiencies of each one? Which styles are you most competent in? Provide examples of interactions where you engaged in these listening styles.

What is Active listening? What is Question for Clarification? Content Paraphrase? Feeling Paraphrase? What are the benefits of using these strategies? Provide a detailed example where you demonstrated Active listening with at least one concrete and specific example of a Question, Content Paraphrase and Feeling Paraphrase.

Provide an example of when you were a passive or incompetent listener. How did your communication impact the conversation and relationship with your partner? What would you have liked to have done better?

How do your listening skills impact social, romantic, and work relationships?

****Be sure to identify and apply course content throughout the reflection. I encourage you to use the Chapter Outlines to identify useful course terminology.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Chapter 7 Outline (Italicized words are key words) I. Listening is the process of receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and/or nonverbal messages. A. There are personal and cultural styles of listening; a listening style is your favored but usually unconscious approach to attending to your partner’s messages 1. A content-oriented listening style means that we prefer to focus on the facts and evidence in a message. 2. A people-oriented listening style is a preference to focus on what the message tells them about our conversational partners and their feelings. 3. An action-oriented listening style is a preference for focusing on the point that the speaker is trying to make with a message. 4. A time-oriented listening style is a preference for brief and swift conversations. B. Listening apprehension is the anxiety we feel about listening that interferes with our ability to be effective listeners. C. A dual processes in listening means that we use one of two approaches to process the information that we receive—automatic or conscious. 1. Passive listening is the effortless, thoughtless, and habitual process of receiving the messages we hear. 2. Active listening is the skillful, intentional, deliberate, conscious process of attending to, understanding, remembering, critically evaluating, and responding to messages that we hear. a. Attending is the process of willful striving to perceive selected sounds that are being heard. 1. Getting ready to attend means preparing physically and mentally. 2. Though we physically register any sounds emitted within our hearing range, we can exercise psychological control over the sounds we attend to. 3. Making the shift from speaker to listener a complete one means listening and not preparing for the next remark. 4. Stay tuned in since you may miss something and not have all the data needed to understand the message. b. Understanding is the process of accurately decoding a message so that the meaning is shared with the speaker and understanding what is being said. 1. To improve understanding, identify the speaker’s purpose and key points, interpret nonverbal cues, ask clarifying questions, and paraphrase what is heard. 2. To understand what a speaker means, one must be able to accurately interpret nonverbal cues. 3. Ask clarifying questions, which are designed to get further information or to remove uncertainty from information already received, in order to encourage the speaker to continue speaking, which can aid in transmitting the intended meaning. a. Be specific about what you need to increase your understanding. b. Deliver questions in a sincere tone of voice. c. Limit the number of questions or explain that you need to ask multiple questions. d. Put the “burden of ignorance” on your shoulders to minimize unplanned or unwanted reactions. 4. Another way to assure understanding is to paraphrase—an attempt to verify one’s understanding of a message by putting it into one’s own words and sharing it with the speaker. a. A content paraphrase conveys one’s understanding of the denotative meaning of a verbal message. b. A feelings paraphrase conveys one’s understanding of the emotional meaning behind the speaker’s verbal message. c. A combined paraphrase conveys one’s understanding of both the denotative and emotional meanings behind a speaker’s message. c. The third part of the active listening process is remembering—the process of moving information from short-term memory to long-term memory. 1. Primacy effect is the tendency to remember information that we heard first over what we heard in the middle. 2. Recency effect is the tendency to remember information that we heard last over what we heard in the middle. a. Repetition is saying something two, three, or even four times and helps store information in long-term memory. b. A mnemonic device is an artificial technique used as a memory aid (e.g., take the first letter of each of the items you are trying to remember and form a word). IX. c. Taking notes represents a powerful tool for increasing recall of information. d. The fourth part of the active listening process is critically evaluating, which is the process of interpreting what you have understood in order to determine how truthful, authentic, or believable you judge the meaning to be. 1. To critically evaluate something, one must be able to separate facts from inferences. a. Facts are statements whose accuracy can be verified or proven. b. Inferences are claims or assertions based on the facts presented. 2. One must also probe for information as a part of critically evaluating a message. a. Probing questions are used to search for more information or try to resolve perceived inconsistencies in a message. b. Nonverbals are especially important when using probing questions to ensure one does not appear arrogant or intimidating. e. Responding is the process of reacting to what has been heard while listening and after listening, and there are some guidelines for responding. 1. Provide back-channel cues which are verbal and nonverbal signals demonstrating listener response to the speaker. 2. Listeners should reply when the message is complete by asking questions, paraphrasing, agreeing, challenging, or giving either advice or support. 3. Respond to the previous message before changing the subject. Digital listening skills 1. Attending and understanding refer to making an extra effort to understand messages you receive through social media. 2. Critically evaluating messages can also improve digital listening skills. 3. We should also recognize underlying motives, values, and ideologies and avoid overdependence. 7: Inter-Act, th 14 Edition Listening 1 Listening: The process of receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and/or nonverbal messages. 2 Listening makes up 42–60% of our communication. Speakin g Reading Writing Listening 3 Challenges to Effective Listening Personal Listening Styles Listening Apprehension Dual Processes 4 Personal Listening Styles • Relational: We focus on what a message tells us about our conversational partners and their feeling. 5 Personal Listening Styles • Analytic: We listen to gather information and tend to think carefully about what we hear. 6 Personal Listening Styles • Transactional: We want speakers to remain on task and get to the point. 7 Personal Listening Styles • Critical: We focus on the accuracy and consistency of the speakers’ messages. 8 Listening Apprehension Anxiety we feel about listening that interferes with our ability to be effective listeners 9 Listening Apprehension Fear of . . . • misinterpreting the message • not being able to understand • how message may psychologically affect us 10 Dual Processes in Listening • Passive listening: effortless, thoughtless, habitual process 11 Dual Processes in Listening • Active listening: skillful, intentional, deliberate, conscious process 12 Active Listening Process Attending Understanding Remembering Critically Evaluating Responding 13 Attending The process of willfully striving to perceive selected sounds that are being heard 14 Improving Attending • Get physically and mentally ready to listen. • Make the shift from speaker to listener a complete one. • Stay tuned in. 15 Understanding Process of accurately decoding a message so you comprehend the semantic, pragmatic, and sociolinguistic meaning 16 Improving Understanding • Identify the speaker’s purpose and key points. • Interpret nonverbal cues. 17 Improving Understanding ➢Ask clarifying questions: a response designed to get further information or to reduce uncertainty from information already received 18 ? Improving Understanding • Ask clarifying questions: ? ➢ Be specific about kind of information you need ? ➢ Deliver in sincere tone of voice ? 19 ? Improving Understanding • Ask clarifying questions: ? ➢ Limit questions or explain that you need to ask multiple ones ? ➢ Put “burden of ignorance” on your own shoulders ? 20 Improving Understanding ➢Paraphrase: an attempt to verify your understanding of a message by putting it into your own words and sharing it with the speaker 21 Improving Understanding ➢Content Paraphrase: conveys your understanding of the denotative meaning of a verbal message 22 Improving Understanding ➢Feelings Paraphrase: conveys your understanding of the emotional meaning behind speaker’s verbal message 23 Improving Understanding ➢Combination Paraphrase: conveys your understanding of both denotative and emotional meaning of speaker’s verbal message 24 Remembering Process of moving information from short-term memory to longterm memory 25 Remembering Reasons we fail to remember • Filtering out messages • Listening anxiously • Listening passively • Remembering selectively • Forgetting the middle of the message 26 Remembering ➢ Primacy Effect: tendency to remember information we heard first ➢ Recency Effect: tendency to remember what we heard last 27 Improving Remembering Using repetition: saying something two, three, or even four times 28 Improving Remembering Create mnemonics: learning technique that associates a special word or short statement with new, longer information Name the Great Lakes. H-O-M-E-S: Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Eerie, Superior 29 Improving Remembering Take notes: providing a written record you can revisit while promoting a more active role in listening process 30 Improving Remembering Take notes when you are listening to complex information. Brief outline: • Overall idea • Main points • Key developmental material 31 Critically Evaluating Determining how truthful, authentic, or believable you judge the message and the speaker to be 32 Improving Critically Evaluating • Separate facts from inferences Facts: accuracy can be verified or proven Inferences: claims or assertions based on the facts 33 Improving Critically Evaluating Facts Ms. Carr was coughing in the hallway. vs. Inferences I bet Ms. Carr’s canceling class today—she’s sick. 34 Improving Critically Evaluating • Probe for information ➢Probing Questions: search for more information or try to resolve inconsistencies How do you know Ms. Carr is canceling? Did she tell you? 35 Responding Process of providing feedback to your partner’s message 36 Improving Responding Provide backchannel cues: verbal and nonverbal signals indicating you are listening and attempting to understand the message 37 Improving Responding Reply when message is complete Respond to previous message before changing subject 38 Digital Listening Skills Digital Communication Literacy: ability to critically attend to, analyze, evaluate, and express digital messages 39 Digital Messages: Attending and Understanding • Technologies affect what we pay attention to and ignore. • We make active selections with technology. • Improve digital and faceto-face interactions: attend to each separately. 40 Digital Messages: Attending and Understanding • Receivers may be distracted—strive for clarity. • Digital media is lean—meaning is difficult without nonverbal cues. • Digital media: not well-suited for complex emotions and difficult issues. 41 Digital Messages: Critically Evaluating • False information is often posted/shared online without much consideration. • Ask questions to separate facts from inferences. • Check inaccurate information before you pass it along. 42 ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running head: QUESTIONS AND PARAPHRASES

Questions and Paraphrases
[Author Name(s), First M. Last, Omit Titles and Degrees]
[Institutional Affiliation(s)]

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QUESTIONS AND PARAPHRASES

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Questions and Paraphrases
What is competent listening?
To understand competent listening, there is a need to first define Listening. Listening is
(the process of comprehending a spoken message or nonverbal message and deducing the
meaning of the said message to give a meaningful response). As for competent listening, it is
(the process of listening with a keen intent to understand not only the speaker's main ideas but
also their emotions and thought process).
How is competent listening different than incompetent listening?
Competent listening involves listening with a literal comprehension of the speaker's
verbal and nonverbal message. On the other hand, incompetent listening one listens without
paying attention to; the speakers' main ideas, supporting information, the relationship between
the ideas, or grasping the most basic of the speaker's ideas. A competent listener will gain useful
information about the speaker, and if a response is required, a well-informed answer will be
guaranteed. An incompetent listener gains little to no details from the speaker.
What are the different listening styles, and what are the benefits and deficiencies of
each one?
There are four different types of listening i.e., content-oriented, action-oriented, timeoriented, and people-oriented (Watson, Barker & Weaver III, 1995). The content-oriented
listener is more inclined to capturing the facts and supporting evidence of the message. Content
oriented listening is limited by the fact that the listener may ignore a lot of the nonverbal cues
that the speaker may be exhibiting. The nonverbal cues give off a lot of information on the ideas
being presented.

QUESTIONS AND PARAPHRASES

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Action-oriented listeners focus on the main ideas and what the speaker is driving to with
the ideas. The deficiency of this style is that the listener may lose focus on listening in the case
where the speaker beats around the bus...

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