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CUR 550 University of Phoenix Implementing a Professional Learning Community PPT

CUR 550

University of Phoenix

CUR

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Assignment Content

  1. Complete slides 7-9 of the Implementing a Professional Learning Community Template.Submit your assignment.

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44 | The Professional Learning Communities at Work™ Continuum: Laying the Foundation We have a clear sense of our collective purpose, the school we are attempting to create to achieve that purpose, the commitments we must make and honor to become that school, and the specific goals that will help monitor our progress. Indicator Shared Mission It is evident that learning for all is our core purpose. Pre-Initiating Initiating Implementing Developing Sustaining The purpose of the school has not been articulated. Most staff members view the mission of the school as teaching. They operate from the assumption that although all students should have the opportunity to learn, responsibility for learning belongs to the individual student and will be determined by his or her ability and effort. An attempt has been made to clarify the purpose of the school through the development of a formal mission statement. Few people were involved in its creation. It does little to impact professional practice or the assumptions behind those practices. A process has been initiated to provide greater focus and clarity regarding the mission of learning for all. Steps are being taken to clarify what, specifically, students are to learn and to monitor their learning. Some teachers are concerned that these efforts will deprive them of academic freedom. Teachers are beginning to see evidence of the benefits of clearly established expectations for student learning and systematic processes to monitor student learning. They are becoming more analytical in assessing the evidence of student learning and are looking for ways to become more effective in assessing student learning and providing instruction to enhance student learning. Staff members are committed to helping all students learn. They demonstrate that commitment by working collaboratively to clarify what students are to learn in each unit, creating frequent common formative assessments to monitor each student’s learning on an ongoing basis, and implementing a systematic plan of intervention when students experience difficulty. They are willing to examine all practices and procedures in light of their impact on learning. Page 1 of 3 R eproducib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. DIRECTIONS: Individually, silently, and honestly assess the current reality of your school’s implementation of each indicator listed in the left column. Consider what evidence or anecdotes support your assessment. This form may also be used to assess district or team implementation. Indicator Shared Vision We have a shared understanding of and commitment to the school we are attempting to create. We have made commitments to each other regarding how we must behave in order to achieve our shared vision. Initiating Implementing Developing Sustaining No effort has been made to engage staff in describing the preferred conditions for the school. A formal vision statement has been created for the school, but most staff members are unaware of it. Staff members have participated in a process to clarify the school they are trying to create, and leadership calls attention to the resulting vision statement on a regular basis. Many staff members question the relevance of the vision statement, and their behavior is generally unaffected by it. Staff members have worked together to describe the school are trying to create. They have endorsed this general description and use it to guide their school improvement efforts and their professional development. Staff members can and do routinely articulate the major principles of the school’s shared vision and use those principles to guide their day-to-day efforts and decisions. They honestly assess the current reality in their school and continually seek more effective strategies for reducing the discrepancy between that reality and they school they are working to create. Staff members have not yet articulated the attitudes, behaviors, or commitments they are prepared to demonstrate in order to advance the mission of learning for all and the vision of what the school might become. Administrators or a committee of teachers have created statements of beliefs regarding the school’s purpose and its direction. Staff members have reviewed and reacted to those statements. Initial drafts have been amended based on staff feedback. There is no attempt to translate the beliefs into the specific commitments or behaviors that staff will model. A statement has been developed that articulates the specific commitments staff have been asked to embrace to help the school fulfill its purpose and move closer to its vision. The commitments are stated as behaviors rather than beliefs. Many staff object to specifying these commitments and prefer to focus on what other groups must do to improve the school. Staff members have been engaged in the process to articulate the collective commitments that will advance the school toward its vision. They endorse the commitments and seek ways to bring them to life in the school. The collective commitments are embraced by staff, embedded in the school’s culture, and evident to observers of the school. They help define the school and what it stands for. Examples of the commitments are shared in stories and celebrations, and people are challenged when they behave in ways that are inconsistent with the collective commitments. Repr od ucib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. Collective Commitments (Shared Values) Pre-Initiating | 45 Page 2 of 3 We have articulated our long-term priorities, short-term targets, and timelines for achieving those targets. Implementing Developing Sustaining No effort has been made to engage the staff in establishing school improvement goals related to student learning. Goals for the school have been established by the administration or school improvement team as part of the formal district process for school improvement. Most staff would be unable to articulate a goal that has been established for their school. Staff members have been made aware of the long-term and short-term goals for the school. Tools and strategies have been developed and implemented to monitor the school’s progress toward its goals. Little has been done to translate the school goal into meaningful targets for either collaborative teams or individual teachers. The school goal has been translated into specific goals that directly impact student achievement for each collaborative team. If teams are successful in achieving their goals, the school will achieve its goal as well. Teams are exploring different strategies for achieving their goals. All staff members pursue measurable goals that are directly linked to the school’s goals as part of their routine responsibilities. Teams work interdependently to achieve common goals for which members are mutually accountable. The celebration of the achievement of goals is part of the school culture and an important element in sustaining the PLC process. Page 3 of 3 R eproducib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. Initiating | Common School Goals Pre-Initiating 46 Indicator Where Do We Go From Here? Worksheet Monitoring Each Student’s Learning Who will be responsible for initiating or sustaining these steps or activities? What is a realistic timeline for each step or phase of the activity? What will you use to assess the effectiveness of your initiative? We work with colleagues on our team to clarify the criteria by which we will judge the quality of student work, and we practice applying those criteria until we can do so consistently. We monitor the learning of each student’s attainment of all essential outcomes on a timely basis through a series of frequent, team-developed common formative assessments that are aligned with high-stakes assessments students will be required to take. Repr od ucib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. Indicator of a PLC at Work What steps or activities must be initiated to create this condition in your school? | 85 84 We work with colleagues on our team to build shared knowledge regarding state, provincial, and/or national standards; district curriculum guides; trends in student achievement; and expectations for the next course or grade level. This collective inquiry has enabled each member of our team to clarify what all students must know and be able to do as a result of every unit of instruction. Who will be responsible for initiating or sustaining these steps or activities? What is a realistic timeline for each step or phase of the activity? What will you use to assess the effectiveness of your initiative? R eproducib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. Indicator of a PLC at Work What steps or activities must be initiated to create this condition in your school? | Where Do We Go From Here? Worksheet Clearly Defined Outcomes 82 | The Professional Learning Communities at Work™ Continuum: Learning as Our Fundamental Purpose (Part I) We acknowledge that the fundamental purpose of our school is to help all students achieve high levels of learning, and therefore, we work collaboratively to clarify what students must learn and how we will monitor each student’s learning. Indicator Pre-Initiating Initiating Implementing Developing Sustaining We work with colleagues on our team to build shared knowledge regarding state, provincial, and/ or national standards; district curriculum guides; trends in student achievement; and expectations for the next course or grade level. This collective inquiry has enabled each member of our team to clarify what all students must know and be able to do as a result of every unit of instruction. Teachers have been provided with a copy of state, provincial, and/or national standards and a district curriculum guide. There is no process for them to discuss curriculum with colleagues and no expectation they will do so. Teacher representatives have helped to create a district curriculum guide. Those involved in the development feel it is a useful resource for teachers. Those not involved in the development may or may not use the guide. Teachers are working in collaborative teams to clarify the essential learning for each unit and to establish a common pacing guide. Some staff members question the benefit of the work. They argue that developing curriculum is the responsibility of the central office or textbook publishers rather than teachers. Some are reluctant to give up favorite units that seem to have no bearing on essential standards. Teachers have clarified the essential learning for each unit by building shared knowledge regarding state, provincial, and/or national standards; by studying highstakes assessments; and by seeking input regarding the prerequisites for success as students enter the next grade level. They are beginning to adjust curriculum, pacing, and instruction based on evidence of student learning. Teachers on every collaborative team are confident they have established a guaranteed and viable curriculum for their students. Their clarity regarding the knowledge and skills students must acquire as a result of each unit of instruction, and their commitment to providing students with the instruction and support to achieve the intended outcomes, give every student access to essential learning. Page 1 of 2 R eproducib lE Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. DIRECTIONS: Individually, silently, and honestly assess the current reality of your school’s implementation of each indicator listed in the left column. Consider what evidence or anecdotes support your assessment. This form may also be used to assess district or team implementation. Learning by Doing © 2006, 2010 Solution Tree Press • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/PLCbooks to download this page. | Page 2 of 2 Collaborative teams of teachers gather evidence of student learning on a regular basis through frequent common formative assessments. The team analysis of results drives the continuous improvement process of the school. Members determine the effectiveness of instructional strategies based on evidence of student learning rather than teacher preference or precedent. Members who struggle to teach a skill are learning from those who are getting the best results. The frequent common formative assessments provide the vital information that fuels the school’s system of intervention and enrichment. The assessments are formative because (1) they are used to identify students who need additional time and support for learning, (2) the students receive the additional time and support for learning, and (3) students are given another opportunity to demonstrate that they have learned. Teachers working in collaborative teams have created a series of common assessments and agreed on the specific standard students must achieve to be deemed proficient. The user-friendly results of common assessments are providing each member of the team with timely evidence of student learning. Members are using that evidence to improve their assessments and to develop more effective instructional strategies. Teachers working in collaborative teams have begun to create common assessments. Some attempt to circumvent the collaborative process by proposing the team merely use the quizzes and tests that are available in the textbook as their common assessments. Some administrators question the ability of teachers to create good assessments and argue that the district should purchase commercially developed tests. Each teacher creates his or her own assessments to monitor student learning. Assessments are typically summative rather than formative. A teacher can teach an entire career and not know if he or she teaches a particular skill or concept better or worse than the colleague in the next room. The district has established benchmark assessments that are administered several times throughout the year. Teachers pay little attention to the results and would have a difficult time explaining the purpose of the benchmark assessments. We monitor the learning of each student’s attainment of all essential outcomes on a timely basis through a series of frequent, team-developed common formative assessments that are aligned with highstakes assessments students will be required to take. Collaborative teams of teachers frequently use performance-based assessments to gather evidence of student learning. Members have established strong inter-rater reliability and use the results from these assessments to inform and improve their individual and collective practice. The team’s clarity also helps members teach the criteria to students, who can then assess the quality of their own work and become more actively engaged in their learning. Teachers working in collaborative teams are clear on the criteria they will use in assessing the quality of student work and can apply the criteria consistently. Teachers working in collaborative teams are attempting to assess student work according to common criteria. They are practicing applying the criteria to examples of student work, but they are not yet consistent. The discrepancy is causing some tension on the team. Teachers have been provided with sample rubrics for assessing the quality of student work. Each teacher establishes his or her own criteria for assessing the quality of student work. We work with colleagues on our team to clarify the criteria by which we will judge the quality of student work, and we practice applying those criteria until we can do so consistently. Sustaining Developing Implementing Initiating Pre-Initiating Indicator Repr od ucib lE 83 Implementing a Professional Learning Community Template Kevin D Pierce CUR/550: Engaging In Communities Of Practice Diane Levy Instructions Please read before proceeding with this section!! • Download and/or print the required worksheets for each week based on the assigned weekly chapter readings found at http://www.solution-tree.com/free-resources/plcatwork/lbd2 • Give the rating scale to your school’s leadership team (administration, coaches, department chairs, team or grade level leaders) and yourself. • If you are not currently in a P-12 setting, give the rating scale to one upper management or administrator and 3 various leadership or middle management members in different levels or departments and use their results. • For each indicator, have participants determine on the rating scale survey the appropriate stage of your setting: pre-initiating to sustaining by circling the indicators for each descriptor and category. • Record your findings on the following slides each week. Week 2 The following slides are due in week 2. Laying the Foundation of a PLC Average rating for each of the 4 indicators at your school/setting: (please list each indicator in a few words and the average score for your school or setting) Example: (some indicators in future weeks are a paragraph length so you will need to shorten each to a few words) 1) Shared Mission: Average= Implementing Rationale of why your school/setting received the score: A process has been initiated to provide greater focus and clarity regarding the mission of learning for all. Steps are being taken to clarify what, specifically, students are to learn and to monitor their learning. Some teachers are concerned that these efforts will deprive them of academic freedom. Laying the Foundation of a PLC Summarizetothe next steps to be taken at your schoolto/ be setting Steps/Activities be initiated in your Reframing the purpose all school based on the indicators followinginclusive the rating scales in your text. Regularly checking and evaluating content, curriculum, marketing, and student expectations with common values, and school mission. Who is responsible for initiating / sustaining those activities The school staff will be responsible for initiating and sustaining the activities Realistic Timeline for your events 5 months Method of Evaluation for effectiveness formulation of formative assessments as well as summative assessments to check the progress. Effective Communication Average rating for each of the 2 indicators at your school/setting: (please list each indicator in a few words and the average score for your school or setting Effective Communication= Average Rationale of why your school/setting received the score: There is general understanding of the purpose and priorities of the school, but many staff members have not embraced them. Specific steps are being taken to advance the priorities, but some staff members are participating only grudgingly. They view the initiative as interfering with their real work. Effective Communication Summarize the next steps to be taken at your school / setting based on the indicators following the rating scales in your text. Steps/Activities to be initiated in your school Creation of a culture in that school that will encourage listening, engaging, asking, reflection and nurturing of communication Who is responsible for initiating / sustaining those activities The staff and the students will work together to ensure the strategy kicks off Realistic Timeline for your events 2 months Method of Evaluation for effectiveness Invitation of conversation and sharing of information tha ...
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Hello, kindly find the attached completed work. Thank You

Implementing a Professional
Learning Community
Name

Instructions

Please read before
proceeding with this
section!!

• Download and/or print the required worksheets for each week
based on the assigned weekly chapter readings found at
http://www.solution-tree.com/free-resources/plcatwork/lbd2
• Give the rating scale to your school’s leadership team
(administration, coaches, department chairs, team or grade level
leaders) and yourself.
• If you are not currently in a P-12 setting, give the rating scale to one
upper management or administrator and 3 various leadership or
middle management members in different levels or departments
and use their results.
• For each indicator, have participants determine on the rating scale
survey the appropriate stage of your setting: pre-initiating to
sustaining by circling the indicators for each descriptor and category.
• Record your findings on the following slides each week.

Week
2

The following slides are
due in week 2.

Laying the Foundation of a PLC
Average rating for each of the 4 indicators at your school/setting:

(please

list each indicator in a few words and the average score for your school or setting)

Example: (some indicators in future weeks are a paragraph length so you will need to
shorten each to a few words)

1) Shared Mission: Average= Implementing

Rationale of why your school/setting received the score:
A process has been initiated to provide greater focus and clarity
regarding the mission of learning for all. Steps are being taken to
clarify what, specifically, st...

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