Humanities
GEOG 120 Binghamton Surface Weather Maps Isoplething and Interpretation Project

GEOG 120

Binghamton University

GEOG

Question Description

Help me study for my Geography class. I’m stuck and don’t understand.

follow instruction finishing the three page lab and give it back to me with in 24 hours

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Surface Weather Maps: Isoplething and Interpretation Introduction We have all seen the classic surface weather map with red L’s and blue H’s representing low and high pressure respectively with fronts plotted to show location and direction of movement. These surface weather maps provide the reader with a quick, easy way to interpret regional or national weather. Isoplething is the process of creating lines of equal value, like contouring on topographic maps, see Chapter 1 Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere for a review of contouring. On surface weather maps, we create isobars, lines of equal pressure. Isobars allow us to determine locations of high and low pressure. The standard convention is to plot isobars every 1000 mb, for instance, lines would be plotted at 996 mb, 1000 mb, 1004 mb, 1008 mb and so on up or down depending on the daily values. This laboratory assignment will have you access surface weather plots in real time and conduct the analysis. Mesoscale meteorologists at the Storm Prediction Center still use hand analysis techniques for storm forecasting. Know Before You Go Prior to completing the laboratory activity, you should review Chapter 6 and 8 Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere and answer the following questions. a. What is a trough? How is it delineated on a weather map? b. What is a ridge? How is it delineated on a weather map? c. What are the vertical and surface characteristics of a high pressure system? d. What are the vertical and surface characteristics of a low pressure system? e. What conditions are expected ahead of and behind a cold front? f. What conditions are expected ahead of and behind a warm front? Get the Data 1. Go to the Storm Prediction Center Surface Map page at http://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/surfaceMaps/. 2. Below the United States map, select “Contiguous United States” (unless there is an interesting current regional weather pattern and you are directed to focus on a specific region). 3. Print out the map. 4. Using a 0.5 mm mechanical pencil, analyze the map by creating isobars every 4 mb. (Remember pressure is plotted in code, see Chapter 6 in Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere for a refresher on how to go between coded pressure and actual pressure. Be sure to label the isobars in a clear and easy to read way as you would typically find on a surface weather map. 5. Label any high pressure systems with a blue H. 6. Label any low pressure systems with a red L. 7. Identify and label any major fronts. Be sure to use standard convention for color and shape. 8. Label any ridges or troughs present. Apply Your Knowledge 1. Based on the surface weather map, what weather do you expect in your region today? 2. Based on the surface weather map, how might your weather be changing over the next 24 hours? 3. What did you find challenging about isoplething? 4. What did you learn by doing this analysis by hand? ...
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Final Answer

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Surface Weather Maps: Isoplething and Interpretation
Introduction
We have all seen the classic surface weather map with red L’s and blue H’s representing
low and high pressure respectively with fronts plotted to show location and direction of
movement. These surface weather maps provide the reader with a quick, easy way to interpret
regional or national weather. Isoplething is the process of creating lines of equal value, like
contouring on topographic maps, see Chapter 1 Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the
Atmosphere for a review of contouring. On surface weather maps, we create isobars, lines of
equal pressure. Isobars allow us to determine locations of high and low pressure. The standard
convention is to plot isobars every 4mb, for instance, lines would be plotted at 996 mb, 1000 mb,
1004 mb, 1008 mb and so on up or down depending on the daily values. This laboratory
assignment will have you access surface weather plots in real time and conduct the analysis....

New York University

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