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Lindenwood University Belleville Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet

Lindenwood University Belleville

Question Description

I need help with a Art question. All explanations and answers will be used to help me learn.

The essay requirement is a minimum of 600 words in addition to the basic information sentences required on the first two pages of your selected Aesthetic Experience worksheet.

The following link will provide a list of the online museums for this assignment.

For a Museum experience:

Please use this link to choose from the 9 art museums on this site (https://www.top10.com/virtual-museum-tours). Please do not use the Smithsonian as it is just the Natural History museum and will not work for this assignment.

here is the link again if it doesn't work.

https://www.top10.com/virtual-museum-tours

****Feel free to pick any of the museums except for the Smithsonian ****

I am also attaching the Museum Visit Aesthetic experience worksheet please fill it out starting at *Art Work Information**


Unformatted Attachment Preview

Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The student will be able to identify elements of style in various forms of western and non-western human creative expression. The student will be able to apply a basic vocabulary essential for communicating concepts in the humanities disciplines. The student will be able to identify how forms of Western and Non-Western human creative expressions reflect the human condition. The student will be able to compare and contrast enduring contributions of individual artists, thinkers, and writers. The student will be able to develop critical analysis skills in reference to works of human creative expression. GRADING See the assessment rubric attached to the Aesthetic Experience and Critical Analysis Essay dropbox folder. MATERIALS Use all of the online module resources, your textbook, and the Visual Art Vocabulary and Principles at the end of this document to guide your writing. INSTRUCTIONS For this assignment you will physically attend an art museum and select a piece of art to write about. Then you will compare it to an artwork from our textbook and complete this worksheet. 1. Choose an art museum near your location to visit that meets the following criteria: • The museum you attend must be an art museum, not a science museum or a children's museum. • The museum must provide a dated receipt or dated ticket. You must take a digital photograph of your dated receipt or dated ticket and insert it in the designated space provided below. • If you experience difficulty finding an art museum near your location, contact your instructor. 2. Visit your chosen art museum, and select a work of art. Suggestions: • The work can be a painting, sculpture, photograph, mixed media, or any other medium exhibited in the museum. • You may wish to take a copy of this worksheet with you to the museum in order to more carefully select a work of art. 3. Complete the “Essay Header” section in the designated space provided below. 4. Complete the “Art Work Information” section in the designated space provided below. 5. Complete the 3 Prompts in the “Aesthetic Experience and Critical Analysis Essay” section in the designated space provided below. Respond to the prompts using the following guidelines: • Use full sentences and paragraphs in your responses. • Use and incorporate relevant and genre-specific vocabulary for each prompt. Definitions of relevant vocabulary are provided at the end of this document, in the online module resources, and in your textbook. • Your completed essay responses should be a total of at least 600 words (at least 200 words per response). 6. Submit your completed Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet to the Aesthetic Experience and Critical Analysis Essay dropbox folder. ESSAY HEADER Student Full Name Name of Museum Location of Museum Date of Museum Visit 1 Digital Photograph of Dated Receipt or Dated Ticket 2 ART WORK INFORMATION Title Artist Creation Date Discipline Classification How is the selection classified in the Humanities? Is it Literature, Visual Art, Music, Theater, Musical Stage, or other? Genre, Time Period, Style What type of art is it? Is it a painting, sculpture, photograph, mixed media, or other? Is it classical, impressionism, abstract, cubism, modernism, etc.? Medium What is this work constructed from? What type of materials are used? Size & Effect of Size What is the size of the work? Do you believe that the size has any impact upon the way that you react to this piece? How? Social, Historical, Cultural Origin Western or Non-western Humanities Classification Based on the social, historical, and cultural contexts: Would you classify this work as Western or Non-Western? Based on your research and observations, provide reasons and evidence supporting your classification claim. 3 AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE AND CRITICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY Prompt 1 Using the space provided below, analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least 200 words using the following guidelines: • Identify the most significant art principles that were used in the work of art, using at least three relevant and genre-specific vocabulary words, clearly describing how the artist used them. Provide a minimum of three specific, descriptive details to support the use of each selected art principle. • Select two adjectives describing the overall mood of the piece (stay away from vague terms such as amazing, awesome, excellent, etc.). Give a minimum of two specific/descriptive details to support your claims. 4 Prompt 2 Using the space provided below, further analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least 200 words using the following guidelines: • Describe the main social, historical, and cultural contexts of the work? Refer to your responses in the “Art Work Information” section above. • Describe the primary purpose of the art work. • Describe the main artistic statement. • Describe how the work reflects the human condition, or how it communicates as a “human, creative expression.” 5 Prompt 3 Using the space provided below, compare the work of art with another work of art from your textbook in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least 200 words using the following guidelines: • Select and identify another work of art from your textbook that is similar to the work of art that you selected from the museum. In most cases, the works of art in your textbook are considered masterpieces. • Explain three qualities that the work from the museum shares with the work from the textbook, with specific examples to support your argument. • Based on your comparison, explain whether or not the work of art from the museum is a masterpiece or might become a masterpiece, using specific examples to support your decision. 6 Visual Art Vocabulary and Principles TERM Abstract DEFINITION To simplify, rearrange or distort an image; a non- representational (non-realist) form of art. Abstract Art Art that takes from reality only what the artist wants or that renders a visual depiction of concepts in the artist’s mind (phenomenal). Such art typically does not resemble the familiar world of regular (veridical) perception. Adjective Words used to describe or modify nouns or pronouns. For example, red, quick, happy, and obnoxious are adjectives because they can describe things—a red hat, the quick rabbit, a happy duck, an obnoxious person. Aesthetics The study of the nature of beauty and art (including the study of human “response” to the “aesthetic experience”). It is a significant branch of philosophy. The word “Aesthetics” is derived from the Greek word meaning “sense perception”. Aesthetic Experience Having an experience in the arts (broadly) such as viewing art, stage productions (like theater, dance, etc.), or viewing and listening to music (like concerts, opera, singing, etc.), or reading literature and philosophy, that we value intrinsically. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 1, page 15 Background The part of a pictorial representation that appears to be in the distance. The general scene or surface against which designs, patterns or figures are viewed. Balance A principle of art that is concerned with the sense of stability of the visual elements. There are three types of balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial. Catharsis A healthy release of pent up emotion. This can occur as a result of an aesthetic experience. Chiaroscuro Italian term in painting utilizing light and dark contrast to create the effect of modeling a figure or object. It enhances the effect of depth. Classicism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Collage See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Content The message or subject the work communicates. The content can relate to the subject matter or be an idea or emotion. Theme is another word used for content in humanities. Context In humanities, the environment, background, or special circumstances in terms of which a given work is best understood. Social, historical, and cultural context is the identification of political/social arrangements, philosophical ideas, values, styles, and cultural identity of a particular time period in which a selected work is influenced by or may be attempting to express. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Contrast A principle of art that uses the differences between the visual elements to create variety, emphasis or interest. Contrast in value is the difference between light and dark. Cool Colors Colors such as purples, blues and greens that produce the impression of coolness. Cubism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Discipline (1) in the humanities, a given art form (such as literature, visual art, music, theater, musical stage, and others) that attempts to create and express the human condition; (2) in academia, a given department or area of study (like science, history, philosophy, and others). Eastern Humanities Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of one of (broadly) Asia, Africa, Middle East, Indigenous Peoples of all continents (except Europe), and Oceania. Narrowly: China, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Pacific Islands, Native America, Aborigines, and Mesoamerica. See also Non-Western Humanities. Focal area A principle of art that stresses one element of art; defines a center of interest or draws attention to certain areas with a work of art. Foreground The part of a scene or picture that is nearest to and in front of the viewer. Form The visual element that is three-dimensional; having height, width and depth. Fresco See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Genre (broadly in the humanities) a distinct category within a discipline (e.g. categories in film, literature, art, music, musical stage, etc.). EXAMPLE: Poetry is a genre of Literature. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 4, page 99 Genre subject In art, a scene or a person from everyday life, depicted realistically and without religious or symbolic significance. 7 TERM Golden Section DEFINITION See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Gothic See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Human Condition Encompasses the uniqueness and totality of the inner experience of “being human”. It is often focused on the ultimate concerns of human existence. Various disciplines in the humanities attempt to express this experience. Imitation See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Impressionism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Intensity The degree of purity of a color. Deep colors have a high intensity. Installation art An art that creates an architectural tableau using objects drawn from and making reference to artistic sources and everyday life. Likeness the reproduction in several humanities disciplines that is a conscious attempt to imitate reality in its expression. See “Realism” and key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Line A visual element that is the path of moving points through space; it has the properties of direction, width and length. Masterpiece A work that in style, form, and execution far exceeds other works of its time. It is a human creation (e.g. painting, novel, film, musical score) that continues to be relevant and/or admired by multiple generations. It is a work that has a profound effect on humanity. Media or Medium the particular materials in which a given artist works. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Modernism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Movement A principle of art used to guide a viewer’s eye throughout the work; a trend. Negative space Spaces surrounding shapes or forms in two- and three-dimensional art. Non-Western Humanities Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of one of (broadly) Asia, Africa, Middle East, Indigenous Peoples of all continents (except Europe), and Oceania. Narrowly: China, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Pacific Islands, Native America, Aborigines, and Mesoamerica. See also Eastern Humanities. Pattern Repetition of elements or motif. Perspective A formula for projecting the illusion of three- dimensional space onto a two-dimensional surface. Phenomenological Perception A perception that exists in your mind as a result of (1) mind internally produced, mind internal causation (like hearing your favorite song while no music is playing), or (2) the mental image (in your mind) that is produced as a result of a veridical perception as it is happening (like seeing color while viewing a painting). Pop Art See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Positive space Shapes or forms in two-dimensional and three- dimensional art. Post Impressionism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Post Modernism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Proportion A principle of art concerned with the relationships in size, one part to another or to the whole. Psychological Realism Artist’s attempt to convey the inner life of the figure, subject, or protagonist. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Realism (1) A style that focuses on the everyday lives of the middle and lower classes, portraying their world in a serious, accurate, and unsentimental way; (2) a genre in several humanities disciplines that is a conscious attempt to imitate reality in its expression (see “Likeness” also). Renaissance See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Repetition An art element repeated over and over that can produce visual rhythm. Saturation The strength of a hue - a vivid hue is of high saturation. Scale When proportional relationships are created relative to a specific unit of measurement. 8 TERM Shape DEFINITION The visual element that has two-dimensions: height and width; a space with a defined or implied boundary. Two basic groups: geometric and organic. Super-Realism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Surrealism See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150 Symbol A visual image that represents something other than itself. Symmetry The balance of like forms and colors on opposite sides of the vertical axis of a composition. Theme The message or subject the work communicates. The theme can relate to the subject matter or be an idea or emotion. Content is another word used for theme in humanities. Texture The visual element that refers to the way something feels or looks like it feels and can be actual or implied. Unity A principle of art that is concerned with the sense of wholeness or completeness. Vanishing point in linear perspective – the point on the horizon at which the receding parallel lines appear to converge and then vanish. Veridical Perception A perception caused by something outside of your mind (e.g. light waves striking your eyes causing an image in your brain). This is a perception caused by a sensory experience (like viewing a painting). Warm colors Colors such as reds, oranges, yellows and browns that produce the impression of warmth. Western Humanities Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of European civilization or by civilizations heavily influenced by European immigration and colonization. In most cases these Western cultures trace significant belief systems and history to Ancient Greece. Broadly: Europe, and Non-Indigenous United States, Canada, and Australia. 9 ...
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Final Answer

Hey there. Attached is the completed worksheet assignment. Just want to let you know that when the worksheet is run through the plagiarism checker it shows an abnormally high rate of plagiarism at 42%. The reason for this it that the blank worksheet, and therefore all of its content word for word is widely distributed across the internet on websites like CourseHero for example because it is used across different institutions and instructors because it is part of a textbook.I therefore extracted all of my answers and writing from the worksheet onto a separate word document and ran it through the scanner. This yielded a result of 7% showing that the work meets the standards of being under 15%. I just wanted to clarify this in case you had any concerns. For your convenience I am attaching the work within the worksheet as I am assuming this is how it will need to be turned in to the instructor for grading, but if you would like I can also provide the answers only on a separate word document. Let me know if you need this.

Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The student will be able to identify elements of style in various forms of western and non-western human creative expression.
The student will be able to apply a basic vocabulary essential for communicating concepts in the humanities disciplines.
The student will be able to identify how forms of Western and Non-Western human creative expressions reflect the human condition.
The student will be able to compare and contrast enduring contributions of individual artists, thinkers, and writers.
The student will be able to develop critical analysis skills in reference to works of human creative expression.

GRADING
See the assessment rubric attached to the Aesthetic Experience and Critical Analysis Essay dropbox folder.

MATERIALS
Use all of the online module resources, your textbook, and the Visual Art Vocabulary and Principles at the end of this document to
guide your writing.

INSTRUCTIONS
For this assignment you will physically attend an art museum and select a piece of art to write about. Then you will
compare it to an artwork from our textbook and complete this worksheet.
1. Choose an art museum near your location to visit that meets the following criteria:
• The museum you attend must be an art museum, not a science museum or a children's museum.
• The museum must provide a dated receipt or dated ticket. You must take a digital photograph of your dated
receipt or dated ticket and insert it in the designated space provided below.
• If you experience difficulty finding an art museum near your location, contact your instructor.
2. Visit your chosen art museum, and select a work of art. Suggestions:
• The work can be a painting, sculpture, photograph, mixed media, or any other medium exhibited in the
museum.
• You may wish to take a copy of this worksheet with you to the museum in order to more carefully select a
work of art.
3. Complete the "Essay Header" section in the designated space provided below.
4. Complete the "Art Work Information" section in the designated space provided below.
5. Complete the 3 Prompts in the "Aesthetic Experience and Critical Analysis Essay" section in the
designated space provided below. Respond to the prompts using the following guidelines:
• Use full sentences and paragraphs in your responses.
• Use and incorporate relevant and genre-specific vocabulary for each prompt. Definitions of relevant
vocabulary are provided at the end of this document, in the online module resources, and in your textbook.
• Your completed essay responses should be a total of at least 600 words (at least 200 words per response).
6. Submit your completed Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet to the Aesthetic Experience and
Critical Analysis Essay dropbox folder.

ESSAY HEADER
Student Full Name
Name of Museum

The Museum of Modern Art

Location of Museum

New York City

Date of Museum Visit

March 31, 2020

1

Digital
Photograph of
Dated Receipt
or Dated Ticket

The museum was virtually visited through this website: https://artsandculture.google.com/partner/moma-themuseum-of-modern-art

2

ART WORK INFORMATION
Title
Artist
Creation Date
Discipline Classification

"Hope, II"
Gustav Klimt
1907 - 1908
The art work chosen is classified as Visual Art.

How is the selection classified in
the Humanities? Is it Literature,
Visual Art, Music, Theater, Musical
Stage, or other?

Genre, Time Period, Style
What type of art is it? Is it a
painting, sculpture, photograph,
mixed media, or other? Is it
classical, impressionism, abstract,
cubism, modernism, etc.?

Medium

It is a painting created by Gustav Klimt, who also created art nouveau works. Mostly
Naturalism, Symbolism, and Realism are the styles that were depicted in his works,
specifically in "Hope, II."

The painting was made from oil, gold, and platinum on canvas.

What is this work constructed
from? What type of materials are
used?

Size & Effect of Size
What is the size of the work? Do
you believe that the size has any
impact upon the way that you react
to this piece? How?

The physical dimensions of the painting were w1105 x h1105 mm (or 110.5 by 110.5 cm).
Personally, the size wasn't the predominant factor in why I chose the painting – it was its
vividness. However, I believe that some artworks do command attention when constructed on
a bigger size.

Social, Historical, Cultural
Origin

The roots of Klimt's art nouveau works came from the group of the Vienna Secession, a group
created by himself. The group was focused on highlighting works with unusual styles created
by young artists. A distinguished work of this genre was the painting "Hope," which inspired a
de facto duplicate of a masterpiece entitled "Hope, II." The two works were both created by
Klimt, and although comparably, they are slightly varying in format, they both exhibit a
symbolism that reflected the existence of life and death. Moreover, the painting exhibits the
social relevance of a woman bearing a child, its core significance, which is to give life to a
human being and become a part of society.

Western or Non-western
Humanities Classification

The painting Hope II is classified as Western, considering its social, historical, and cultural
origin. The painting realistically depicts the human body or the individuality of a person, an
essential aspect in Western art. Moreover, there are several aspects in the painting that
conform to Western art standards, including; the vivid use of color, the use of canvas as a
medium, and there is an inclusion of European culture as well as utilization of European
aesthetics.

Based on the social, historical, and
cultural contexts: Would you
classify this work as Western or
Non-Western? Based on your
research
and
observations,
provide reasons and evidence
supporting
your
classification
claim.

3

AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE AND CRITICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY
Prompt 1
Using the space provided below, analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least 200 words
using the following guidelines:
• Identify the most significant art principles that were used in the work of art, using at least three relevant and
genre-specific vocabulary words, clearly describing how the artist used them. Provide a minimum of three
specific, descriptive details to support the use of each selected art principle.
• Select two adjectives describing the overall mood of the piece (stay away from vague terms such as amazing,
awesome, excellent, etc.). Give a minimum of two specific/descriptive details to support your claims.
The artwork "Hope, II" primarily depicts the artistic principles of Emphasis, Variety, and Repetition. It emphasizes the blanket,
which serves as "hope" per se, through the use of colors in high intensity as well as high saturation with the blanket serving as the
focal area or the accentuated feature of the artwork as a whole. The painting also flaunts variety through the chaotic energy it
portrays, as evident on the symbols scattered having no proportion to each other that it almost borders on the abstract, invoking the
sense of a powerful emotion from the viewer. The last principle to note is repetition, which is practically the pattern itself, as
evident in the combination of shapes, colors, lines, and other elements recurring in different sizes across the whole painting,
suggesting feelings of security and calmness.
The painting gave me the feeling of being overwhelmed and somber as an overall mood. It was overwhelming because it transcends
the idea of life and death so visceral, two vital concepts on our own individuality and being. The concept of life and death lies in
the condition of the pregnant woman. Her overall disposition is inclined to her offspring and contingent on its outcome.
Additionally, it was somber in a way that it evokes the sense of perturbation that the mother possesses. In the painting, the image of
the pregnant woman reflects a somber demeanor, and the faces on the hem can be interpreted as her inner anxiety and worries.

4

Prompt 2
Using the space provided below, further analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least
200 words using the following guidelines:
• Describe the main social, historical, and cultural contexts of the work? Refer to your responses in the "Art Work
Information" section above.
• Describe the primary purpose of the art work.
• Describe the main artistic statement.
• Describe how the work reflects the human condition, or how it communicates as a "human, creative expression."
Gustav Klimt founded the group Vienna Secession to provide exhibitions to unconventional young artists. The goal of the group
did not encourage any particular style. Thus Naturalism, Realism, and Symbolism coexisted; in this contexture was where Klimt's
artworks thrive. Hence, historically, the painting "Hope, II" was inspired under the influence of his group's ideas regarding the arts.
The painting also shows a depiction of a family; even though an image of a father is absent, it still a basal interpretation of a family
unit – which is a substantial cultural prompt in Western arts. Furthermore, the painting shows its social relevance through the
portrayal of procreation and its connection to existing social relationships; the three women at the hem of the "hope" blanket can
also be imagined as existing relationships showing support for the pregnant woman's gravidity.
In my opinion, the primary purpose of the painting was to portray the thin line separating life and death. The concept of life and
death in the picture are shown simultaneously in a visceral way, and from the distinction of one from the other, lies hope. I perceive
hope as the artistic statement, not only because it is entitled as such but also because of the way the pregnant woman bows her head
down, seemingly in a manner of prayer – which we know is the greatest symbol of hope. I believe that the painting captures the
essence of bearing a child, reflecting the conditions of a pregnant woman. The painting rouses consciousness upon the viewer about
the dynamic sensibilities of being pregnant. The palette of colors is vivid, yet there is sadness in the women's faces, and the
appearance of a skull on the stomach signifies a question whether the baby will be born or not; the suggestion of death was
deliberate, so that the viewer can feel the reality that life could be cruel.

5

Prompt 3
Using the space provided below, compare the work of art with another work of art from your textbook in at least two fully
developed paragraphs with at least 200 words using the following guidelines:
• Select and identify another work of art from your textbook that is similar to the work of art that you selected from
the museum. In most cases, the works of art in your textbook are considered masterpieces.
• Explain three qualities that the work from the museum shares with the work from the textbook, with specific
examples to support your argument.
• Based on your comparison, explain whether or not the work of art from the museum is a masterpiece or might
become a masterpiece, using specific examples to support your decision.
I noticed there is one particular painting in The MoMa that is quite similar to "Hope, II," and that is Pablo Picasso's "Les
Demoiselles d'Avignon." First of all, they are similar in featuring women as the central figure of the whole painting; the pregnant
woman and the three women at the hem of the blanket in "Hope, II" and the five women in different poses in "Les Demoiselles
d'Avignon." Secondly, they are similar in the way of using warm color palettes in high intensity that stands out upon observation.
In "Hope, II," the most prominent colors are orange, yellow, and neutrals, while in "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon," red, flesh, and
orange are the most distinguishable colors. Thirdly, they both exhibit Symbolism as a primary painting technique, which does not
stick to real or perfect proportions, but still not deviating from the correct forms of painting. An example of this is the pattern in
"Hope, II" on how the three women were connected, and the pattern itself evokes a sense of chaos that can be interpreted as not
proportional. On the other hand, in "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon," the women were immediately noticeable to have disproportional
features and figures with a background with lines in different directions, evoking the same sense of chaos as the former.
Technically, both of these paintings are already known to be masterpieces. Pablo Picasso's work has been highly valued, in many
ways, by art enthusiasts, and it is common knowledge of how great a painter he is. On the other hand, Gustav Klimt had been a
seasoned artist himself and had even revolutionized art nouveau. To compare Klimt's work to Picasso's, in terms of its mastery, is
already a statement that goes without saying. In the case of Picasso, he pioneered cubism, invented collage, and made significant
contributions to Symbolism and Surrealism. In Klimt's case, he was a master of Symbolism; he embedded allusions to sexuality
and the human psyche in the rich, lavishl...

JGomezMPA (1113)
New York University

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