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Higher College of Technology Communications and Emotional Intelligence for HRM PPT

Higher College of Technology

Question Description

Need help with my Powerpoint question - I’m studying for my class.

  • Individually Choose a Short Case that portrays a problem (this may be a short case that is created by students or a researched case that already has been written) related to either Team building orstrategic communicationorthe development of others
  • Analyze the Case and describe the problem from an EI point of view (summarize the case)
  • Apply the any of these self-management tools to the case: Self-awareness, self-control, self-confidence, self-control, empathy and non-verbal communication to the case (all of these should be applied, if the case didn’t talk about one of them or … you have to apply it from your point of view (your own analysis) .
  • Apply your knowledge of either Team building or Strategic communication or Developing others to the case.
  • Give recommendations on how EI can supportthe goals of the company in your case study

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HRM 4033 Managing Communications and Emotional Intelligence for HRM Assessment 3 (25%) CLO3 Apply Emotional Intelligence tools to increase self-awareness and self-management of personal emotions. CLO4 Analyze the role of Emotional Intelligence in supporting an organization’s goals. Individual Students will choose a topic from LOs 3-4 (in consultation with the lecturer) to present in class in the form of a Power Point Presentation. Assessment Guideline: 1. Individually Choose a Short Case that portrays a problem (this may be a short case that is created by students or a researched case that already has been written) related to either Team building or strategic communication or the development of others 2. Analyze the Case and describe the problem from an EI point of view (summarize the case) 3. Apply the any of these self-management tools to the case: Self-awareness, self-control, self-confidence, self-control, empathy and non-verbal communication to the case (all of these should be applied, if the case didn’t talk about one of them or … you have to apply it from your point of view (your own analysis) . 4. Apply your knowledge of either Team building or Strategic communication or Developing others to the case. 5. Give recommendations on how EI can support the goals of the company in your case study Each student have 20 – 30 minutes Unacceptable F (0-59) Assessment Criteria for power point presentation Achievement that does not meet requirements for course with normal grading mode. Minimum requirements D (60-64) Satisfactory Achievement that minimally meets the course requirements but may not meet the GPA requirement. Achievement that satisfactorily meets the course and GPA requirements C/C+ (65-74) Significantly above requirements B/B+ (75-84) Achievement that is significantly above the course and GPA requirements Outstanding Marks Awarded A-/A (85-100) Achievement that is outstanding relative to the course and GPA requirements Clear introduction to the case. /10 Appropriate choice of case /10 Clear description of case from an EI point of view /15 Application of any of the following self-management tools to the case: Self-awareness, self-control, self-confidence, self-control, empathy and non-verbal communication to the case /20 Apply your knowledge of either Team building or Strategic communication or Developing others to the case. Recommendations on how EI can support the goals of the company in the case study Presentation is free from spelling/ grammar errors. /20 /15 /5 Students engages other students (audience) in the presentation. Total /5 /100 Week 2 HRM4033 MANAGING COMMUNICATIONS AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE FOR HRM Text book Chapters  Self-awareness/Self-control by Nadler (2010)  Self-confidence by Nadler (2010) Self-awareness Self-awareness  Self-awareness is about: Anticipating how others perceive you, evaluating yourself and your actions according to collective beliefs and values, and caring about how others evaluate you.  Self-awareness is not a destination point, but rather an emerging process where one continually comes to understand his or her unique talents, strengths, sense of purpose, core values, beliefs and desires. Self-awareness  Emotional intelligence has been identified as an important component of self-awareness and vice versa, self-awareness has been explicitly identified as a key component of emotional intelligence.  The self-awareness dimension includes emotional selfawareness, accurate self-assessment and selfconfidence. Self-awareness  Becoming more self-aware through increased awareness of how we are perceived by others is important for our emotional development.  It allows us to reflect upon the emotional impact our behaviors may have on others and can enable us to change our behaviors and regulate our emotions more efficiently.  This transcends into the workplace where emotional intelligence is important for job performance, constructive conflict management and enabling leaders to effectively manage their emotions in order to cope with organisational changes and adjust accordingly. Emotional Self-control Emotional Self-Control  Emotional Self-Control is demonstrated by a leader being able to manage impulsive and/or distressing feelings.  Leaders who are competent in Emotional Self-Control are able to stay composed, calm, and unflappable in stressful situations, regardless of the environment. They have control of their emotions versus their emotions controlling them. Emotional Self-Control  Leaders with Emotional Self-Control think clearly while under pressure.  Their IQ and executive functioning stay intact. One reason why Emotional Self-Control is so critical to focus on is that it is fragile and thus can be lost in a second with devastating effects. Stress  When stress is high, as it is in most organizations, it is critical that the leader be able to manage his or her stress as well as the teams’.  Leaders who are unable to manage their stress fall into the EQ, IQ Brain Drain Loop. When their EQ goes down it affects their IQ and their cognitive decision-making abilities.  A high stress environment would be expected to restrict leaders’ access to their full EQ and IQ potential. Emotions  Emotions are contagious, so if one person is emotionally hijacked on your team or in your organization, most likely others will catch it, like the flu.  Your team can quickly lose IQ points, thereby endangering executive decisions and deteriorating teamwork and collaboration. Emotional Self-Control  Leaders’ ability to manage their emotions then is paramount as they are the “emotional thermostat” for the team and can influence the team’s mood and productivity. Their emotions of the leader are the most contagious.  The Hay Group has found that the leader has a 50% to 70% influence over the climate of the team. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  1. SELF-AWARENESS: The first strategy for increasing Emotional Self-Control is to practice self-awareness.  2. Labelling of emotions - Try naming your emotions many times in the day to develop a refined language of your feelings. There are many feeling word lists that help you get beyond the preliminary level of bad, mad, sad, and glad. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  3. THE EMOTIONAL AUDIT A leadership tool that can help with both self-awareness and self-management is called the Emotional Audit. ❖ It is designed to ask strategic questions that can change the focus when a person is emotionally charged or about to get hijacked. ❖ When you are counting to 10 to calm down, ask these questions to better direct your brain’s thinking. This audit is helpful, especially if you are feeling “triggered” by someone or something. Wait five seconds until you get an answer to each question. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  To build your self-awareness and self-management, use the audit numerous times during the day. You may notice certain patterns in what triggers you, how you are feeling, and how you get in your own way as a result of unmanaged emotions. EMOTIONAL AUDIT 1. What am I thinking? (Accesses the basal ganglia, which integrate feelings, thoughts, and movements.) 2. What am I feeling? (Accesses the basal ganglia, which integrate feelings, thoughts, and movements, and the temporal lobes, which regulate emotional stability, by labeling affect or emotion, which allows you to “name it to tame it.”) 3. What do I want now? (Accesses the cerebellum, which carries out executive functions and connects to the prefrontal cortex, where cognitive integration takes place.) 4. How am I getting in my own way? (Accesses the prefrontal cortex, which allows you to learn from mistakes.) 5. What do I need to do differently now? 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  4. PUTTING ON THE BRAKES if we want to inhibit an impulse or urge we must consider the following: 1. We use up mental capacity each time we inhibit an emotion. 2. Once we are aware of the impulse, the window of time is quite small when we can exercise self-control and redirect our actions. 3. Each time we redirect our action, that pathway gets stronger 4. Awareness or mindfulness can help increase our choices or solutions. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  5. MINDFULNESS Being mindful, having mindful awareness is often defined as a way of intentionally paying attention to the present moment without being swept away with judgments. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  6. SHUTTLING EXERCISE: INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL AWARENESS An exercise that can enhance mindfulness is to be purposefully aware of your external surroundings and then your internal sensations. Shuttling between them focuses you on your here-and-now experience in the moment. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  For example, I am aware of the following as I study: • I am aware of the music I am listening to. • I am aware of my breath. • I am aware of the clicking of the keys as I type. • I am aware of my feet crossed underneath me. • I am aware of the flashing light of the memory stick. • I am aware of rocking back in the chair. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  This exercise can bring you right back into the moment and center you. You can also be aware of your tendency to drift off into thoughts or your internal narrative as you do this exercise, with such thoughts as, “This is hard. How long do I have to keep doing this? Will this really work for me?” Again be your best friend here without criticizing yourself how you are doing this exercise. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  7. IDENTIFYING TRIGGERS Another exercise that can help with Self-Awareness and Emotional Self-Control is to identify your main triggers. A trigger is something that gets you upset, irritated, or impatient. Make a list of your main triggers that could get your amygdala aroused. Triggers usually are things that others do that irritate you and, less frequently, can be something about yourself. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  Another way to look at it is to ask, “What are the things that not only irritate me but also drain my mental capacity?” Some examples include the following: ❖ People interrupting you ❖ Someone not honoring your values ❖ People who seem incompetent ❖ Someone who talks too much 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  8. REAPPRAISAL Reappraisal is a technique drawn from psychotherapy and cognitive restructuring where you give an experience or situation a new, different, and more constructive meaning. The questioning process “lights up” executive functioning like the questions of the Emotional Audit. 8 STRATEGIES FOR EMOTIONAL SELFCONTROL  If you find yourself with distressing emotions, you can ask yourself questions like the following: ❖ What can I learn from this? ❖ How can I turn this into a meaningful experience for me? ❖ What would I tell someone else to do in this situation? Self-confidence Self-confidence Self-confidence  Confidence is knowing one’s own abilities and having enough faith in them to make sound decisions in the face of uncertainty and pressure.  A confident leader exudes a strong self-presentation and expresses him-or herself in an assured, impressive, and unhesitating manner.  The confident leader will take on new challenges and hold on to his or her view, even if others disagree. Self-confidence  Confidence is the fuel to take risks, try new things, and make the micro-initiatives necessary to become a Star.  Many leaders have “faulty evaluation systems.” They are rarely satisfied when successful and are overly critical of their performance even if they win and win big. This can become a rigid pattern. In the past it may have driven them to great successes, but over time it can become a burden. Self-confidence  When we reflect on our thinking, we usually ask ourselves a series of questions, such as: What am I going to do about this project? Why is my co-worker so uncooperative? Why did I get passed over at the last promotion? This is an unconscious process that stimulates the answers. The brain has been compared to a computer, even though it is far more complex. Self-confidence  When we ask ourselves a question, our brain runs through its files to bring up an answer on our screen of awareness. We take this answer as a fact and move forward without questioning the process. If we ask ourselves poor or unconstructive questions, we will get answers that are negative and not helpful or proactive. Self-confidence  Another strategy to enhance confidence is to write a log of past successes, broken into a chronology by age bracket. We all have had many successes in our life, which are easy to forget or minimize. These successes can leave footprints for future successes. And, you can build your confidence by simply reviewing the list. Self-confidence  The power of visualization has been well-documented in sports and theater performance. To improve your confidence, a regular visualization of mastering your most challenging situations will be helpful.  You imagine yourself in the situation, performing exactly the way you want to perform. This kind of pre-practice informs your nervous system and helps create neural pathways to make the performance more natural. Please read additional material Week 7 HRM4033 MANAGING COMMUNICATIONS AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE FOR HRM Communicating Strategically – PART 2 Planning contributes greatly to success.  Some key questions to consider at the start of the process are: ❑ Where are you now and where do you want to be?  What will you need to do to get there? ❑ What role can communication, education and training play to achieve your goals? ❑ How will you learn from your experiences en route? ❑ The 10 steps for communication planning are: 1. Analysis of the issue and the role of communication. 2. Selecting target groups/audiences and stakeholders. 3. Determining the communication targets. 4. Developing the strategy and selecting partners. 5. Determining the messages. 6. Selecting the communication means. 7. Organising communication and briefing partners. 8. Planning (in terms of milestones and activities) 9. Budgeting of activities. 10. Monitoring and evaluation Strategic Communication  Strategic communication is planned and accomplishes a purpose.  Strategic communication is targeted to a particular audience or audiences.  Strategic communication is designed and delivered to produce the desired outcomes which may be changes in policy, practices of an organisation or individual behaviour.  Strategic communication aims to achieve results with the best possible use of time and resources. Strategic Communication  Before you develop a communication strategy, you must know clearly what the issue is and if and how communication can contribute to solving it. Understanding the real issues underpins designing a communication strategy;  Before you develop a communication plan, you must first know which target groups you want to reach. Determine your communication targets Communication targets should be: • clear about the results to be achieved, be specific and measurable; • realistic, feasible and acceptable; • about motivating a change in knowledge, attitudes or behaviour by being neither too ambitious nor too ‘weak; • indicating when the results should be achieved. Three categories of potential communication targets  Providing knowledge: when the target groups are not, or insufficiently, informed; do not have information about the problem at hand; the cause and effect relationship; or potential solutions, then the communication target is aimed at developing the appropriate knowledge and understanding. Example: Residents of a protected area do not realize that their fishing methods will harm the environment and will decrease chances of future income. Three categories of potential communication targets  Changing attitudes: when target groups have the ‘wrong’ attitude about the problem or issue or towards potential solutions, then the communication target relates making a shift in that attitude, so that at least the attitude does not negatively impact on the conservation issue.  Changing behaviour: when the target groups behave in a way which endangers biodiversity, then the target of communication is to stop or change that behaviour. Example: Hunting in a protected area. Frequently made mistakes in communication planning  no proper definition of objectives  the objective of the communication activity is not properly defined or is too vague;  the objectives are too ambitious to achieve;  communication experts are not involved in defining the objectives and planning the interventions, but are only tasked to communicate the plan or policy to the stakeholders with minimal or no budget;  there is lack of knowledge of what is precisely wanted from the target groups and what is required to achieve the results; Frequently made mistakes in communication planning  communication goals are set to change other people's behaviour and values, without understanding how the behaviour change can take place;  the fact that people need social, economic or other benefits for any kind of behaviour change is not considered when objectives are defined;  indicators are not defined for the communication targets/objectives, making evaluation of the outcome difficult. What broad approach are you going to use to communicate?  The next step is to plan how in broad terms you are going to communicate with the target group to achieve your objectives.  Frequently made mistakes in communication planning: ❑ Over loading the audience with facts and information without understanding their level of understanding and needs. ❑ Thinking that information and facts are the best means to convince people to adopt a particular way of thinking. ❑ Not realizing that expert information is not always acceptable to the audience; that it may be too scientific or unappealing. The audience then decides that the information is not relevant for them. Pre-testing  Pre-testing a message is often neglected, though this is a vital step.  When pre- testing a ‘sample’ of the communication message is presented to the target group to check: • if the message is understood • if the message is accepted and agreed upon • if the tone of voice and message design appeals • the effect of the message on the target group • unexpected interpretations of message Pre-testing messages  Comprehension: Does the target group comprehend the messages? Are there unexpected interpretations of your message?  Relevance: Does the target group feel that the materials are tailored for them?  Noticeable: Do the materials attract attention of the target group?  Memorable: Does the target group remember the message after a few exposures?  Credibility: Does the target group trust the message/sender/source? Pre-testing messages  Acceptability: Do the materials and messages connect to the values and culture of the target group? Can you detect mistakes that you can now avoid?  Attractiveness: Would the target group pick up the flyer, stop to read the poster or watch the TV commercial that was prepared?  ‘KAP’ changes: After being exposed to the materials, did the target group increase its knowledge about the subject or change its attitudes, beliefs or behavioural intentions? Selecting communication means  Does the “means” help reach the communication target ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Team Building

NAME
INSTITUTION
DATE

Emotional Intelligence (EI)
 Peter Solavey and John Mayer mentions EI as "the

subset of social intelligence that involves the ability
to monitor one's own and others' feelings and
emotions, to discriminate among them and to use
this information to guide one's thinking and
actions.” (Abraham, 2016)
 EI can be used to analyze a Case in Team building by
using its four concepts: Perceiving, Understanding,
reasoning, and finally managing the emotions.
(Abraham, 2016)

Case Study
 Using EI to analyze the Case study researched by Carl

Robinson, which is on ten team members. The team of
engineers is managed by a Senior Vice President, although
Engineers are perceived as individuals who operate well but
have interpersonally adept habits. (Robinson, 2017)
 Therefore this case study lacked interpersonally adept
individuals leading to bad performance and time wasted
complaining rather than addressing the issue.
 Each team member complained about one member, who cant
be trusted even though he performed well.
 Low interpersonal adept...

NicholasI (30263)
Duke University

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