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University of Phoenix English Lesson Unit Plan Template

University of Phoenix

Question Description

Need help with my English question - I’m studying for my class.

So i have already created a lesson plan. please use it as an example to fill out the 3 day unit plan templet. This is for an English class. Grades 6-8. The state is NY and you can find the ela standards at: http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/

Please take a look at the rubric before starting and feel free to contact me with any questions.

Pay particular attention to the following:

  • In the “Depth of Knowledge” section: Include higher-order thinking strategies, problem solving techniques, and encouragement of active participation.
  • In the “Multiple Means of Engagement” section: Include the use of technology to allow students to become active participants in their learning and in assessing their progress .
  • In the “Multiple Means of Expression” section: Demonstrate the alignment of instruction and assessments .

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GCU College of Education LESSON UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE Section 1: Lesson Preparation Teacher Candidate Name: Grade Level: Unit/Subject: Title of Unit and Brief Summary: Create a title for each lesson and 1-2 sentences summarizing the lesson, identifying the central focus based on the content and skills you are teaching. Classroom and Student Factors/Grouping: Describe the important classroom factors (demographics and environment) and student factors (IEPs, 504s, ELLs, students with behavior concerns, gifted learners), and the effect of those factors on planning, teaching, and assessing students to facilitate learning for all students. This should be limited to 2-3 sentences and the information should inform the differentiation components of the lesson. Day 1 Day 2 National/State Learning Standards List specific grade-level standards that are the focus of the lesson being presented. Specific Learning Target(s)/Objectives Based on state standards, identify what is intended to be measured in learning. Academic Language General academic vocabulary and contentspecific vocabulary included in the unit. © 2020. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Day 3 Unit Resources, Materials, Equipment, and Technology List all resources, materials, equipment, and technology to be used in the unit. Depth of Knowledge Lesson Questions What questions can be posed throughout the lesson to assess all levels of student understanding? • Level 1: Recall • Level 2: Skill/Concepts • Level 3: Strategic Thinking • Level 4: Extended Thinking Section 2: Instructional Planning Day 1 Day 2 Anticipatory Set How will students’ prior knowledge be activated as well as gain student interest in the upcoming content? Presentation of Content Multiple Means of Representation Describe how content will be presented in various ways to meet the needs of different learners. © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved Day 3 Multiple Means of Representation Differentiation Explain how materials will be differentiated for each of the following groups: • English Language Learners (ELL) • Students with special needs • Students with gifted abilities • Early finishers (those who finish early and may need additional sources/support) Application of Content Multiple Means of Engagement How will students explore, practice, and apply the content? Multiple Means of Engagement Differentiation Explain how materials will be differentiated for each of the following groups: • English Language Learners (ELL) • Students with special needs • Students with gifted abilities • Early finishers (those who finish © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved early and may need additional sources/support) Assessment of Content Multiple Means of Expression Formative and summative assessments used to monitor student progress and modify instruction. Multiple Means of Expression Differentiation Explain how materials will be differentiated for each of the following groups: • English Language Learners (ELL) • Students with special needs • Students with gifted abilities • Early finishers (those who finish early and may need additional resources/support) Extension Activity and/or Homework Identify and describe any extension activities or homework tasks as appropriate. Explain how the extension activity or homework assignment supports the learning targets/objectives. As required by your instructor, attach any copies of © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved homework at the end of this template. © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved English 9 Romeo and Juliet Unit Unit Goal- The learner will demonstrate understanding of and evaluate various literary concepts, elements, and terms. Lesson Plan #1 (90 minute block) Teacher Objectives: The learner will: 1 Identify the literary devices within the work. 2 Apply knowledge of the literary devices. 3 Evaluate Shakespeare’s use of stated literary devices in the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet and determine how they move the rising action of the story forward. Materials needed: 1. Highlighters 2. Copies of the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet 3. Textbook Procedure: 1. The previous lesson was spent defining the following literary devices: simile, metaphor, personification, tone, mood, diction, style, allusion. Students will be given a brief formative assessment to determine which terms the students remembered from the previous lesson. (10 minutes) 2. The class will read Act II scene ii from Romeo and Juliet aloud. Two students will volunteer to read for the parts of Romeo and Juliet. (15 minutes) 3. Upon completion of the scene, the teacher will ask clarifying questions pertaining to the scene (questions will be low level to check for quick understanding). a. How can you summarize what Romeo and Juliet what talking about? b. What plans did they make for the next day? c. Do you believe Romeo and Juliet are in love? 4. Upon completion of the scene, and after the teacher has asked predetermined questions and answered any additional clarifying questions, students will be partnered according to ability. Students will review the text from the balcony scene then identify and highlight the literary devices within the scene. (25 minutes). 5. Class will volunteer examples of literary devices and any clarification needed will be answered appropriately. Questions include (but are not limited to) the following: 1. What makes “It is the east, and Juliet is the sun” a metaphor? 2. Why is “Arise fair sun and kill the envious moon” personification? (10 minutes) 6. Students will complete a graphic organizer evaluating Shakespeare’s use of literary devices in the balcony scene. The teacher will explain the directions and allow time for clarifying questions. Once the students begin, the teacher will circulate to check for understanding. *See Romeo and Juliet Graphic Organizer* (30 minutes) Directions: Give examples of the following literary device (either one you create on your own or one directly from the text). 1. Simile - 2. Metaphor- 3. Personification- 4. Tone- 5. Mood- 6. Diction- 7. Style- 8. Allusion- Romeo and Juliet Graphic Organizer Directions: Identify one of each of the following literary devices you discovered in the balcony scene. In one to two sentences, evaluate the affect that specific device has on the balcony scene as the rising action. Then, write a similar example of how it could be used in modern day terms. For example, to create a specific tone, how would a modern day writer (or a movie director) accomplish that? Simile : Metaphor: Effect on scene: Effect on scene: Modern day version: Modern day version: Personification: Allusion: Effect on scene: Effect on scene: Modern day version: Modern day version: Tone: Mood: Effect on scene: Effect on scene: Modern day version: Modern day version: Diction: Style : Effect on scene: Effect on scene: Modern day version: Modern day version: Lesson Plan # 2 The learner will: 1. Identify theme from previous stories 2. Create a theme for Romeo and Juliet Materials needed: 1. Dry erase markers 1. Through direct teaching, students will be given the definition for theme and the five factors that help determine theme. (10 minutes) 2. Students will reflect on past stories read in class and determine themes for those stories.(10 minutes) 3. Students will participate in Graffiti (a brainstorming technique) in order to determine theme. The process followed for Graffiti is as follows: a. The teacher writes the title Romeo and Juliet on the board. b. Every student is given a dry erase marker. c. The teacher explains the directions. This is a silent activity. Everyone is expected to go to the board at least once. Once at the board, the student must either draw a symbol or write a word, phrase or idea that occurs to them when they think of the characters and the actions that take place within Romeo and Juliet. They can do this anywhere on the board surrounding the title. The teacher acts a facilitator and writes the first phrase on the board (ex: true love; feuding families) or draws a picture (ex: a balcony, a rose). The students then go to the board (no more than two at time) and continue the process. At this point, they are not allowed to verbally comment on each other’s words or drawings, but they are allowed to make extensions on each other’s words, phrases or drawings. If there is a lull in the flow of ideas, the teacher makes an extension on a student’s item in order to facilitate more ideas. The process continues until no more ideas can be generated. (typically lasts no longer than 30 minutes) 4. Once Graffiti has been completed, the students are given a few minutes to reevaluate the board. On a piece of paper, they will write down what they feel are the three best words, phrases or representations of Romeo and Juliet. Going around the room, each student has to give one item off of their list and explain he/ she picked it. (15 minutes) 5. Using the three ideas generated from Graffiti, the students must create a theme for Romeo and Juliet. 6. The teacher will circulate around the room to work with students on their themes. (Students will also be reminded to create a theme using the factors given earlier) The teacher will check to make sure theme falls under the five factors. (20 minutes) 7. Students will share themes with the class. Every student must specify what led them to choose that particular theme. The class is then instructed that tomorrow, we will take the idea of literary devices and theme a step further. For homework, they are to “clean up” their theme. The teacher will clarify any questions. (5 minutes) Lesson #3 The learner will: Evaluate the effect Shakespeare’s use of literary devices has on theme. Materials needed: Student generated copies of theme Copies of balcony scene A and balcony scene B 1. Students will partner up and share their themes from the previous lesson. (5 minutes) 2. The teacher will clarify any lingering questions about theme and how to identify it. (5 minutes). 3. The teacher will pass out two versions of the balcony scene. One will be the original copy that was looked at the day before (Balcony Scene Hand Out A), and one will be the balcony scene rewritten without any literary devices (Balcony Scene Hand Out B). This balcony scene will be “straight to the point”. Students will first be asked to reread the first balcony scene and then the second balcony scene silently. (10 minutes) 4. Students will be given graphic organizers. One half of the class will be given comparison graphic organizers. The other half of the class will be given contrast graphic organizers. Students will work in pairs and either compare or contrast the two balcony scenes based on diction, style, and tone.( Comparison Graphic Organizer & Contrast Graphic Organizer) (20 minutes) 5. Upon completion of graphic organizers, the class will discuss their findings in the following way: a. What similarities were found between the two scenes? b. What differences were found between the two scenes? c. What effect did a lack of literary devices have on the scene? (was the effect positive or negative?) d. Why do you think Shakespeare chose to include the devices in the scene? e. What scene affects the reader more: the scene with the devices or the scene without? Why? f. What insights did you as a reader have when working on your graphic organizer? (20 minutes) 7. Students will compose an essay in which they reflect on the following question: How does Shakespeare use of figurative language in the balcony scene affect the reader’s interpretation of the theme. The student will have to indentify the theme they came up with the day before, give specific examples of the literary devices and how they contributed to the theme. (See Reflection Journal) (30 minutes) Romeo and Juliet H.O #1 [Capulet's orchard.] ROMEO [Coming forward.]: But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the East, and Juliet is the sun! Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon Who is already sick and pale with grief That thou her maid art far more fair than she. Be not her maid, since she is envious. Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it. Cast it off. It is my lady! O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were! She speaks, yet she says nothing. What of that? Her eye discourses; I will answer it. I am too bold; 'tis not to me she speaks. Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return. What if her eyes were there, they in her head? The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright That birds would sing and think it were not night. See how she leans her cheek upon her hand! O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek! JULIET : Ay me! ROMEO: She speaks. O, speak again, bright angel, for thou art As glorious to this night, being o'er my head, As is a winged messenger of heaven Unto the white-upturned wond'ring eyes Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him When he bestrides the lazy puffing clouds And sails upon the bosom of the air. JULIET: O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name; Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I'll no longer be a Capulet. ROMEO [Aside.]: Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this? JULIET: 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. What's Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot, Nor arm, nor face. O, be some other name Belonging to a man. What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other word would smell as sweet. So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name; And for thy name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself. ROMEO: I take thee at thy word. Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized; Henceforth I never will be Romeo. JULIET: What man art thou, that, thus bescreened in night, So stumblest on my counsel? ROMEO: By a name I know not how to tell thee who I am. My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself Because it is an enemy to thee. Had I it written, I would tear the word. JULIET: My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words Of thy tongue's uttering, yet I know the sound. Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague? ROMEO: Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike. JULIET: How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore? The orchard walls are high and hard to climb, And the place death, considering who thou art, If any of my kinsmen find thee here. ROMEO: With love's light wings did I o'erperch these walls; For stony limits cannot hold love out, And what love can do, that dares love attempt. Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me. JULIET: If they do see thee, they will murder thee. ROMEO: Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye Than twenty of their swords! Look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity. JULIET: I would not for the world they saw thee here. ROMEO: I have night's cloak to hide me from their eyes; And but thou love me, let them find me here. My life were better ended by their hate Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love. JULIET: By whose direction found'st thou out this place? ROMEO: By Love, that first did prompt me to inquire. He lent me council, and I lent him eyes. I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far As that vast shore washed with the farthest sea, I should adventure for such merchandise. JULIET: Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face; Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight. Fain would I dwell on form --fain, fain deny What I have spoke; but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say "Ay;" And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear'st, Thou mayst prove false. At lovers' perjuries, They say Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo, If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully. Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won, I'll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo, but else, not for the world. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond, And therefore thou mayst think my havior light; But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true Than those that have more cunning to be strange. I should have been more strange, I must confess, But that thou overheard'st, ere I was ware, My true love passion. Therefore pardon me, And not impute this yielding to light love, Which the dark night hath so discovered. ROMEO: Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow, That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops-JULIET: O, swear not by the moon, th' inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circle orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable. ROMEO: What shall I swear by? JULIET: Do not swear at all; Or if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self, Which is the god of my idolatry, And I'll believe thee. ROMEO: If my heart's dear love-JULIET: Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say it lightens. Sweet, good night! This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath, May prove a beauteous flow'r when next we meet. Good ROMEO:night, good night! As sweet repose and rest Come to thy heart as that within my breast! ROMEO: O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied? JULIET: What satisfaction canst thou have to-night? ROMEO: The exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine. JULIET: I gave thee mine before thou didst request it: and yet I would it were to give again. ROMEO: Would'st thou withdraw it? for what purpose, love? JULIET: But to be frank and give it thee again. And yet I wish but for the thing I have. My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite. I hear some noise within. Dear love, adieu! [NURSE calls within.] Anon good nurse! Sweet Montague, be true. Stay but a little, I will come again. [Exit.] ROMEO: O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard, Being in night, all this is but a dream, Too flattering-sweet to be substantial. [Enter JULIET again.] JULIET: Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed. If that thy bent of love be honorable, Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow, By one that I'll procure to come to thee, Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite; And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay And follow thee my lord throughout the world. [NURSE within.] Madam! JULIET: I come anon.--But if thou meanest not well, I do beseech thee-[NURSE within.] Madam! JULIET: By and by I come.-To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief Tomorrow will I send. So thrive my soul-JULIET: A thousand times good night! ROMEO: A thousand times the worse, to want thy light! Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books But love from love, toward school with heavy looks [Enter JULIET again] JULIET: Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falc'ner's voice To lure this tassel gentle back again! Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud, Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies And make her airy tongue more hoarse than With repetition of "My Romeo!" ROMEO: How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, Like softest music to attending ears! JULIET: Romeo! ROMEO: My sweet? JULIET: What o'clock tomorrow Shall I send to thee? ROMEO: By the hour of nine. JULIET: I will not fail. 'Tis twenty years till then. I have forgot why I did call thee back. ROMEO: Let me stand here till thou remember it. JULIET: I shall forget, to have thee still stand there, Rememb'ring how I love thy company. ROMEO: And I'll still stay, to have thee still forget, Forgetting any other home but this. JULIET: 'Tis almost morning. I would have thee gone-And yet no farther than a wanton's bird, That le ...
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GCU College of Education

LESSON UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE
Section 1: Lesson Preparation
Teacher Candidate Name:
Grade Level: Grades 6-8
Unit/Subject: English
Title of Unit and Brief Summary: Romeo and Juliet. The learner will demonstrate understanding of and evaluate various literary
concepts, elements, and terms. It will also help in the identification of themes provided in a text.
Classroom and Student Factors/Grouping: The classroom will incorporate the needs of all learners by encouraging flexibility and
adoption of various learning techniques. Inclusion of these factors will require some adjustments to methods used to teach and assess
the progress of the learners.
National/State
Learning Standards
List specific grade-level
standards that are the focus
of the lesson being
presented.

Specific Learning
Target(s)/Objectives
Based on state standards,
identify what is intended to
be measured in learning.

Academic Language
General academic
vocabulary and content-

Day 1
Close reading for the determination of
the explicit and implicit meaning of
the text
Identification of text aspects that
determine the point of view of author,
objective, or stance.

Day 2
Analysis of how texts addresses same
topics or themes to build knowledge
Drawing evidence from informational
text for supporting reflection and
analysis.
Interpretation of phrases and words
applicable in the text, including the
determination of figurative, technical,
and connotative meaning.

Day 3
Demonstrating understanding of
figurative language as well nuances in
the meaning of words.
Acquisition and accurate application of
content-specific and general academic
words as applied in the text.
Determination or clarification of
meaning of multiple-meaning and
unknown phrases or words.

Identify the literary devices within the
work.
Application of knowledge of the
literary devices.

Learners to identify the themes for
past stories.
The ability to create themes from the
provided text.

Evaluation of the impact of
Shakespeare’s use of literary devices has
on theme.

Diction
Tone
Personification
Allusion

Graffiti
Brainstorming
Feuding families
True love

Figurative language
Theme
Balcony scene
Graphic organizers

© 2020. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

specific vocabulary
included in the unit.

Unit Resources,
Materials, Equipment,
and Technology
List all resources,
materials, equipment, and
technology to be used in the
unit.

Depth of Knowledge
Lesson Questions
What questions can be
posed throughout the lesson
to assess all levels of
student understanding?
• Level 1: Recall
• Level 2: Skill/Concepts
• Level 3: Strategic
Thinking
• Level 4...

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