Computer Science
ITS 832 University of Cumberlands CH16 Technology on Renewable Energy Sources Paper

ITS 832

University of cumberlands

ITS

Question Description

I’m trying to learn for my Computer Science class and I’m stuck. Can you help?

write a short research paper for a peer-reviewed research paper that pertains to the week’s assigned reading. This will be a detailed summary of the research paper and what you gained from the research. Each week, you will find an article/peer-reviewed research paper that pertains to the week's assignment. If you have a difficult time, Google Scholar is a wonderful location to find these types of articles:

https://scholar.google.com/

Once you find the article, you will simply read it and then write a review of it. Think of it as an article review where you submit a short overview of the article.

*All outside sources must be referenced and cited in your paper. All papers will be reviewed with a plagiarism software. Any references not properly referenced and cited will result in a 0 on your paper. Multiple violations will result in a failure for the course!

Note :

Attachment contains chapter 16 PDF tutorial and please choose the topic from that.

Also attached the text book PDF

Make sure Plagiarism Free.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

ITS 832 CHAPTER 16 ANALYSIS OF FIVE POLICY CASES IN THE FIELD OF ENERGY POLICY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY DR. JORDON SHAW OVERVIEW • Introduction • Theoretical grounds of policy implementation • Approaches to policy implementation • Five case studies • Lessons learned • Conclusion INTRODUCTION • Population and burning fossil fuels • Factors of high pollution • Environmental policy is high priority • Most nations initiated projects to improve climate • Focus • • Sustainable energy management Renewable energy sources • Five case studies on climate change and energy use • Comparative investigation • • • What approaches are used? How can implications be measured? How easily can approaches be applied to other domains? THEORETICAL GROUNDS OF POLICY IMPLEMENTATION • Policy implementation • Turning theory into practice • Gaps often occur / Formulated versus implemented policy • Instruments for climate change policy • • • • • Financial measures Legal / regulatory instruments Organizational measures Certificates or marketable permits / quotas Policy instruments for renewable energy • • • • • Regulations and standards Quantity instruments Price instruments Public procurement Auction APPROACHES TO POLICY IMPLEMENTATION • Top-down • Policies are communicated from policy-makers • Bottom-up • Focus is on policy implementers • Macro- and micro-implementation • Macro -Government -> local authorities • Micro – Local government -> local polices • Principal-agent theory • Policy makers (principals) delegate responsibility to officials (agents) INVESTIGATING FIVE CASE STUDIES • Assessing the EU Policy Package in Climate Change and Renewables • German Nuclear Phase-Out and Energy Transition Policy • KNOWBRIDGE: Cross-Border Knowledge Bridge in the RES Cluster in East Slovakia and North Hungary • KSR’s Strategy for the Use of Renewable Energy Sources • MODEL: Management of Domains Related to Energy in Local Authorities LESSONS LEARNED • Main common focus • Renewable energy sources • Some projects defined clear goals • Dates • Quantifiable targets • Others focused on long-term strategies • Precise targets versus investigating issues • Biggest takeaway • Involving consumers in policy making increases implementation success CONCLUSION • • Climate change and transition to RES is a serious issue Awareness is growing • But not fast enough • Public policy is necessary to move away from fossil fuels • Projects show how RES can be possible and sustainable • However • • Transition to RES is expensive One reason for slow adoption Public Administration and Information Technology Volume 10 Series Editor Christopher G. Reddick San Antonio, Texas, USA w.jager@rug.nl More information about this series at http://www.springer.com/series/10796 w.jager@rug.nl Marijn Janssen • Maria A. Wimmer Ameneh Deljoo Editors Policy Practice and Digital Science Integrating Complex Systems, Social Simulation and Public Administration in Policy Research 2123 w.jager@rug.nl Editors Marijn Janssen Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management Delft University of Technology Delft The Netherlands Ameneh Deljoo Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management Delft University of Technology Delft The Netherlands Maria A. Wimmer Institute for Information Systems Research University of Koblenz-Landau Koblenz Germany ISBN 978-3-319-12783-5 ISBN 978-3-319-12784-2 (eBook) Public Administration and Information Technology DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-12784-2 Library of Congress Control Number: 2014956771 Springer Cham Heidelberg New York London © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015 This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved by the Publisher, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in any other physical way, and transmission or information storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter developed. The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, service marks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use. The publisher, the authors and the editors are safe to assume that the advice and information in this book are believed to be true and accurate at the date of publication. Neither the publisher nor the authors or the editors give a warranty, express or implied, with respect to the material contained herein or for any errors or omissions that may have been made. Printed on acid-free paper Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media (www.springer.com) w.jager@rug.nl Preface The last economic and financial crisis has heavily threatened European and other economies around the globe. Also, the Eurozone crisis, the energy and climate change crises, challenges of demographic change with high unemployment rates, and the most recent conflicts in the Ukraine and the near East or the Ebola virus disease in Africa threaten the wealth of our societies in different ways. The inability to predict or rapidly deal with dramatic changes and negative trends in our economies and societies can seriously hamper the wealth and prosperity of the European Union and its Member States as well as the global networks. These societal and economic challenges demonstrate an urgent need for more effective and efficient processes of governance and policymaking, therewith specifically addressing crisis management and economic/welfare impact reduction. Therefore, investing in the exploitation of innovative information and communication technology (ICT) in the support of good governance and policy modeling has become a major effort of the European Union to position itself and its Member States well in the global digital economy. In this realm, the European Union has laid out clear strategic policy objectives for 2020 in the Europe 2020 strategy1 : In a changing world, we want the EU to become a smart, sustainable, and inclusive economy. These three mutually reinforcing priorities should help the EU and the Member States deliver high levels of employment, productivity, and social cohesion. Concretely, the Union has set five ambitious objectives—on employment, innovation, education, social inclusion, and climate/energy—to be reached by 2020. Along with this, Europe 2020 has established four priority areas—smart growth, sustainable growth, inclusive growth, and later added: A strong and effective system of economic governance—designed to help Europe emerge from the crisis stronger and to coordinate policy actions between the EU and national levels. To specifically support European research in strengthening capacities, in overcoming fragmented research in the field of policymaking, and in advancing solutions for 1 Europe 2020 http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/index_en.htm v w.jager@rug.nl vi Preface ICT supported governance and policy modeling, the European Commission has cofunded an international support action called eGovPoliNet2 . The overall objective of eGovPoliNet was to create an international, cross-disciplinary community of researchers working on ICT solutions for governance and policy modeling. In turn, the aim of this community was to advance and sustain research and to share the insights gleaned from experiences in Europe and globally. To achieve this, eGovPoliNet established a dialogue, brought together experts from distinct disciplines, and collected and analyzed knowledge assets (i.e., theories, concepts, solutions, findings, and lessons on ICT solutions in the field) from different research disciplines. It built on case material accumulated by leading actors coming from distinct disciplinary backgrounds and brought together the innovative knowledge in the field. Tools, methods, and cases were drawn from the academic community, the ICT sector, specialized policy consulting firms as well as from policymakers and governance experts. These results were assembled in a knowledge base and analyzed in order to produce comparative analyses and descriptions of cases, tools, and scientific approaches to enrich a common knowledge base accessible via www.policy-community.eu. This book, entitled “Policy Practice and Digital Science—Integrating Complex Systems, Social Simulation, and Public Administration in Policy Research,” is one of the exciting results of the activities of eGovPoliNet—fusing community building activities and activities of knowledge analysis. It documents findings of comparative analyses and brings in experiences of experts from academia and from case descriptions from all over the globe. Specifically, it demonstrates how the explosive growth in data, computational power, and social media creates new opportunities for policymaking and research. The book provides a first comprehensive look on how to take advantage of the development in the digital world with new approaches, concepts, instruments, and methods to deal with societal and computational complexity. This requires the knowledge traditionally found in different disciplines including public administration, policy analyses, information systems, complex systems, and computer science to work together in a multidisciplinary fashion and to share approaches. This book provides the foundation for strongly multidisciplinary research, in which the various developments and disciplines work together from a comprehensive and holistic policymaking perspective. A wide range of aspects for social and professional networking and multidisciplinary constituency building along the axes of technology, participative processes, governance, policy modeling, social simulation, and visualization are tackled in the 19 papers. With this book, the project makes an effective contribution to the overall objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy by providing a better understanding of different approaches to ICT enabled governance and policy modeling, and by overcoming the fragmented research of the past. This book provides impressive insights into various theories, concepts, and solutions of ICT supported policy modeling and how stakeholders can be more actively engaged in public policymaking. It draws conclusions 2 eGovPoliNet is cofunded under FP 7, Call identifier FP7-ICT-2011-7, URL: www.policycommunity.eu w.jager@rug.nl Preface vii of how joint multidisciplinary research can bring more effective and resilient findings for better predicting dramatic changes and negative trends in our economies and societies. It is my great pleasure to provide the preface to the book resulting from the eGovPoliNet project. This book presents stimulating research by researchers coming from all over Europe and beyond. Congratulations to the project partners and to the authors!—Enjoy reading! Thanassis Chrissafis Project officer of eGovPoliNet European Commission DG CNECT, Excellence in Science, Digital Science w.jager@rug.nl Contents 1 Introduction to Policy-Making in the Digital Age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marijn Janssen and Maria A. Wimmer 2 Educating Public Managers and Policy Analysts in an Era of Informatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Koliba and Asim Zia 15 The Quality of Social Simulation: An Example from Research Policy Modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petra Ahrweiler and Nigel Gilbert 35 3 1 4 Policy Making and Modelling in a Complex World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wander Jager and Bruce Edmonds 5 From Building a Model to Adaptive Robust Decision Making Using Systems Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erik Pruyt 75 Features and Added Value of Simulation Models Using Different Modelling Approaches Supporting Policy-Making: A Comparative Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dragana Majstorovic, Maria A.Wimmer, Roy Lay-Yee, Peter Davis and Petra Ahrweiler 95 6 57 7 A Comparative Analysis of Tools and Technologies for Policy Making . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Eleni Kamateri, Eleni Panopoulou, Efthimios Tambouris, Konstantinos Tarabanis, Adegboyega Ojo, Deirdre Lee and David Price 8 Value Sensitive Design of Complex Product Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Andreas Ligtvoet, Geerten van de Kaa, Theo Fens, Cees van Beers, Paulier Herder and Jeroen van den Hoven ix w.jager@rug.nl x Contents 9 Stakeholder Engagement in Policy Development: Observations and Lessons from International Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Natalie Helbig, Sharon Dawes, Zamira Dzhusupova, Bram Klievink and Catherine Gerald Mkude 10 Values in Computational Models Revalued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Rebecca Moody and Lasse Gerrits 11 The Psychological Drivers of Bureaucracy: Protecting the Societal Goals of an Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Tjeerd C. Andringa 12 Active and Passive Crowdsourcing in Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Euripidis Loukis and Yannis Charalabidis 13 Management of Complex Systems: Toward Agent-Based Gaming for Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 Wander Jager and Gerben van der Vegt 14 The Role of Microsimulation in the Development of Public Policy . . . 305 Roy Lay-Yee and Gerry Cotterell 15 Visual Decision Support for Policy Making: Advancing Policy Analysis with Visualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 Tobias Ruppert, Jens Dambruch, Michel Krämer, Tina Balke, Marco Gavanelli, Stefano Bragaglia, Federico Chesani, Michela Milano and Jörn Kohlhammer 16 Analysis of Five Policy Cases in the Field of Energy Policy . . . . . . . . . 355 Dominik Bär, Maria A.Wimmer, Jozef Glova, Anastasia Papazafeiropoulou and Laurence Brooks 17 Challenges to Policy-Making in Developing Countries and the Roles of Emerging Tools, Methods and Instruments: Experiences from Saint Petersburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Dmitrii Trutnev, Lyudmila Vidyasova and Andrei Chugunov 18 Sustainable Urban Development, Governance and Policy: A Comparative Overview of EU Policies and Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Diego Navarra and Simona Milio 19 eParticipation, Simulation Exercise and Leadership Training in Nigeria: Bridging the Digital Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Tanko Ahmed w.jager@rug.nl Contributors Tanko Ahmed National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPSS), Jos, Nigeria Petra Ahrweiler EA European Academy of Technology and Innovation Assessment GmbH, Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler, Germany Tjeerd C. Andringa University College Groningen, Institute of Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Engineering (ALICE), University of Groningen, AB, Groningen, the Netherlands Tina Balke University of Surrey, Surrey, UK Dominik Bär University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany Cees van Beers Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Stefano Bragaglia University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Laurence Brooks Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK Yannis Charalabidis University of the Aegean, Samos, Greece Federico Chesani University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Andrei Chugunov ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia Gerry Cotterell Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS Research Centre), University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Jens Dambruch Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research, Darmstadt, Germany Peter Davis Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS Research Centre), University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Sharon Dawes Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany, Albany, New York, USA xi w.jager@rug.nl xii Contributors Zamira Dzhusupova Department of Public Administration and Development Management, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), NewYork, USA Bruce Edmonds Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK Theo Fens Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Marco Gavanelli University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy Lasse Gerrits Department of Public Administration, Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Erasmus University Nigel Gilbert University of Surrey, Guildford, UK Jozef Glova Technical University Kosice, Kosice, Slovakia Natalie Helbig Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany, Albany, New York, USA Paulier Herder Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Jeroen van den Hoven Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Wander Jager Groningen Center of Social Complexity Studies, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Marijn Janssen Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Geerten van de Kaa Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Eleni Kamateri Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research & Technology—Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece Bram Klievink Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Jörn Kohlhammer GRIS, TU Darmstadt & Fraunhofer IGD, Darmstadt, Germany Christopher Koliba University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA Michel Krämer Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research, Darmstadt, Germany Roy Lay-Yee Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS Research Centre), University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Deirdre Lee INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, NUIG, Galway, Ireland w.jager@rug.nl Contributors xiii Andreas Ligtvoet Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands Euripidis Loukis University of the Aegean, Samos, Greece Dragana Majstorovic University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany Michela Milano University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Simona Milio London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, UK Catherine Gerald Mkude Institute for IS Research, University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany Rebecca Moody Department of Public Administration, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Diego Navarra Studio Navarra, London, UK Adegboyega Ojo INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, NUIG, Galway, Ireland Eleni Panopoulou Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research & Technology—Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece Anastasia Papazafeiropoulou Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK David Price Thoughtgraph Ltd, Somerset, UK Erik Pruyt Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands; Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Wassenaar, The Netherlands Tobias Ruppert Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research, Darmstadt, Germany Efthimios Tambouris Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research & Technology—Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece; University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece Konstantinos Tarabanis Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research & Technology—Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece; University of Macedonia ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running Head: TECHNOLOGY ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

1

IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION ON
RENEWABLE ENERGY
By Name)
Course)
Professor
Institution Affiliation
Date

TECHNOLOGY ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

2

Meeting Demand for Energy Consumption Across the Globe
The consistent growth of the global economy depends greatly on reliable energy sources
to effectively run the world industries. Information technology has been an imperative and
crucial tool in providing quick access to evidence-based information, which helps in formulating
policies that can lead to renewable energy provision and hence improve the global economy.
Technology has also eased and reduced the cost of implementing various formulated policies on
renewable energy. Renewable energy is reliable, efficient and causes less pollution on the
environment, which makes it quite a sort-out form of energy. Blaabjerg & Chen (2003) affirms
that as a result of the increasing environmental co...

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