Wilkes Community College Searching for Competitors for Dart Drones Company Paper

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Wilkes Community College

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I’m studying for my Business class and don’t understand how to answer this. Can you help me study?

Do a search and talk about the competitors in CANDA for DartDrones company. DartDrones is an American Company.

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Private and Confidential. For X-Culture use only. Updated January 31, 2020 2020-1b Company: Dart Drones Country: USA Website: www.dartdrones.com Webinars: Webinar schedule and recordings here Questions: If you have further questions, please send them to Admin@X-Culture.org. Your questions will be directed to the company representatives. Company Description: Please see this Company Information Packet. 1 About DARTdrones DARTdrones is the leading nationwide drone training company in the United States offering courses in over 40 cities. We offer basic flight training classes, Part 107 Airman Knowledge test prep courses, advanced industry specific training, and UAS program implementation consulting services. We are also currently developing the DARTdrones PilotHub, a comprehensive continued education software platform offering micro-courses, resources, and customizable training paths for individuals and companies. DARTdrones has trained over 9,000 drone pilots to date from many of the nation’s largest companies and organizations. DARTdrones utilizes an expert curriculum instruction team as well as instructors with manned aviation backgrounds to maintain the brand of the highest quality enterprise drone training in the country. DARTdrones as Your Resource Vetted Expert Flight Instructors Our expert flight instructors are Part 61 manned aviation pilots who utilize UAS technology on a daily basis across a variety of industries. Handpicked from over 1000 applicants, our 40 instructors each specialize in vertical specific training and stand as subject matter experts to ensure the most up-to-date mission specific training and information. Mission Specific Training With hundreds of different drone use cases emerging, companies are realizing that Part 107 and basic flight training are not sufficient for safely conducting advanced commercial sUAS operations. DARTdrones utilizes the vast industry-specific experience of our expert flight instructors and curriculum developers to provide advanced training on courses such as Rapid Daytime Search and Rescue, Roof Inspections, Close Proximity Flight Inspections, Aerial Mapping and Modeling, Aerial Media, and dozens of other customized mission training modules. Focus On Enterprise DARTdrones has built an extensive training program designed with large enterprise teams in mind. Our new DARTdrones PilotHub is a custom software developed by DARTdrones for assisting managers with tracking their pilots as they progress through custom training programs. A Proven Model DARTdrones has facilitated over 11,000 hours of instructor-led training. Our operations, sales, and instructor teams have developed a proven and efficient model that works. With this model, DARTdrones is able to set an all-inclusive final price and easily bring partners into our process. National and International Coverage DARTdrones is the leading nationwide drone training company offering courses in over 40 cities across the United States. DARTdrones has also trained internationally. For an international client, we typically charge more for travel expenses, but keep to a relatively similar pricing model. We have also had an overwhelming amount of requests to franchise DARTdrones internationally and are looking into the opportunity. Consulting Drone Launch Program Our team of consultants assess and build customized UAS Integration Plans with a focus on organizational goals, use cases, regulations, insurance, software options, training requirements, equipment needs, budget, and timelines. Standard Operating Procedures Manual Our team of consultants build a Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) manual that is fully customized to the organization’s internal processes, use cases, and equipment. Waivers and Authorizations Our team of consultants evaluate the needs, submit the required paperwork, and manage the organization’s relationship with FAA on behalf of the organization. Program Manager Guide Our team of consultants develop a handbook for the sUAS program manager to utilize and understand how to work with their sUAS team. 2 DARTDRONES DARTdrones Project Team Our Instructors DARTdrones utilizes an expert team of 40 instructors who all bring manned aviation experience as well as real world experience flying sUAS for different use cases. From public safety to industrial inspections to professional videography, DARTdrones instructors bring unique real world experience to share with students. The DARTdrones Instructor team brings over 11,000 hours in drone training experience. 300+ Years of Aviation Experience Colin Romberger Chief Pilot and UAS Consultant Colin graduated from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University as one of the first 5 students to earn a Master’s Degree in Unmanned Aircraft Systems, with a focus in Flight Operations and Systems Design. Colin also holds multiple FAA Airman Certificates for manned aircraft operations. Colin was a sky diving instructor for multiple years with over 1500 recorded jumps. Amelia Owre Director of Training Amelia is a former Navy helicopter pilot and flew the SH-60F, HH-60H and MH-60S prior to transitioning to unmanned systems. She spent 5 years developing curriculum and implementing training for the Navy’s MQ-8 Fire Scout UAS, and continues to instruct UAS operators as a current Naval reservist. She is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds an M.S. in Environmental Science, a Commercial Pilot Certificate with fixed wing, helicopter and instrument ratings, and a Remote Pilot Certificate. Amelia focuses on developing new curriculum for DARTdrones and coordinating our subject matter experts. Jerry White Chief Media Instructor Jerry owns a video production company and has been in the business for more than 20 years. When he’s not shooting videos or flying sUAS, he flies as a contract pilot for different clients in Central Texas. He has 3,000 hours of flight time and has been a flight instructor, full-time corporate pilot, and an airline pilot. Karl Schwab Software and Systems Engineer Karl is a US Marine and computer programmer who worked for many different Department of Defense contractors including BAE Systems, Raytheon, United Defense, and has accrued over 27 years of Software and Systems Engineering experience working on Weapon/Turret, Command and Control, Embedded Missile and other various types of systems. He is a commercially licensed pilot in both Multi and Single-Engine Airplanes with over 1,300 hours of flight time and has an instrument rating. Mike Uleski Chief Public Safety Instructor Mike is an active Sergeant with a public safety department in Florida, where he is cross trained as a law enforcement officer, firefighter and EMT. He has a degree in Aeronautical Sciences from Embry-Riddle and a commercial pilot certificate with single-engine, multi-engine and instrument ratings. Alex Abatie sUAS Photographer & Design Director Alex has more than 20 years of experience as a photographer and design director. He is the owner of Hawkeye Workshop, an aerial photography company serving the film, real estate, and construction industries in Southern California. A long time remote control hobbyist, Alex holds both Sport Pilot and Remote Pilot certificates from the FAA. 3 DARTDRONES In-Person Training Basic Flight Training Our full day drone pilot training course will equip you with all of the knowledge and skills you need to become an expert drone pilot. The course offers a combination of classroom training and hands-on flight sessions. Part 107 Test Prep This course extensively reviews twelve major aviation topics covered in the FAA Part 107 Airman Knowledge test. Upon completion of the class, students are provided with additional supplemental material and practice tests to further their preparation for the exam. Aerial Roof Inspection Workshop This two-day intensive workshop focuses on the advanced sUAS flight maneuvers, image gathering techniques, and data analysis required to effectively carry out roof inspection operations. Seach and Rescue, Thermal & Night Operations In this two-day search and rescue drone training course, our expert public safety instructors provide hands-on experience in aerial search and rescue missions, thermal imaging, and night operations. Learn to successfully fly SAR missions. Broadcast Media Our two-day sUAS training courses teach journalists and media teams how to use an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle safely within FAA regulations. Develop the skills needed to use UAV technology safely and produce amazing stories. Close Proximity Flight This one day class gives remote pilots the hands-on skills that they need to fly missions that require flying close to structures such as public safety use-cases, inspections use cases, and photography and videography use cases. Aerial Mapping and Modeling ByOn-Site partnering with DroneDeploy, Private Training DARTdrones offers a two-day intensive workshop equipping students with the skills needed to safely and effectively gather, analyze, and export mapping data. AUVSI Trusted Operator Program Certifications DARTdrones is one of only three early adopters able to train and certify remote pilots for the AUVSI TOP Program. Courses would be taught depending on the level of certification desired. 4 DARTDRONES Online Training Starting a Drone Business This online course is a great way to get started and learn the ins and outs of running a new drone business including strategy development, targeting customers, business operations, legal considerations, and insurance options. Aerial Photography The Aerial Photography course is designed to introduce drone pilots to basic photography and videography skills. The class covers the rule of thirds, the Golden Hour, shot lists for clients, and basic editing. Part 107 Online This 8-hour online course reviews twelve major aviation topics covered in the FAA Part 107 Airman Knowledge test. Students are then provided with Part 107 practice tests to further their preparation for the exam. Disaster Response Learn how to be of assistance with your sUAS in a disaster or emergency while ensuring compliance with federal, state and local restrictions. This 5-hour, multi-section online course teaches you what you need to know to properly deploy your sUAS in the aftermath of a natural or man-made disaster. Drones For Beginners This one-hour course answers common questions posed by new sUAS pilots on topics such as types of drones, registering your drone, safety and regulation guidelines, industry trends and forecasts, and drone entrepreneurship. Real World Flight Planning & Execution Program These 11 Micro Courses consist of 8 hours of content that are scenario-based e-learning courses that take you through interactive sUAS flight issues and emergency scenarios to get you ready for real-world missions. Night Operations With decreased visibility and equipment limitations, sUAS night operations take special preparation and execution. Get ready to fly your drone at night with this interactive, online learning program. 5 DARTDRONES Testimonials “Once again Colin knocked it out of the park. His knowledge and professionalism exemplifies his passion to teach new pilots key and important issues concerns and updates about the drone Industry” “The class was jam packed and interactive which helped to understand Part 107 for those of us that are new to the aviation world. The flight class was invaluable for me! I have never even touched a drone prior to the class and left with some confidence that I can fly either the Phantom or Inspire without destroying my investment in equipment on the first flight.” “Excellent courses. The instructor made things interesting and informative for both the novice and experienced pilot. No matter your level of experience flying drones, you will take away valuable knowledge and skills.” “Team thought Mark was great. Super informative. Worked really well with the limited time we had. Mark did a great job of identifying the important information not only needed for the test, but for practical flying. Prep material and study guide are amazing. Highly recommended using you and DARTdrones.” “I absolutely loved my two day course with DARTdrones! I was excited before I got there but got even more excited about flying drones commercially after attending class! Karl was an exceptional instructor and made the class fun as well as informative!” “The instructor was great! He used his real world experiences in the field to tie in the industry material. I would highly suggest this training to anyone looking to gain knowledge in the sUAS field.” 137 DARTDRONES ABOUT DARTDRONES • Leading in-person drone training company in U.S. • Over 14,000+ students trained • 38 flight instructors covering 42 cities • 99% pass rate on Part 107 exam • Built to scale national sUAS pilot programs OUR CLIENTS • Broadcast Media • Police Departments • Inspections • Fire Departments • Real Estate • Construction • Insurance • Oil, Gas, Energy • Architecture/Engineering • Large Government • Colleges Organizations COURSE OFFERINGS Entry Level In-Person Advanced In-Person Online Courses • Flight Training • Thermal Imaging and FLIR • Drones For Beginners • Part 107 Test Prep • Roof Inspections • Part 107 Test Prep • Aerial Mapping • Starting a Drone • Search and Rescue • Aerial Photography and Videography • Broadcast Media • Night Operations • Matrice Business • Aerial Photography • 14 Micro Courses: Real World Flight Planning and Execution • Disaster Response CONSULTING SERVICES • Program Strategy Development • Proof of Concept • Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manuals • UAS Program Manager Guide • FAA Waiver Submissions • Pilot Training Management Software DARTDRONES DIRECTOR OF TRAINING Amelia Owre is a former Navy helicopter pilot and flew the SH-60F, HH-60H and MH-60S prior to transitioning to unmanned systems. She spent 5 years developing curriculum and implementing training for the Navy’s MQ-8 Fire Scout UAS, and continues to instruct UAS operators as a current Naval reservist. She is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds an M.S. in Environmental Science, a Commercial Pilot Certificate with fixed wing, helicopter and instrument ratings, and a Remote Pilot Certificate. Amelia focuses on developing new curriculum for DARTdrones and coordinating our subject matter experts. DARTDRONES CHIEF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR Colin Romberger graduated from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University as one of the first 5 students to earn their Master’s Degree in Unmanned Aircraft Systems, with a focus in Flight Operations and Systems Design. Colin also holds multiple FAA Airman Certificates for manned aircraft operations. Colin is responsible for ongoing instructor development initiatives as well as the coordination of sUAS Operations Consultation Services tailored to the specific use cases and operating environments of our corporate clients. He has consulted with numerous companies and organizations on their use of sUAS for a cross section of purposes. OUR FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS • All DARTdrones instructors are manned pilots • Hundreds of manned pilots applied, only 38 chosen • Flight instructors selected based on expertise, aviation experience, and personality • Current instructors are continuously vetted based on customer feedback DARTDRONES INTERNATIONAL • Growth restricted by regulations today in U.S. • Franchise or licensing internationally THE CHALLENGE DARTdrones has been working hard to grow our U.S. operations, but because of regulations and slow adoption of drones by companies, we are hoping to explore growth opportunities internationally. Specifically, we are exploring whether licensing our curriculum or franchising our business would make sense. We look forward to your help in exploring these two opportunities. Please present your results in a report that details the following: Section I: Industry/Market Analysis 1. Industry and Competition Analysis To provide a foundation for your analysis, start with a survey of the industry. How does this industry operate? What kind of regulations are in place? Who are your client’s main competitors? How your client’s product and pricing are different from those of the competitors? What are your client’s strengths and weaknesses compared to the competition, and what threats and opportunities it is facing? When assessing your client’s competitive position, you may find this short guide and this 5-min video on SWOT analysis helpful. 2. New Market Selection and Analysis Based on your analysis of the client and competition, identify the most promising new market for your client. Where the regulations are most favorable and the drones are used most widely? Where drone pilot training is likely to be in demand? Conduct an analysis of the market in terms of: • Regulations in currently in place and the expected changes in regulations. • Key competitors in the proposed market, their strengths, and weaknesses, their pricing and promotion strategies, etc. • Provide an in-depth analysis of the factors relevant to the success of your client in the market, including: o Legal, political, economic, and cultural factors that your client must understand to ensure the success in that market; o Consumer tastes and preferences with respect to your client’s product. Evaluation Rubrics 7 - Clear and concise list of the client’s strengths and weaknesses, threats and opportunities for its product, review of the market selection criteria, the recommended new market clearly matches the criteria, brief but insightful market analysis, strong supporting arguments, sources properly cited; if a survey of potential clients has been conducted, the sample is clearly described and the findings are presented in a concise readable format. 4 – A good analysis and recommendation, but some elements are not strongly supported, some parts are irrelevant or redundant. 1 - Impossible to figure out what the recommendation is, supporting arguments are absent or completely off the point, not supported by credible sources. 2 Section II. Marketing 3. Promotion Channels B2C Identify who makes the decisions to enroll in a drone pilot training program. Are those the end-users, or the chiefs of the departments (e.g., police department, firefighter department, media agency)? What is the best way to reach these decision-makers to inform them about the Dart Drones training programs? B2B Keep in mind that Dart Drones does not seek to sell its services directly to the end users, but rather to find local partners, such as franchisees, licensees, joint venture partners, or local partner agencies who would use the company’s training materials and offer the services in the market. Thus, while Dart Drones is ultimately intersted in developing a strategy for reaching the end-users, its primary interest is reaching local businesses interested in representing Dart Drones in the proposed new market. Thus, the questions to answer are: Who can potentially be an effective local representative and partner of Dart Drones? If these are companies, who at those companies makes those kinds of decisions? What is the best way to reach those decision-makers? Because it will likely be a highly specialized consumer segment, mass advertising like TV may not be an optimal promotion method. Rather, professional mailing lists, direct mailing, highly targeted promotion via social media and professional associations, or personal meetings with target organizations representatives may be more viable and cost-effective, although more common methods may be more suitable for reaching parents. Try to not only identify the general channels, but also research and provide the specifics. For example, do not simply recommend professional email distribution lists, targeted social media campaigns, or professional associations as a way to reach the decision-makers (such as LinkedIn network, etc.). Find out the actual email distribution lists and research how one can send out a promotional message to its recipients; suggest which social media allow for sending information directly to the decision-makers and how exactly this could be done; or which professional associations or conferences the decision-makers belong or go to. That is, provide names, addresses, prices, and exact steps that need to be taken to send out the message via this channel. 4. Message • • • • • What is the best way to convince consumers to buy the product? What is the best way to convince the potential local partners to work with Dart Drones? What should be the main message of the marketing campaign and how should it be presented? What are the best message, slogan, and other marketing campaign elements? If applicable, discuss if the brand name or its presentation should be modified to make the product more appealing to the tastes and traditions of the consumers in the new market. 5. Promotional Materials To interest potential customers and local representatives, your client will need to present information about its training programs. Illustrate your knowledge of the target consumers in your chosen new market by developing a mock-up locally-tailored marketing brochure, email or webpage template, or social media post that your client can use to promote the product. It does not need to have the perfect graphic design. It should only serve as a concept sketch for what the promo material should look like to be effective with the target market segment. 3 Evaluation Rubrics 7 – The recommended promotion channel(s) is inexpensive and allows to precisely target the potential customers, there is a clear step-by-step guide for how to place an ad there and how much it will cost, an appealing and convincing marketing brochure with strong supporting arguments for each element. 4 – Good suggestions, but not enough detail and weak supporting arguments, some parts are irrelevant or redundant, the formatting is inconsistent. 1 - Impossible to figure out what the recommendation is, supporting arguments are absent or completely off the point, not supported by credible sources. Section III. Operations Management 6. Entry Mode • What is the mode of doing business in the proposed market? • Are direct sales of the training online the optimal market entry mode, or franchising, licensing, a whollyowned subsidiary, or a partnership with the local government agencies would be more effective? • If a partnership with a local partner, school, or agency is advised, what organizations would be the best candidates for such partnership (list at least three, with contacts, descriptions, and tips for how to approach them)? 7. Pricing Strategy What is the optimal way to charge for the training programs like those offered by Dart Drones? Should it be a fixed price per course, or a different model would fit better with the regulations and culture of the new market and would ensure higher market penetration (subscription, membership, group pricing, repeat customer discounts, installment payments, etc.), and corresponds well with the marketing strategy suggested earlier? This blog and this article offer a good overview of some of the available pricing strategy options. Evaluation Rubrics 7 – The proposed program design improvements are compelling and well-argued; the proposed pricing strategy is effective and clearly explained. Novel solutions are used to make the program and its pricing attractive to potential applicants, without compromising our ability to deliver the program and cover our operating costs. 4 – Good suggestions, but not enough detail and weak supporting arguments, some parts are irrelevant or redundant, the formatting is inconsistent 1 - Impossible to figure out what the recommendation is, supporting arguments are absent or completely off the point, not supported by credible sources. 4 REPORT STRUCTURE AND FORMATTING Report structure: • Title Page must contain o team number o client company name o names, emails, and countries of residence of all the team members and a short summary (5-15 words) of the role and work completed by each team member. o If any of the team members dropped out or did not contribute to the report, please still list them, but add a note “Did not participate” by their names. • Executive Summary (300-400 words, bullet-list format preferred) that provides a short review of your key findings and recommendations. The Executive Summary should not be saying what the report will be about (list of topics), but rather summarize your key recommendations (the proposed new market, key findings of the industry analysis, key features of the recommended marketing and pricing strategies, etc.). By reading the Executive Summary, your client should be able to see and understand right away your key recommendations. The rest of the report should only provide more details and supporting arguments. • Report sections corresponding to each question listed above. Start each report section with short bullet-list summary of the key recommendations presented in the section (2-4 bullets, each 4-10 words long), followed by 2-5 pages of more detailed explanations and supporting arguments. • References: if you cite any sources in the text of the report, provide full references in this section. Please use APA-6 citation style (google how to cite sources using APA-6 if you are not sure). • Appendixes: If needed, add additional information in appendices, within the page limit. Formatting: • The report must be 15-25 single-spaced pages (7,000-15,000 words) including the title page, executive summary, references, and appendices. Each section should be 1-4 pages long. Generally shorter is better, so be as concise and focused as possible. Design your report for easy navigation and scanning for key ideas. • Number all pages in your team report. • Portrait page orientation. • Margins should be 2.5 cm (one inch) at the top, bottom, and sides of the page. • Font type should be 12-point Times New Roman throughout the report. • Single-space all body text. • Indent the first line of a new paragraph. • The text should be left aligned. • All citations used must be cited in the text and in a reference list at the end of each report. In-text citations should include only the name of the author(s) and the date of the publication. Full references should be provided at the end of the report. Please use APA reference style. • A picture is worth a thousand of words, so use of figures, graphs, pictures, as well as tables is encouraged. It is recommended these are included in the main body of the report. • Know your client: Which English spelling dictionary and paper size (A4/US Letter) varies based on which country your client’s business is headquartered. 5 Note About Presenting Academic Frameworks to Business Executives: Academic frameworks (e.g. SWOT, PESTLE, Porter 5 Forces, etc) are excellent for populating data and facilitating analysis. They demonstrate a more rigorous thinking process rather than just ad hoc anecdotal opinions. However, it is the insights drawn from such academic frameworks that is of interest to business executives. Just populating an academic framework and placing it in the body of a report without highlighting the insight gained adds little value for the business executive. The eyes of a busy business executive will skip over a busy populated academic framework as discrete descriptors within the framework mean little – it is the relationships and insights that you highlight that is valuable to a business executive (do not have the reader guessing what you thought was important in the chart – tell them). The best reports discuss the insights within the body of the report, perhaps supported by a simple chart, referencing the academic framework in the appendix. Diagrams, charts, summarised tables, etc. certainly are fine within the body of the report, but there should be an easy to deceiver message from such graphics. Download a PDF of a report from McKinsey Quarterly (www.mckinseyquarterly.com) to obtain an illustration of one approach. Evaluation of the Executive Summary 7 - Short but gives a very good idea about the key ideas presented in the business proposal, the Client can get a good idea about the main points of the proposed strategy from the executive summary; 4 - Gives some idea about the key suggestions, but some points remain uncertain; a bit too long; not to the point. 1 - Not possible to figure out the key ideas of the business proposal from the summary, too short or too long Evaluation of the Formatting 7 – The report has a clear structure, visual appeal, the sections are consistently formatted, sources are properly cited, the formatting guidelines are followed exactly with respect to the page limit, font and other requirements. 4 – The formatting guidelines are generally followed, but there are some deviations, there are some signs of sloppiness in document formatting. 1 – The document looks very unprofessional, different report sections are formatted differently, the document is very hard to read and navigate. 6 TASKS AND DEADLINES Each week, you will be asked to fill out a short survey to report your team’s progress, evaluate the performance of your team members and provide other information we need to understand better why some teams perform better than others. Please see the informed consent form at the end of this document for more details. Important: Participants who receive peer evaluations below 2.0 (out of 5.0) will first receive a warning. If their peer evaluations stay below 2.0 two weeks in a row, they will be automatically excluded from the team. Important: Occasionally emails with invitations to take a survey are filtered into the Junk/Spam email folder. Please check your Junk/Spam email folder (search for messages with “X-Culture” in the subject line) if you don’t receive a survey invitation message around the date specified in the table above. All deadlines are set for 11:59 pm (23:59), EST time zone (New York). 1. Pre-project Readiness Test Due: Any time before the official project start Before the project starts, all participants must review project materials and take a Readiness Test. The test will include questions about the project and online collaboration tools, as well as questions about your prior international experience and background. You must successfully pass the Readiness Test (80% or more correct answers) to participate in X-Culture. If your semester starts after the official start of the project or you do not complete the Readiness Test on time for another reason, do so as soon as you can – we will continue adding new participants for about ten days after the project start. Official Project Start, Teams Formed Monday, March 2 As long as you completed the Readiness Test, you will receive the names and contact information of your team members on this day. Please reach out to your teammates immediately to establish contact. Introduce yourself, and start working on the project. Students whose semester starts later will be added to the existing teams once their semester starts, so it is likely an additional student may be added to your team in the first two weeks. 2. Establish Contact with Your Teammates Due: Thursday, March 5 By this date, you are expected to have exchanged at least a few messages with your teammates. If some teammates are not responding, you are expected to send at least three email reminders to them by this date. Team members who fail to establish contact with their teams will be excluded from the project. Your communication starts via email, but once the initial contact is established, your team can use any means of communication. Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will ask you to report whether or not you have communicated with all of your team members. Team members who fail to establish contact with their teams may be removed from the project. Note: This and all other weekly surveys will also ask to evaluate your team members’ performance and provide additional information we need to understand better why some teams perform better than others. Please see the informed consent form at the end of this document for more details. 7 3. Meet Your Teammates Due: Sunday, March 8 Meet your team members: Please learn as much as possible about your teammates (background, interests, hobbies, experiences, etc.). Research shows that spending a little time getting to know team members greatly improves team effectiveness. It is also strongly recommended that you try a live video call (e.g., Skype). Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will test how well you got to know your team members. It will contain a few questions about your team members, such as their background, interests, etc. The acquaintanceship test will not be graded, so do not feel obliged to reveal any personal information to your team members or insist that your team members reveal their personal information to you. However, try to get to know your teammates as much as you can. 4. Select the Client Company, Team Charter Due: Sunday, March 15 By this date, your team is expected to review all available challenges and select your client organization. Before you choose your client organization, please carefully review the challenges presented by each organization and try to attend (or watch the recordings of) the webinars with each of the client companies, which will be held in the first week of the project. Team Charter: Discuss with your team members and collectively write a one-page Team Charter that details how your team will operate. It is recommended that the Team Charter includes the following sections: • Distribution of roles and tasks. Many teams divide the workload by the report section. Research shows teams perform better when they divide the workload by function: one person is tasked with coordinating team efforts, checking everyone’s progress, sending reminders, redistributing tasks if needed; another person, usually a native English speaker, serves as a copyeditor, and so on. Many teams also select a person whose role is to question everything and force the team to weigh their options more carefully. Some teams assign a person whose job is to make sure nobody is ignored. Some people are shy or may have a hard time keeping up the pace, and it is important they are not left behind and their opinions are voiced and given full consideration. • Dealing with conflicts. How conflicts (interpersonal, task, process) will be resolved. • Dealing with free-riders. In most teams, someone is always late, produces low-quality work, or underperforms otherwise. Sometimes, a team member stops working altogether (gets sick, busy at work, family problems, or simply drops the course). How will the team deal with the loss of a team member? Who will redo the work if needed? Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will ask you to report the name of your client organization, as well as ask each team member to submit the same copy of the Team Charter. 5. Initial Individual Research and Ideas Due: Sunday, March 22 Conduct your initial research and try to learn as much as possible about the industry your client operates in: Who are the main players? What the most popular products and technologies? What new technologies and approaches are likely to dominate the industry in the future? Is the industry regulated by the government and how? What are the differences in different regions of the world? How does your client compare to the competitors? What are your client’s strengths and weaknesses? Try to interview 2-3 potential customers of your client company to better understand how they make purchasing decisions and if (and why) they would 8 choose your client over the completion. Review the challenge questions listed in the three sections earlier and, based on your initial research, jot down your personal initial answers to each of them. You do not have to write more than a few words in response to each question at this point; just your initial ideas and possible answers. This will prepare you for the team discussions when your team will be collectively developing the best answers to each question. Even if your team decides to assign a different report section to different team members, it is very important that each team member shares his/her suggestions for each question. This will give the team member responsible for the report section more to work with and help develop better final answers. Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The weekly survey will ask you to report the results of your initial individual research and your initial individual suggestions for responding to each block of questions listed earlier. Specifically, you will be asked to: • Report the results of your industry analysis, including a brief description of the industry, your client’s strengths and weaknesses compared to the completion, etc. (bullet list of key findings, half a page total) • Your initial recommendations for the most promising market, market entry mode, key elements of the promotion and marketing strategy, and key elements of the operation strategy (1-2 points in response to each question, a paragraph per question). 6. Block 1: Market Analysis Due: Sunday, March 29 This week, your team is expected to submit a draft of your Section 1. It does not have to be a fully finished report section. However, try to complete as much as possible. The more you complete now, the less work your team will have to do later. The drafts will not be graded by X-Culture and will not affect your chances of winning the completion (we only evaluate the final reports). However, the instructors will have access to these documents in case they would like to review your work and provide feedback. Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will ask you to submit a draft of your Report Section 1 (the survey will contain a document upload link). Although your team is expected to develop the section draft collectively, only one team member will be asked to upload the document on behalf of the team. However, every team member will be asked to complete the rest of the progress survey (questions about how your team is doing and peer evaluations). 7. Block 2: Marketing Due: Sunday, April 5 This week, your team is expected to submit a draft of your Section 2. It does not have to be a fully finished report section. However, try to complete as much as possible. The more you complete now, the less work your team will have to do later. The drafts will not be graded by X-Culture and will not affect your chances of winning the completion (we only evaluate the final reports). However, the instructors will have access to these documents in case they would like to review your work and provide feedback. Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will ask you to submit a draft of your Report Section 2 (the survey will contain a document upload link). Although your team is expected to develop the section draft collectively, only one team member will be asked to upload the document on behalf of the team. However, every team member will be asked to complete the rest of the progress survey (questions about how your team is doing and peer evaluations). 9 8. Block 3: Operations Management Due: Sunday, April 12 This week, your team is expected to submit a draft of your Section 3. It does not have to be a fully finished report section. However, try to complete as much as possible. The more you complete now, the less work your team will have to do later. The drafts will not be graded by X-Culture and will not affect your chances of winning the completion (we only evaluate the final reports). However, the instructors will have access to these documents in case they would like to review your work and provide feedback. Deliverables: A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with your personal weekly survey link. The survey will ask you to submit a draft of your Report Section 3 (the survey will contain a document upload link). Although your team is expected to develop the section draft collectively, only one team member will be asked to upload the document on behalf of the team. However, every team member will be asked to complete the rest of the progress survey (questions about how your team is doing and peer evaluations). 9. Complete Draft Due: Sunday, Due: Sunday, April 19 By this date, your team is expected to have a complete draft of your report. It does not have to be a finished report, but it should be as complete as possible, including Title Page and an Executive and Chapter Summaries, and correct formatting throughout the document. Deliverables: One team member should submit the draft via TurnItIn.com on behalf of the entire team (see step-by-step submission guidelines below). After your document is submitted, TurnItIn will generate a plagiarism report that will show you if any parts of the report have been plagiarized (takes several hours to produce). Usually, up to 20% similarity is acceptable, provided that copy-and-pasted materials are properly referenced. If plagiarism is detected, your team will have until the Final Report deadline (see below) to fix the problem and submit a plagiarism-free final report. This draft will not be graded and the plagiarism statistics will not be shared with your instructors. This is only for your information. You should continue editing the report until the final deadline, and you can still make any changes or additions. However, it is strongly encouraged that you submit as complete a document as possible, You will be able to submit your draft and check it for plagiarism only once, so the more complete the draft, the less the chance that the final report will contain plagiarism. Also, every team member will be asked to submit your usual weekly progress survey. A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email with the usual questions about your team. 10. Final Report Due: Friday, Due: Sunday, April 24 By this date, your final report must be submitted via TurnItIn.com (see Submission Guidelines below). Please note, the plagiarism statistics for final reports will be generated by TurnItIn and shared with the instructors, but the plagiarism report will not be shared with the students. Only one team member must submit the final document via TurnItIn.com on behalf of the team. 10 11. Post-Project Survey Due once report submitted, but no later than Sunday, Due: Sunday, April 26 A few days before the deadline, you will receive an email invitation with a link to your post-project survey. This is the most important survey. The survey will ask about your experiences in X-Culture and evaluate the performance of your teammates. Your answers are extremely important and will help us improve the project in the future. Every team member must complete the survey. Submission Guidelines The report draft and the final report documents must be submitted via www.TurnItIn.com. Only one team member must submit the documents on behalf of the entire team. The team member who will be submitting the draft and final report must follow these steps: Part 1. Create a TurnItIn account (time required: 60-90 seconds). 1. On www.turnitin.com and click on the link “Create Account”. 2. On the next window, under the “Create a New Account” heading, click on the “Student” link. 3. Enter the Class ID. Note the Draft and Final report submissions have different Class IDs: Class ID: 23500622 (password xculture) Note: If you already have a TurnItIn account, log on using your “old” login information, click on the “Enroll in Class” tab on the top, and repeat step 3. Part 2: Submitting the paper (time required: 60-120 seconds) 4. Once the account is created, you can log into your account. Your home page will list your classes. 5. Select the correct class and click on the "Submit" button. Make sure to select “Draft” assignment for the report draft and “Final Report” for the final report. 6. Choose Single File Upload. Make certain the file name only contains your team number. Wrong: “Final report 123.pdf”, “Team Report.pdf”, “Team 123.pdf”, “John Smith.pdf” Right: “123.pdf” 7. Click on "browse" to locate the paper saved to your computer. 8. Click on the file and click "open". 9. Click the "upload" button at the bottom. 10. Click "submit" to confirm your submission. Once the submission is finalized, you will see “Your submission was successful” on the top of the page. If you wait a few hours, you will see your “originality report” that shows how much and what parts of your report have been plagiarized. research will have no effect on your course grade. 11 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • "Doing Business - Measuring Business Regulations - World Bank Group". Doing Business. 30 December 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2013. "COUNTRY COMPARISON :: STOCK OF DIRECT FOREIGN INVESTMENT - AT HOME". Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved 20 August 2018. By David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy; New York Times, The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest; April 22, 2014 World Value Survey http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/WVSOnline.jsp McIntosh, Matt. “Sprayer Drones Making Headway in Canada.” Future Farming, 3 Dec. 2019, www.futurefarming.com/Machinery/Articles/2019/12/Sprayer-drones-makingheadway-in-Canada-508034E/. “Why Some Search and Rescue Groups Steer Clear of Drones | CBC News.” CBCnews, CBC/Radio Canada, 11 May 2019, www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/dronessearch-and-rescue-technology-paramedics-transport-canada-1.5127613. https://www.searchenginejournal.com/2020-social-media-trends/342851/#close Banco Santander, SA (2018) Canada: legal environment, available at https://santandertrade.com/en/portal/establish-overseas/canada/legalenvironment (accessed 27th March, 2020) Howandwhat (2018) PESTEL analysis of Canada, available at https://www.howandwhat.net/pestel-analysis-canada (accessed 27th March, 2020) Area development (2011) legal requirements for doing business in Canada, available at https://www.areadevelopment.com/canada-investment-guide/locationcanada2011/canadalegal-requirements-doing-business007885.shtml DartDrones. (2020, January 31). Dart Drones. Culture, 1-. Girard, L. (2013, June 24). 10 Questions to Ask When Pricing Your Product. Retrieved from Entrepreneur: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227083 Kolenda, N. (n.d.). Pricing Psychology. Psychology and Marketing. Retrieved from https://www.nickkolenda.com/psychological-pricing-strategies/ "Aerial Photography & Drone Services In Canada | Uaviation". 2020. Uaviation. https://www.uaviation.ca/services/. "Dartdrones - About Our Company And Flight Instructors". 2020. Dartdrones. https://www.dartdrones.com/about-us/. "Our Services – Canadian Uavs". 2020. Canadianuavs.Com. https://canadianuavs.com/ourservices/. "Services - Drone Delivery Canada". 2020. Drone Delivery Canada. https://dronedeliverycanada.com/services/. "Services | Aeromao". 2020. Aeromao.Com. https://www.aeromao.com/services/.
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Running head: COMPETITOR ANALYSIS FOR DARTDRONES

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COMPETITOR ANALYSIS FOR DARTDRONES

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DARTdrones is a United States-based company that provides extensive training, as well
as consulting activities to individual persons, enterprises, or even organizations. It has
headquarters located in Park City, Utah. The company has recorded revenue of $2.5 million
while it has employed approximately 70 employees. Its direct competitors in the United States
are Kespry, precisionHawk, and DroneDeploy ("Dartdrones - About Our Company An...

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Duke University

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