Forensic Research Paper, science homework help

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I need a forensic science research paper, all its requirements are attached separately on the attached documents. It's up to you to choose the topic, fill out and complete the following documents


- choosing a topic

- write final draft here research paper


for references and more info on what has to be written check out all the other documents that include the rubric, model research paper, timeline, etc.



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Science I Graded Assignment I Choosing a Topic Name: Date: Graded Assignment Choosing a Topic Review the activities about finding a topic for your project and choose one for your research paper (unless your teacher has assigned a topic to you). Narrow down your topic by answering the Narrowing a Research Topic questions in the Student Guide. Remember: Your paper will be 3–5 double-spaced pages, or approximately 900– 1,500 words. When you think you have arrived at a level that is specific enough to make a workable topic, submit the assignment by the due date for full credit and for feedback from your teacher. (10 points) 1. What topic have you chosen for your research paper? Why did you choose this topic? List the questions you plan to address, as well as any other information you plan to include. Score Answer: Your Score © 2013 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. ___ of 10 Page 1 of 1 Science | Grading Rubric | Research Paper Grading Rubric Research Paper Your teacher will use this grading rubric to evaluate your project. Criteria Communicates that a specific topic is being researched. 13 Points The main idea is communicated clearly and in an interesting manner. The student  Presents the topic with organization and coherence. 10 Points  Demonstrates am sophisticated understanding of the main idea.   Recognizes the complexity of the thesis.  Recognizes some  contradictions and follows through to logical implications.  Understands and defines all terms. The paper is well structured. Transitions allow ideas to flow logically from one to the next. The reader is guided through a clear progression of ideas. © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. The main idea is communicated clearly. The student Demonstrates a somewhat sophisticated understanding of the main idea. Recognizes the complexity of the thesis as well as one or two contradictions. Understands and defines most terms. The paper demonstrates a clear structure. The reader is guided through a clear progression of ideas. 7 Points 3 Points The main idea is communicated with some clarity. The student The main idea is communicated in a confusing manner. The student     Demonstrates a basic understanding of the main idea. Recognizes the complexity of the thesis. Understands and defines a few terms. The paper demonstrates structure. The progression of ideas is organized somewhat.   The main idea is neither understood nor communicated by the student. Demonstrates less than a basic understanding of the main idea. Does not recognize the complexity of the thesis. Does not understand or define terms. The paper demonstrates very little structure. The progression of ideas is somewhat confusing. Page 1 of 2 0 Points The paper demonstrates no structure. The progression of ideas is confusing. Science | Grading Rubric | Research Paper Criteria 13 Points 10 Points 7 Points Supports the main idea and thesis. Evidence is used correctly and effectively. Sufficient support and explanation engage the reader. Evidence is used correctly. Clear support and explanation engage the reader. Some evidence is used correctly and some evidence is either weak or possibly inaccurate. Some evidence engages the reader. Very little evidence is used correctly. Some evidence is factually inaccurate. Very little evidence engages the reader. Very little or no evidence is used correctly. Most or all evidence is factually inaccurate. No evidence engages the reader. Employs an appropriate style of writing. Sentence style: Sentence style: Sentence style: Sentence style: Sentence style:       Fits the purpose of the paper. Demonstrates focus and structure.  Fits the purpose of the paper. Mostly demonstrate focus and structure.  3 Points Somewhat fits the purpose of the paper. Demonstrates some focus and structure.  Very little fits the purpose of the paper. Demonstrates only a little focus and structure. 0 Points  Does not fit the purpose of the paper. Demonstrates no focus and no structure. Applies proper mechanics of writing. Footnotes and bibliography are correct and effective Most footnotes and bibliography entries are correct More than half of the footnotes and bibliography entries are correct Less than half of the footnotes and bibliography entries are correct There are no footnotes or bibliography Utilizes proper citation and sourcing. Footnotes and bibliography are correct and effective Most footnotes and bibliography entries are correct More than half of the footnotes and bibliography entries are correct Less than half of the footnotes and bibliography entries are correct There are no footnotes or bibliography © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 2 of 2 Science | Model Research Paper| Animal Life of the Antarctic Model Research Paper Animal Life of the Antarctic Most people probably think of Antarctica as a barren, lifeless waste. They see endless plains of ice and snow, a frozen land without life. However, Antarctica is home to a number of animals that have learned to adapt to the cold. These animals include several varieties of microscopic creatures that cannot be seen with the naked eye. They also include more familiar birds, fish, and sea mammals. The adaptations of Antarctic animals make them fascinating to scientists and ordinary people alike. Antarctica’s native animals include mites, lice, midges, springtails, and fleas. Mites are the most common, and the 12-millimeter wingless midge is the largest native animal. These species have a hard time surviving the cold. The mites and springtails live under rocks. They have developed a process called supercooling to help them survive in the polar climate. Through supercooling, the mites’ body fluids are kept at a temperature that would normally be below the freezing point. Their bodies can make glycerol, which is a natural antifreeze. However, ice can form around the food in the mite’s digestive system, so the mite cannot eat very much or it will freeze. On the other hand, if it does not eat, it will starve. Therefore, the mite must balance its body processes between those two alternatives (Strebel, Merki, and Man). In contrast to its lack of land mammals, Antarctica's bird life is plentiful. Antarctica is perhaps best known for its large colonies of penguins. Penguins are flightless birds that dive into the sea to fish. Black and white in color, they are swift, graceful swimmers, but on land they walk with a waddle. Penguins are able to live in the Antarctic because of three adaptations that keep them warm and dry. First, they have thick, waterproof coats made of oil-tipped feathers that overlap to make a protective layer. Underneath that, they have a thick layer of down to insulate them against the cold. Below the down they have a layer of fat that also keeps them warm. The penguins of the Antarctic live on the land some of the time and swim in the water the rest of the time. They eat krill, a small, shrimplike sea creature, as well as fish and squid. They come on land to breed during the summer. The emperor penguin and the Adélie penguin make their homes on the Antarctic coastline. They are the only two species of penguin that do so. Five other species of penguins live on the Antarctic Peninsula and the islands near Antarctica. The five species are the chinstrap, gentoo, king, macaroni, and rockhopper. Emperor penguins have captured the fancy of people through movies. At three to four feet tall, they are the largest penguin, and thus they are called the emperor. The king penguin is slightly smaller, at about three feet tall. More than a million emperor penguins live in Antarctica (“Antarctica”). They live in large colonies that may contain up to 20,000 pairs of male and female penguins (Smith 126). They have become famous for their amazing way of incubating their chicks. The male incubates the egg, a role that is very unusual in the animal kingdom. The female lays her egg during the winter. She can only lay one at a time because the incubation method is so difficult. Soon after the egg-laying, the male penguin wobbles over to the egg, balances it on its feet, and covers it with a special flap of skin called a brood patch. Under the brood patch, the incubating egg stays snug and warm. Then the father penguin stays there and incubates the egg until summer. He does not eat and drinks only melted snow. He loses 40% of his body weight during this challenging period (Strebel, Merki, and Man). To reduce their heat loss, the male penguins huddle together like a large group of huddling football players. The penguins in the center of the huddle are the warmest, so the penguins take turns in that position. "While the males are incubating the eggs, the females travel to the sea in order to feed. They return in the summer when the chicks are ready to hatch. Each mother penguin must recognize her partner’s call from among thousands of penguins that are gathered together in a colony, each one calling to its mate. As the females recognize the call, they rejoin their partners and begin taking care of the chicks. After that happens, the males are free to travel two days across the ice to the sea, where they have their first meal in months. In addition to penguins, Antarctica is home to a number of seabirds that can fly. The seabirds of the Antarctic include the albatross, the bird with the largest wingspan of any living bird. Albatrosses breed on the © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 1 of 2 Science | Model Research Paper| Animal Life of the Antarctic islands near Antarctica, such as South Georgia Island, and the breeding season is the only time when they touch land. Other seabirds of the Antarctic include cormorants, gulls, petrels, pipits, sheathbills, and terns. They eat mollusks, fish, squid, and crustaceans; some also eat eggs and penguin chicks. The birds of Antarctica are excellent navigators with their own built-in navigation systems and biological clocks. Scientists have released Adélie penguins 1,900 miles from their nests, and the penguins have found their way back (“Antarctica”). Not only do the Antarctic waters provide a feeding ground for birds, but they also provide a fulltime home for fish and sea mammals. About 100 species of fish live in the Antarctic waters, and about 90 of them live on the sea bottom (“Antarctica”). Many of them are found nowhere else in the world, and they have made special adaptations to the cold. For example, the Antarctic ice fish, like the mite and springtail, uses a supercooling method. Its blood contains a natural antifreeze. According to author Miranda Smith, the blood of this type of fish is “almost translucent” (128). Antarctic sea mammals include seals, porpoises, dolphins, and whales. Seven of those types of whales are baleen whales, which do not have teeth; instead they filter water through a huge sheet of material called whalebone, or baleen, that hangs down from their upper jaws. The whalebone traps tiny creatures such as krill that provide the whale with food. Blue whales, which are the world’s largest animals, filter huge amounts of water through their baleen every day. They need to eat almost a ton of krill to make a full meal (Smith 183). The whales of the Antarctic also include toothed whales such as the sperm whale and the killer whale, or orca. Toothed whales hunt prey. Orcas hunt in packs, and because of their former name “killer whales,” they may sound frightening, but in fact they do not attack humans. In addition, scientists have recently discovered a strange environment underneath the polar ice sheets. It is a series of lakes and rivers under the thick ice sheets. These bodies of liquid water can exist under the ice because the ice acts like a huge down blanket that keeps the water warm near the bottom. Scientists learned about this unexpected living environment when the Larsen ice sheet collapsed in 1995 and in 2002 (Brahic). The breaking of the ice sheet alarmed many people in the world who saw it as a sign of global warming. However, the event delighted marine biologists, who traveled to the region to explore parts of the ocean floor that had been sealed off for 5,000 to 12,000 years (Brahic). One scientist, Michael Studinger, has said, “This is essentially a whole new world that ten years ago we didn’t know existed” (Dell’Amore). This wetland under the ice has been called an “oasis of life.” It consists of about 145 lakes that may total more than one-and-ahalf times the size of the United States. Animals that have been found in this environment include octopi, shrimplike amphipods, creatures called cnidarians that are related to corals and jelly fish, tubelike creatures called seasquirts, and large numbers of sea cucumbers. In conclusion, the creatures of Antarctica include a diverse range of familiar and unfamiliar lifeforms, from cute penguins to tiny mites that live in the soil. Although Antarctica does not contain as many species of living things as the warmer parts of the world do, the organisms it does contain are fascinating and different. Their special adaptations to the cold show that life can find ways to exist in many kinds of environments. As time goes on, scientists may find even more life-forms in the frigid Antarctic and, thus, learn more about how organisms adapt. Works Cited “Antarctica.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. 2007. Brahic, Catherine. “Life Under Larsen Revealed by Antarctic Survey.” New Scientist 26 Feb 2007: 6. Dell’Amore, Christine. “Antarctica May Contain ‘Oasis of Life.’” National Geographic News 27 Dec. 2007. National Geographic Society. 20 Mar. 2008 . Smith, Miranda. Living Earth. New York: DK Publishing, 1996. Strebel, Oliver, Robert Merki, and Ho Lik Man. “Life on Antarctica.” 1998. Oracle ThinkQuest Education Foundation. 20 Mar. 2008 . © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 2 of 2 Science | Time Line | Research Paper Time Line Research Paper You will complete this project over the course of 8 school days. Use this time line to help pace your work. Task Start Complete Read lesson: Planning Your Research Paper Submit topic to the teacher Day 1 Day 1 Read lesson: Finding and Using Information for Your Paper Locate resources and do research Day 2 Day 3 Read lesson: Organizing Notes and Developing an Outline Outline research paper Day 4 Day 4 Read lessons: Writing Your Paper Draft research paper Day 5 Day 6 Read lessons: Creating a Works Cited Page Create works cited page Day 7 Day 7 Read lesson: Revising and Proofreading Your Paper Finalize paper Day 8 Day 8 Unit Test: Submit research paper to the teacher Day 8 Day 8 © 2015 K12 Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited. Page 1 of 1 Topic for a Forensic Science paper Now you will begin thinking about your research paper. The first step is to find a topic. You don't have to make a decision about your topic yet. You do need to start searching for your topic. This is the moment when you dip your toe into the waters of the topic-finding process. For a research paper to be effective, two people have to be interested in the topic: the writer and the reader. If you pick a topic that interests you, you will have an enjoyable time looking information up and writing about it. Your reader will catch your enthusiasm because you will be sharing knowledge that you care about. For this Forensic Science research paper, you will focus on one of the following two areas:   History of the jury system Jury systems in different countries History of the jury system If you choose to focus on the history of the jury system, consider the following questions:       When and where did jury systems develop? What were early juries like? How many people served on juries and who were they? What was their role in the courts? How have jury systems evolved over time? What were the roles of juries during each time period with regard to fact finding, evaluating evidence, and evaluating expert witness testimony? These questions are a starting point for your idea. You don't need to address every question in this list. As you research, you may come up with other good questions to address. Jury systems in different countries If you choose to focus on jury systems in different countries, consider these questions:       What is the jury like in each country you chose? How many people are on juries and who serves? What is their role in the courts? What is their role in fact finding, evaluating evidence, and evaluating expert witness testimony? How are the juries of the three countries similar? How are they different? Again, use these questions as a starting point for your paper. Once you have an idea to work on, you need to make sure it is not too much to handle in a single paper or too little to supply a whole paper’s worth of information. The length of the paper is a factor in determining how broad or narrow the topic can be. Your paper should be 3–5 pages long, or approximately 900–1,500 words.
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Professor
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History of the jury system
It is of paramount importance to start this paper by giving the definition of the jury and the
jury system so as to provide an understanding of what is involved in the jury. The jury is a panel
that is made up of twelve

people and who are given the opportunity to hear criminal and civil

cases and provide a decision specifically on the matters of facts. The jury system has a long
history subject to different countries. For instance in England, the history of the jury system is
believed to be dated back to over 800 years.
The history of the jury is traced back to the times of Magna Carta. History shows that the
beginning of jury was in the form of a grand jury or what can be termed as the presentment jury.
The first jury was started courtesy of Frankish conquerors. The conquerors are believed to have
started the jury in order to discover the King’s rights. The earlier jury system was regularized by
the king of the time, Henry 11 so as to be able to establish royal control over...


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