WK 3 assignment worksheet

Writing

Ashford University

Question Description

Week 3 Assignment

In order to fulfill all parts of this assignment you must complete and submit the Week 3 Assignment Worksheet and upload to Waypoint. The Worksheet is a document template. This assignment is meant to help you get your Final Project started by

  • Focusing on your group.
  • Describing the events that you will discuss in your Final Project.
  • Locating the sources that you need for your Final Project.
  • Determining the direction of your project by writing a thesis statement.

To complete the worksheet, address the following points:

  • Pick a group.
  • Describe four specific events related to your group.
  • Locate two primary sources and two scholarly secondary sources. For help with identifying sources, review the Primary Sources or Scholarly Secondary Sources PDF handouts.
  • Cite your sources in APA and provide annotations for your sources.
  • Write an introductory paragraph with a thesis.

On the worksheet, you will find links to examples and explanations for all parts of the assignment. If you need more help, you may want to look at a sample completed worksheetto help you get started. For help locating primary sources refer to the HIS206: Primary Sources Research Guide. You can get help locating scholarly secondary sources in the HIS206: Scholarly Secondary Sources Research Guide.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Primary Sources For Week Three Bliven, B. (1925, Sept. 9). Flapper Jane. New Republic. Retrieved from http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113130/bruce-bliven-interviews-flapper A magazine article originally published in 1925 about flappers. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility Statement does not exist Privacy Policy Hardenbergh, M. (1923, Aug. 12). Taking the hand off the cradle to catch devil fish: How modern woman is delving into the sacred precincts of male occupation and is now found in the role of bandit, judge, bricklayer, hunter, and race horse jokey. The Atlanta Constitution, 2-3. Retrieved from http://www.americainclass.org/sources/becomingmodern/modernity/text2/colcommentarymo dernwoman.pdf A newspaper article published in 1923 about women working in formerly all-male jobs. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. Hartt, R. L. (1921, Jan. 15). “The new Negro”: “When he’s hit, he hits back!”. Independent, 76, 59-60. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5127 A newspaper article published in 1921 about a new determination among African Americans to achieve equality and respect. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. Indian Thorpe greatest sport marvel of all time. (1922, Feb. 18). The Evening World. Retrieved from http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/1922-02-18/ed-1/seq7.pdf A newspaper article published in 1922 about Jim Thorpe, a famous Native American athlete. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. Marshall, C. C. (1927). Should a Catholic be president?: A contemporary view of the 1928 election. Atlantic Monthly, 139, 540-544, 548-549. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5074 A magazine article published in 1927 arguing that Catholic Americans’ first loyalty was to the Pope and not country, making them unacceptable for holding high public office. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. McDougald, E. J. (1925). Elise Johnson McDonald on “The double task: The struggle of Negro women for sex and race emancipation”. In A. Locke (Ed.), The New Negro: An Interpretation. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5126 An essay published in 1925, discussing the challenges faced by African-American women in different economic groups. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. Smith, E. D. (1924). “Shut the door”: A senator speaks for immigration restriction. Congressional Record, 65, 5961–5962. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5080 An excerpt from a congressional debate on the Immigration Act of 1924 that illustrates attitudes toward different groups of immigrants at that time. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. U.S. v. Bhagat Singh Thind, 261 U.S. 204 (1923). Retrieved from Not all Caucasians are White: The supreme court rejects citizenship for Asian Indians http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5076 An excerpt from a Supreme Court ruling from 1923 in which the Justices ruled that only free whites could be US citizens. This is a primary source that can be used for discussions, as well as the Week Three Assignment and Final Project. Accessibility statement does not exist. Privacy policy does not exist. Secondary Sources What are Secondary Sources?     Secondary sources are accounts of historical events written after the event took place and by individuals who did not personally witness them. They are based on primary sources and backed up by other secondary sources. Often, the term “secondary source” is used interchangeably with the terms “academic source” or “scholarly source.” You should usually interpret instructions that ask for secondary sources as asking you for a peerreviewed journal article or book. Where do I find Secondary Sources?    Secondary sources are the product of the analyses of primary sources, with context provided by secondary sources. They are generally written by professional historians or students to build on the work of other historians. The best place to find secondary sources for your work is the Ashford University Library. What separates a Secondary Source from a Primary Source?   Secondary sources and memoirs and oral history interviews are all created after a historical event happened. The important difference is that secondary sources are not first-hand accounts, like memoirs or oral history interviews. What about textbooks and encyclopedias? Are they Secondary Sources?   Textbooks, encyclopedias and other reference works, and most documentaries and educational websites are not secondary sources because they are based only on secondary sources. They are called tertiary sources. Although they provide some good general information that can help students begin the research process, they are generally not acceptable for use in university-level work. ...
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