Write an 2-3 page Explication/Analysis Essay About the Poem "Sex Without Love"

Humanities

Santa Monica College

Question Description

MLA Format

3 Pages

Explication/Analysis Essay

Don't summarize the Poem

4-5 Paragraph Essay

2-3 Quotes per paragraph

No conclusion Paragraph

Poem:How do they do it, the ones who make love

without love? Beautiful as dancers,
gliding over each other like ice-skaters
over the ice, fingers hooked
inside each other's bodies, faces
red as steak, wine, wet as the
children at birth whose mothers are going to
give them away. How do they come to the
come to the come to the God come to the
still waters, and not love
the one who came there with them, light
rising slowly as steam off their joined
skin? These are the true religious,
the purists, the pros, the ones who will not
accept a false Messiah, love the
priest instead of the God. They do not
mistake the lover for their own pleasure,
they are like great runners: they know they are alone
with the road surface, the cold, the wind,
the fit of their shoes, their over-all cardio-
vascular health--just factors, like the partner
in the bed, and not the truth, which is the
single body alone in the universe
against its own best time.

This is an example of a B+ essay:

In “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden, the author expresses a sad, emotional story about a young man who leads a life with his mostly absent father. His dad, who is unable to be with his family due to the long hours at his blue-collar job, is primarily able to provide for his family, but not spend the amount of time necessary to maintain a healthy relationship. The poem opens with the words “Sundays too my father got up early” (Line 1), which highlights two very important words for discussion. The first being the fact that the father works on a Sunday, showing that even his weekends give him no break to spend with his child. The other being the use of the adverb “too”, which represents the consistency of his father’s work schedule, and helps set the theme for his father’s actions. His father, getting ready for the day ahead of him, is described as waking early and putting his clothes on in the “blueblack cold” (2) with “cracked hands that ached/from labor” (3-4), giving the reader a sense of just how rigorous the father’s daily schedule is, and how hard he works to provide for his child. The father is consistently portrayed as hardworking towards his family, with different metaphors and comments that reflect the brutal physical effects of his unapologetic work life. Following the different characteristics that are expressed regarding the character, the poem ends the first stanza with the depressing and worrisome statement that “no one ever thanked him” (5) for his efforts and hardships.

The second stanza opens from the perspective of the man’s child, and the time when he awakens before greeting his father. Starting off the day hearing the cold “splintering” and “breaking” (6), he hears his father call to him. The son knows that his father only calls onto him once the “rooms were warm” (7), therefore showing another expression of love of how the father prepares the room for his son to be comfortable. Interestingly enough, this expression of love is seemingly overlooked by the young son, with the son not thanking his father for accommodating him. Finally, as the son “ slowly would rise and dress” (8), one could say that the son was simply slow to getting dressed due to him just having woken up minutes before, but the subsequent line of text hint to a different idea altogether. Having just arisen from his bed, the son is said to be “fearing the chronic angers of that house”(9), seemingly inserting an array of emotions that are found under the surface of the relationship between the relatives. The chronic angers felt by the son are inferences to a sense of abandonment that the child feels towards his father’s regular absences in his life. Adding on to this, his son feels no excitement from knowing that he will see his father, and proceeds to slowly rise from his bed to prolong the moment.

Finally in the presence of his father, the son is seen to be “speaking indifferently” to him (10), due to the chronic anger that he feels towards his absent father figure. His indifference is simply a façade to help hide his emotions, with an emotionless demeanor being used to cover for his internal chronic anger. But the father, now having “driven out the cold”(11) and “polished his good shoes”(12) for the coming Sunday church mass, has done many things for the son that, at the time, has not been acknowledged nor understood. Finally, the child narrator exclaims “What did I know, what did I know/of loves austere and lonely offices?” (13-14) The child is now older and more learned, and reflects on his previous actions and attitude. The son, now being older and wiser, is able to notice the important things his father had provided for him in his youth, such as a warm roof over his head, which he consistently tailored towards his son’s comfort, and a devout belief in religion, which was signified by his father polishing his son’s good shoes to go to church for the Sunday mass. The father, while not having the time to pursue a more ornate and intimate relationship with his son, still has a strong love and affection for his offspring, and has given him many different underlying gifts that took him years to fully appreciate. In his youth, he knew nothing of the austere love that his father gave, and didn’t acknowledge the loneliness his father must have felt from his inability to bond with his own son. But finally, the son inevitably reflects on his childhood and notices the love of his father, and is finally appreciative towards it.


In “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden, the author expresses a sad, emotional story about a young man who leads a life with his mostly absent father. His dad, who is unable to be with his family due to the long hours at his blue-collar job, is primarily able to provide for his family, but not spend the amount of time necessary to maintain a healthy relationship. The poem opens with the words “Sundays too my father got up early” (Line 1), which highlights two very important words for discussion. The first being the fact that the father works on a Sunday, showing that even his weekends give him no break to spend with his child. The other being the use of the adverb “too”, which represents the consistency of his father’s work schedule, and helps set the theme for his father’s actions. His father, getting ready for the day ahead of him, is described as waking early and putting his clothes on in the “blueblack cold” (2) with “cracked hands that ached/from labor” (3-4), giving the reader a sense of just how rigorous the father’s daily schedule is, and how hard he works to provide for his child. The father is consistently portrayed as hardworking towards his family, with different metaphors and comments that reflect the brutal physical effects of his unapologetic work life. Following the different characteristics that are expressed regarding the character, the poem ends the first stanza with the depressing and worrisome statement that “no one ever thanked him” (5) for his efforts and hardships.

The second stanza opens from the perspective of the man’s child, and the time when he awakens before greeting his father. Starting off the day hearing the cold “splintering” and “breaking” (6), he hears his father call to him. The son knows that his father only calls onto him once the “rooms were warm” (7), therefore showing another expression of love of how the father prepares the room for his son to be comfortable. Interestingly enough, this expression of love is seemingly overlooked by the young son, with the son not thanking his father for accommodating him. Finally, as the son “ slowly would rise and dress” (8), one could say that the son was simply slow to getting dressed due to him just having woken up minutes before, but the subsequent line of text hint to a different idea altogether. Having just arisen from his bed, the son is said to be “fearing the chronic angers of that house”(9), seemingly inserting an array of emotions that are found under the surface of the relationship between the relatives. The chronic angers felt by the son are inferences to a sense of abandonment that the child feels towards his father’s regular absences in his life. Adding on to this, his son feels no excitement from knowing that he will see his father, and proceeds to slowly rise from his bed to prolong the moment.

Finally in the presence of his father, the son is seen to be “speaking indifferently” to him (10), due to the chronic anger that he feels towards his absent father figure. His indifference is simply a façade to help hide his emotions, with an emotionless demeanor being used to cover for his internal chronic anger. But the father, now having “driven out the cold”(11) and “polished his good shoes”(12) for the coming Sunday church mass, has done many things for the son that, at the time, has not been acknowledged nor understood. Finally, the child narrator exclaims “What did I know, what did I know/of loves austere and lonely offices?” (13-14) The child is now older and more learned, and reflects on his previous actions and attitude. The son, now being older and wiser, is able to notice the important things his father had provided for him in his youth, such as a warm roof over his head, which he consistently tailored towards his son’s comfort, and a devout belief in religion, which was signified by his father polishing his son’s good shoes to go to church for the Sunday mass. The father, while not having the time to pursue a more ornate and intimate relationship with his son, still has a strong love and affection for his offspring, and has given him many different underlying gifts that took him years to fully appreciate. In his youth, he knew nothing of the austere love that his father gave, and didn’t acknowledge the loneliness his father must have felt from his inability to bond with his own son. But finally, the son inevitably reflects on his childhood and notices the love of his father, and is finally appreciative towards it.

In “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden, the author expresses a sad, emotional story about a young man who leads a life with his mostly absent father. His dad, who is unable to be with his family due to the long hours at his blue-collar job, is primarily able to provide for his family, but not spend the amount of time necessary to maintain a healthy relationship. The poem opens with the words “Sundays too my father got up early” (Line 1), which highlights two very important words for discussion. The first being the fact that the father works on a Sunday, showing that even his weekends give him no break to spend with his child. The other being the use of the adverb “too”, which represents the consistency of his father’s work schedule, and helps set the theme for his father’s actions. His father, getting ready for the day ahead of him, is described as waking early and putting his clothes on in the “blueblack cold” (2) with “cracked hands that ached/from labor” (3-4), giving the reader a sense of just how rigorous the father’s daily schedule is, and how hard he works to provide for his child. The father is consistently portrayed as hardworking towards his family, with different metaphors and comments that reflect the brutal physical effects of his unapologetic work life. Following the different characteristics that are expressed regarding the character, the poem ends the first stanza with the depressing and worrisome statement that “no one ever thanked him” (5) for his efforts and hardships.

The second stanza opens from the perspective of the man’s child, and the time when he awakens before greeting his father. Starting off the day hearing the cold “splintering” and “breaking” (6), he hears his father call to him. The son knows that his father only calls onto him once the “rooms were warm” (7), therefore showing another expression of love of how the father prepares the room for his son to be comfortable. Interestingly enough, this expression of love is seemingly overlooked by the young son, with the son not thanking his father for accommodating him. Finally, as the son “ slowly would rise and dress” (8), one could say that the son was simply slow to getting dressed due to him just having woken up minutes before, but the subsequent line of text hint to a different idea altogether. Having just arisen from his bed, the son is said to be “fearing the chronic angers of that house”(9), seemingly inserting an array of emotions that are found under the surface of the relationship between the relatives. The chronic angers felt by the son are inferences to a sense of abandonment that the child feels towards his father’s regular absences in his life. Adding on to this, his son feels no excitement from knowing that he will see his father, and proceeds to slowly rise from his bed to prolong the moment.

Finally in the presence of his father, the son is seen to be “speaking indifferently” to him (10), due to the chronic anger that he feels towards his absent father figure. His indifference is simply a façade to help hide his emotions, with an emotionless demeanor being used to cover for his internal chronic anger. But the father, now having “driven out the cold”(11) and “polished his good shoes”(12) for the coming Sunday church mass, has done many things for the son that, at the time, has not been acknowledged nor understood. Finally, the child narrator exclaims “What did I know, what did I know/of loves austere and lonely offices?” (13-14) The child is now older and more learned, and reflects on his previous actions and attitude. The son, now being older and wiser, is able to notice the important things his father had provided for him in his youth, such as a warm roof over his head, which he consistently tailored towards his son’s comfort, and a devout belief in religion, which was signified by his father polishing his son’s good shoes to go to church for the Sunday mass. The father, while not having the time to pursue a more ornate and intimate relationship with his son, still has a strong love and affection for his offspring, and has given him many different underlying gifts that took him years to fully appreciate. In his youth, he knew nothing of the austere love that his father gave, and didn’t acknowledge the loneliness his father must have felt from his inability to bond with his own son. But finally, the son inevitably reflects on his childhood and notices the love of his father, and is finally appreciative towards it.

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