Ashford University Episode 28 Static Electricity Mechanical Universe Paper

User Generated

zf7fi7

Science

ashford university

Description

Watch the Mechanical Universe: Episode 28 at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyMmRRIB5yw

After watching the video, please upload a 1 paragraph summary detailing the most important concepts discussed. Please submit the assignment here in a Microsoft Word document.


Watch the Mechanical Universe: Episode 49 at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca10Sz1lPFE

After watching the video, please upload a 1 paragraph summary detailing the most important concepts discussed. Please submit the assignment here in a Microsoft Word document.


Watch the Mechanical Universe: Episode 25 at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkFD9ZPM3Jg

After watching the video, please upload a 1 paragraph summary detailing the most important concepts discussed. Please submit the assignment here in a Microsoft Word document.


Watch the Mechanical Universe: Episode 50 at the following link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STJbtg-p4EA

After watching the video, please upload a 1 paragraph summary detailing the most important concepts discussed. Please submit the assignment here in a Microsoft Word document.


Watch the Mechanical Universe: Episode 52 at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tl-C1r3IabY

After watching the video, please upload a 1 paragraph summary detailing the most important concepts discussed. Please submit the assignment here in a Microsoft Word document.

User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Explanation & Answer

Hi 👋 Here's your finished output:

Mechanical Universe
Episode 28: Static Electricity
Back in the day where the curriculum hasn’t yet been established, scientists make their
living through lectures. And to attract students, they perform grand schemes, this is greatly
portrayed by electricity. But whether it be magic or science, the Greeks pursued studying this
phenomenon, they found out that when you rub a wand on a rabbit’s fur, it can attract pieces of
paper. In the early 1700s, people started to study the problem of electricity. One of the first to
showcase positive and negative charge was Benjamin Franklin where he described “something
called charge, the electric charge is the cause of electric force” and he describes matter as being
neutral with ‘electric fluid’, with matter that showcases a net positive charge has too much of
electric fluid and vice versa. But what is the relation between charge and force? This is answered
by Charles-Augustin de Coulomb who did an experiment that would explain their relationship. And
according to Coulomb's law, “the electric force is proportional to the product of the charges
and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the charges” or 𝐹
𝐾𝑒

𝑞 1𝑞 2
𝑟.
𝑟 2

𝑒

=

It is known that opposite charges attract one another, therefore, as according to

Coulomb's law again, “The force 2 charges exert on a third is the vector sum of the forces each
alone would exert.”. Forces from any number of positive and negative charges add together as a
vector, so the total force is still calculated from Coulomb's law. The electric charge both exerts
and experiences the electric force, and the electric force obeys Coulomb's law. The polarity of
material is explained when a charge is brought up on a surface of a material, the opposite charge
will pile up on the near-surface, and the opposite charge will be left behind on the other surface,
leaving an unbalanced state. Metal is a very good example that shows the element of electricity.
Before it was only thought of as its malleability and luster, later on, it’s conductivity was
discovered, whereby its essence, electrons are easily passed to a neighboring atom. Electric
charge piling up at one pole can be portrayed in an electrical instrument called “gold leaf
electroscope”. When a charge is brought near its disc, the gold leaf will rise up because a positive
charge will be brought up in reaction to the negative charge being brought near the disc, leaving
a net negative charge on the rod and gold foil. But the gold leaf will stay up when the charge and
the disc are brought into contact, leaving a net negative charge. This effect would only be reversed
when the disc comes into contact with a greater conductor, in this case, the earth with the charge

being passed through the hand. The hand, being a conductor itself will connect the rod with the
electroscope case and the electroscope case is connected to the earth. With the earth being a
large conductor itself, it will distribute the charge. But how is the electric charge being conducted
in this case? Well, first, through static. As a wand is being rubbed to a rabbit’s fur, it can attract
pieces of paper. In the 19th century, scientists made an electric conductor by spinning an insulator
such as glass. But by the 20th century, Robert Van der Graaf made the same principle with a
twist on his machine. This has been proven useful not just to spark an audience, but it provided
a basis for the modern nuclear physics laboratory machinery. Later on, the introduction of the
Wimshurst machine by James Wimshurst produced little thunderbolt between 2 metals.

Episode 49: The Atom
In 1930, the question of what is a matter made was fresh on the mind of Niels Henrik David
Bohr, his answer was the model of the hydrogen atom. It was a turning point in theoretical physics,
even though questioned at that time. Bhor adopted a model of an atom that resembles the model
of a solar system, a positive nucleus took the place of the sun, and like a planet, an electron is
placed in orbit of the nucleus. But while the planet is attracted to the sun due to gravity, electrons
are held up to its nucleus by the force of electricity. So in spite of the differences, both would have
forces of the same basics, 𝐹 = 𝑟

𝐷
2

, and both would have the same kinds of orbits. As Jo...


Anonymous
Great study resource, helped me a lot.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4
Similar Content
Related Tags