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Bella Capelli Academy in Robinson Linear Momentum in Collisions Lab Report

Bella Capelli Academy in Robinson

Question Description

I have attached the labs and quiz is flexible however I would like to start 20th july monday 8:30 am est.

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Name:__________________ Date:____________________ PHY231 Conservation of mechanical energy: Conservation of energy is given by the equation: 𝐾𝐸𝑖 + 𝑃𝐸𝑖 + π‘Šπ‘œπ‘‘β„Žπ‘’π‘Ÿ = 𝐾𝐸𝑓 + 𝑃𝐸𝑓 Instruction: PART:A 1. Go to https://ophysics.com/f2.html 2. Set kinetic and static coefficients to zero. 3. Set angle = 100 and initial velocity v0 =0 4. Run from left top corner. Pause when mass reaches to the bottom of the horizontal line as shown by an arrow. 5. Record the slant height Ξ”x (the distance mass slides down the plane) and velocity 6. Calculate the height using figure as shown 7. Calculate PE = mgh and KE at top and bottom. Take final PE=0 8. Repeat 3 times βˆ†π‘₯ β„Ž = βˆ†π‘₯ π‘ π‘–π‘›πœƒ Prepared by: Dr. Parshu Gyawali πœƒ Name:__________________ Date:____________________ PHY231 Data: Angle of inclination ΞΈ = 100, mass = 5 kg Mass kg Angle Ξ”x Final velocity PEi +KEi KEf +PEf PART 2: 1. Set m= 5 kg, angle = 100 and static frictionπœ‡π‘  = 0.15 π‘Žπ‘›π‘‘ π‘œπ‘“ π‘˜π‘–π‘›π‘’π‘‘π‘–π‘ π‘“π‘Ÿπ‘–π‘π‘‘π‘–π‘œπ‘› πœ‡π‘˜ = 0.1 2. Set initial velocity v0= 0 Mass kg Angle Ξ”x Final velocity PEi +Kei (1) KEf +PEf (2) Question: 1. Where does the energy difference come from in part 2? βƒ—βƒ—βƒ— = 𝐹 . 𝑆 2. Calculate the kinetic friction force using data from Part 2. π‘Š Prepared by: Dr. Parshu Gyawali W(other) =(2)-(1) Name:__________________ Date:____________________ PHY231 3. Is there any relation between the work done by friction and Wother?. How you related W(other) with friction? 4. Suppose you tried to run experiment, as in part 2, for small angle 20. Can you run the experiment? Why not? (Justify your answer with calculated values). Prepared by: Dr. Parshu Gyawali Linear Momentum in Collisions Goal: To investigate the Law of Conservation of Linear Momentum in collisions. Simulation Used: Collision Lab from the PhET at the University of Colorado. Preliminary Settings. ● Open the simulation Collision Lab. ● From the menu on the right, select: Show Values ● In the yellow window below, click on "More Data" Activity 1: Elastic Collisions in one dimension. Ball 2 is initially at rest. ● On the menu to the right, slide the indicator all the way to the right for a perfectly elastic collision. ● For the given masses and initial speeds of the two balls, determine the velocity and momentum after the collision. Ball Mass (kg) Before the Collision V (m/s) 1 0.50 1.20 2 0.50 0 Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 1.50 0.90 2 0.50 0 Mass (kg) Momentum (kg.m/s) 1 0.50 1.40 2 1.50 0 Momentum (kg.m/s) v (m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) After the Collision Momentum initial= Ball v (m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Question: Is the momentum conserved? After the Collision v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Question: Is the kinetic energy conserved? Activity 2: Elastic Collisions in one dimension. Balls 1 and 2 initially moving in the same direction. Ball Mass (kg) Before the Collision v (m/s) 1 0.50 0.80 2 0.50 0.30 Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 1.50 1.20 2 0.50 0.50 Mass (kg) Momentum (kg.m/s) 1 0.50 1.20 2 1.50 0.30 v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) After the Collision Momentum initial= Ball v (m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) After the Collision After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Question: Is the momentum conserved? Question: Is the kinetic energy conserved? v (m/s) Momentum final= Momentum (kg.m/s) Activity 3: Elastic Collisions in one dimension. Balls 1 and 2 initially moving in the opposite direction. Note that when Ball 2 moves opposite to Ball 1, its velocity and momentum are negative. Ball Mass (kg) Before the Collision v (m/s) 1 0.50 1.20 2 0.50 - 0.30 After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 1.50 1.20 2 0.50 -0.70 After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 0.50 1.20 2 1.50 -1.20 v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) v (m/s) After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Question: Is the momentum conserved? Question: Is the kinetic energy conserved? v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Activity 4: Inelastic Collisions. On the menu to the left, slide the indicator all the way to the left to ensure perfectly inelastic collision. Ball Mass (kg) Before the Collision v (m/s) 1 0.50 1.20 2 0.50 0 After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 1.50 1.20 2 0.50 -0.20 After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= Ball Mass (kg) 1 0.50 1.20 2 1.50 -1.80 v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Before the Collision v (m/s) v (m/s) After the Collision Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum initial= v (m/s) Momentum (kg.m/s) Momentum final= Question: Is the momentum conserved? Question: Is the kinetic energy conserved? Acknowledgements. Tatiana Stantcheva, Northern Virginia community College. The Java Applet comes from the PhET Interactive Simulations at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Some activities are based on the "Laboratory Manual, Physics 231 - 232" by Walter Wimbush, Northern Virginia Community College, 2008. ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Linear Momentum in Collisions
Goal: To investigate the Law of Conservation of Linear Momentum in collisions.
Simulation Used: Collision Lab from the PhET at the University of Colorado.
Preliminary Settings.
● Open the simulation Collision Lab.
● From the menu on the right, select: Show Values
● In the yellow window below, click on "More Data"
Activity 1: Elastic Collisions in one dimension. Ball 2 is initially at rest.
● On the menu to the right, slide the indicator all the way to the right for a perfectly
elastic collision.
● For the given masses and initial speeds of the two balls, determine the velocity
and momentum after the collision.
Ball

Mass (kg)

Before the Collision
V (m/s)

Momentum (kg.m/s)

After the Collision
v (m/s)

Momentum (kg.m/s)

1

0.50

1.20

0.6

0.00

0

2

0.50

0

0

1.20

0.6

Momentum initial= 0.6 kg.m/s
Ball

Mass (kg)

Before the Collision
v (m/s)

Momentum final= 0.6 kg.m/s
After the Collision

Momentum (kg.m/s)

v (m/s)

1

1.50

0.90

1.35

0.45

2

0.50

0

0

1.35

Momentum initial=
Ball

Mass (kg)

1.35kg.m/s

Momentum (kg.m/s)

0.68

0.68
Momentum final= 1.36kg.m/s

Before the Collision

v (m/s)

Momentum (kg.m/s)

After the Collision

v (m/s)

Momentum (kg.m/s)

1

0.50

1.40

0.70

-7.0

-0.35

2

1.50

0

0.00

0.7

1.05

Momentum initial= 0.70kg.m/s

Question: Is the momentum conserved? Yes
Question: Is the kinetic energy conserved? Yes

Momentum final= 0.70 kg.m/s

Activity 2: Elastic Collisions in one dimension. Balls 1 and 2 initially moving in the same ...

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Carnegie Mellon University

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