Humanities
Bergen Community College Racial Slavery System in America Discussion

Bergen Community College

Question Description

go to the textbook and use that provide more context to provide more background to help the reader understand how these things develop over time because that is what you were writing about after all

You mostly are writing about just some helpful 1742 South Carolina slave codes are helpful but they're not the entire answer because that's not the first time that we have laws in the English colonies regarding slavery and so you you really need to go back spend time with a textbook and also lectures more information should be able to be able to provide can answer that helps the reader understand development of this

you need to talk about these ideas in other by looking at other laws because the South Carolina slave codes

the idea that slavery is hereditary that doesn't start and 1740 right so you need to help the reader better understand how and why this and when which then I guess that's the other major suggestion is providing sense of time throughout this essay because really throughout all of it that's not that's not present so if I'm reading this and I'm not already familiar with this material I'm not going to know what's happening I'm not going to understand when these things are taking place I'm not going to be able to compare one time to another I'm not going to be able to see how things are changing over time so you don't always need a specific year but you do need when you're talk about developments and you're talking about a particular law or ideas changing you need to give the reader a sense of why this is happening whether it's a decade or a particular part of the Century Middle or if you do have a particular year than straight all right to think about these things and if you have any questions feel free to let me know

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Racial Slavery System in America Establishment of a legal framework that ratified and formalized slavery in the colonies is one of the major factors that contributed to perpetual discrimination and relegation of African Americans into perpetual suffering. Besides making slave trade legitimate, the various laws enacted across colonies gave immense powers to slave merchants and masters over the control and treatment of slaves. Courtesy of these laws geared towards protecting a business that was seen as the focal point of the colonies' economic survival, slavery became virtually an inevitable destiny for non-whites. In particular, the laws enhanced a perception that every African was a slave and should be treated as such, including by courts, unless proven otherwise. The series of laws authorized by the leaders across the colonies culminated in creating a rigid legal structure that held slaves mainly of African origin and their descendants into perpetual bondage, oppression. Why Colonial Leaders Established a Legal Framework for Slavery Several factors help to explain why colonial leaders in the colonies established a legal framework for the slavery system. Booming slave trade across the Atlantic Ocean involving Africa, Europe, and the Americas is one of the factors that necessitated the establishment of a legal framework to govern slavery. Besides giving the chilling experience that the slaves aboard ships mainly from Africa where free persons were sold as slaves to merchants who then sold them to Americas, Barbot gives a detailed account of how the slave trade was organized and operated. He explains that ships usually transported between five to six hundred slaves who were often mistreated, beaten, and even killed as part of maintaining law and order (35). Slave trade evolved into a flourishing business that was controlled by rich and influential merchants during the peak of European settlement in the colonies. It needed to be promoted and sustained, and there was no better way to achieve this end than to establish legal frameworks to protect and govern it. Extreme power and influence held by slave merchants and masters within the colonies also explain why laws favoring permanent enslavement of Africans were enacted. Slave merchants and masters often held leadership positions within the colonial administrative structure. This allowed them to influence the making process that ended up creating punitive laws that deprived slaves of all rights. The fact slaves were mainly captured and solved to provide free labor in the plantations is another factor that explains the punitive laws passed to safeguard slavery. Total disregard of the plight of the enslaved persons’ rights from the time they were captured, sold, and transported in ships to final destination mainly Europe and Americas also favored the creation of a legal framework for slavery (McCord 1). The need to portray and enhance settler power and permanently contain slaves from achieving economic empowerment once free also explain why these laws became popular across colonies. Key Features of the Laws Slaves were equated to personal property at law. Slave owners or masters had the discretion of how they could treat slaves. Various laws enacted viewed blacks, Indians, or multiracial individuals naturally as slaves (McCord 2). A child born to a slave was naturally property of the master owning their parents. Since their worth was akin to personal property, they were subjected to punitive treatment that included beating and whipping (Byrd 44). In other words, masters were given absolute power over the treatment and handling of slaves in their custody. Another key feature of the laws was the permanent confinement of slaves within plantation boundaries. Slaves could not move freely, exercise freedom of speech, and or convene to chart their common destiny. The movement was legally restricted such that a slave could not move beyond the town or provincial boundaries unless when being bought or sold (McCord 2). Slaves’ movement was restricted mainly to their masters’ plantations or farms where they were designated to work. In instances that necessitated movement beyond plantation boundaries, a ticket or letter from master specifying purpose and destination of movement was required (McCord 2). Such a ticket or letter had to be signed by the master owning the particular slave. Where a ticket or letter was absent, any white person had the right of subjecting the slave in question to reasonable punishment. Imposition of fines for causing harm on slaves against persons with no direct or sufficient authority over a slave was another aspect of the laws. Since slaves were viewed as property, laws protecting the ability of slave owners and masters to derive economic benefit from a slave occasioned by a third party were enacted (McCord 3). The fines offered were meant to compensate slave owners for economic value lost, associated with time and cost of treatment incurred (McCord 3). The fines were paid in current monetary terms and required to be offset in full. These charges also served to streamline the power and authority over the control of slaves such that enslaved individuals were answerable to specific persons. Contribution of the Laws to the Racial Slavery System The laws entrenched the racial slavery system by making slavery hereditary or intergenerational. For example, in the province of South Carolina, there was a law that declared that all Black and Indian slaves and all their children and posterity would forever remain slaves, equivalent to chattels personal of their owners and possessors. The same act proposed that all Blacks, Indians, mulatto, and mestizo were always assumed to be slaves whenever brought before a court of law until evidence proved otherwise (McCord 1). This means that the laws made slavery something that was inherent in and inseparable from any non-White race. With laws of this nature in place, it can be argued that slavery came to be viewed not as a vice but as a normal societal characteristic. The laws contributed further to the racial slavery system by closing all the loopholes that slaves would exploit to trigger individual or organized resistance. This helped to promote order. Laws such as those enacted in South Carolina severely limited the movement of slaves beyond their farms and towns (McCord 2). This denied slaves from different localities opportunities to assemble and conspire against their masters or the slavery system. Resistance, which was the major problem that needed to be kept at bay to allow the racial slavery system to thrive, was further mitigated or made impossible by sanctioning the killing of slaves that became rebellious to any White person who sought to verify the legality of their movement beyond their dwellings or plantations (McCord 2). On the same point of maintaining order, which was important for the survival of the racial slavery system, the laws helped to prevent conflicts between slave owners. Slave owners retained exclusive rights over their slaves who, at law, were synonymous with chattel personal. Laws that defined penalties against people who encroached the slave ownership rights of another person, for example, by appearing to give a slave who were not under their care a ticket or license for movement (McCord 2), cultivated harmony among slave owners. This way, they maintained a common vision of sustaining the racial slavery system, which was pivotal to the economic viability of plantations and the colonies at large. Works Cited Barbort, James. "An Abstract of a Voyage to the Congo River, or the Zair, and to Cabinde in the Year 1700." Collection of Voyages and Travels, 546-48, 1732. McCord, David. "The Statutes at Large of South Carolina." Containing the Acts Relating to Charleston, Courts, Slaves, and Rivers, A.S. Johnston, 1840. William, Byrd. "Southern Planter William Byrd Describes His Views towards Learning and His Slaves, 1709-170." Major Problems in American History, 1709. Racial Slavery System in America Establishment of a legal framework that ratified and formalized slavery in the colonies is one of the major factors that contributed to perpetual discrimination and relegation of African Americans into perpetual suffering. Besides making slave trade legitimate, the various laws enacted across colonies gave immense powers to slave merchants and masters over the control and treatment of slaves. Courtesy of these laws geared towards protecting a business that was seen as the focal point of the colonies' economic survival, slavery became virtually an inevitable destiny for non-whites. In particular, the laws enhanced a perception that every African was a slave and should be treated as such, including by courts, unless proven otherwise. The series of laws authorized by the leaders across the colonies culminated in creating a rigid legal structure that held slaves mainly of African origin and their descendants into perpetual bondage, oppression. Why Colonial Leaders Established a Legal Framework for Slavery Several factors help to explain why colonial leaders in the colonies established a legal framework for the slavery system. Booming slave trade across the Atlantic Ocean involving Africa, Europe, and the Americas is one of the factors that necessitated the establishment of a legal framework to govern slavery. Besides giving the chilling experience that the slaves aboard ships mainly from Africa where free persons were sold as slaves to merchants who then sold them to Americas, Barbot gives a detailed account of how the slave trade was organized and operated. He explains that ships usually transported between five to six hundred slaves who were often mistreated, beaten, and even killed as part of maintaining law and order (35). Slave trade evolved into a flourishing business that was controlled by rich and influential merchants during the peak of European settlement in the colonies. It needed to be promoted and sustained, and there was no better way to achieve this end than to establish legal frameworks to protect and govern it. Extreme power and influence held by slave merchants and masters within the colonies also explain why laws favoring permanent enslavement of Africans were enacted. Slave merchants and masters often held leadership positions within the colonial administrative structure. This allowed them to influence the making process that ended up creating punitive laws that deprived slaves of all rights. The fact slaves were mainly captured and solved to provide free labor in the plantations is another factor that explains the punitive laws passed to safeguard slavery. Total disregard of the plight of the enslaved persons’ rights from the time they were captured, sold, and transported in ships to final destination mainly Europe and Americas also favored the creation of a legal framework for slavery (McCord 1). The need to portray and enhance settler power and permanently contain slaves from achieving economic empowerment once free also explain why these laws became popular across colonies. Key Features of the Laws Slaves were equated to personal property at law. Slave owners or masters had the discretion of how they could treat slaves. Various laws enacted viewed blacks, Indians, or multiracial individuals naturally as slaves (McCord 2). A child born to a slave was naturally property of the master owning their parents. Since their worth was akin to personal property, they were subjected to punitive treatment that included beating and whipping (Byrd 44). In other words, masters were given absolute power over the treatment and handling of slaves in their custody. Another key feature of the laws was the permanent confinement of slaves within plantation boundaries. Slaves could not move freely, exercise freedom of speech, and or convene to chart their common destiny. The movement was legally restricted such that a slave could not move beyond the town or provincial boundaries unless when being bought or sold (McCord 2). Slaves’ movement was restricted mainly to their masters’ plantations or farms where they were designated to work. In instances that necessitated movement beyond plantation boundaries, a ticket or letter from master specifying purpose and destination of movement was required (McCord 2). Such a ticket or letter had to be signed by the master owning the particular slave. Where a ticket or letter was absent, any white person had the right of subjecting the slave in question to reasonable punishment. Imposition of fines for causing harm on slaves against persons with no direct or sufficient authority over a slave was another aspect of the laws. Since slaves were viewed as property, laws protecting the ability of slave owners and masters to derive economic benefit from a slave occasioned by a third party were enacted (McCord 3). The fines offered were meant to compensate slave owners for economic value lost, associated with time and cost of treatment incurred (McCord 3). The fines were paid in current monetary terms and required to be offset in full. These charges also served to streamline the power and authority over the control of slaves such that enslaved individuals were answerable to specific persons. Contribution of the Laws to the Racial Slavery System The laws entrenched the racial slavery system by making slavery hereditary or intergenerational. For example, in the province of South Carolina, there was a law that declared that all Black and Indian slaves and all their children and posterity would forever remain slaves, equivalent to chattels personal of their owners and possessors. The same act proposed that all Blacks, Indians, mulatto, and mestizo were always assumed to be slaves whenever brought before a court of law until evidence proved otherwise (McCord 1). This means that the laws made slavery something that was inherent in and inseparable from any non-White race. With laws of this nature in place, it can be argued that slavery came to be viewed not as a vice but as a normal societal characteristic. The laws contributed further to the racial slavery system by closing all the loopholes that slaves would exploit to trigger individual or organized resistance. This helped to promote order. Laws such as those enacted in South Carolina severely limited the movement of slaves beyond their farms and towns (McCord 2). This denied slaves from different localities opportunities to assemble and conspire against their masters or the slavery system. Resistance, which was the major problem that needed to be kept at bay to allow the racial slavery system to thrive, was further mitigated or made impossible by sanctioning the killing of slaves that became rebellious to any White person who sought to verify the legality of their movement beyond their dwellings or plantations (McCord 2). On the same point of maintaining order, which was important for the survival of the racial slavery system, the laws helped to prevent conflicts between slave owners. Slave owners retained exclusive rights over their slaves who, at law, were synonymous with chattel personal. Laws that defined penalties against people who encroached the slave ownership rights of another person, for example, by appearing to give a slave who were not under their care a ticket or license for movement (McCord 2), cultivated harmony among slave owners. This way, they maintained a common vision of sustaining the racial slavery system, which was pivotal to the economic viability of plantations and the colonies at large. Works Cited Barbort, James. "An Abstract of a Voyage to the Congo River, or the Zair, and to Cabinde in the Year 1700." Collection of Voyages and Travels, 546-48, 1732. McCord, David. "The Statutes at Large of South Carolina." Containing the Acts Relating to Charleston, Courts, Slaves, and Rivers, A.S. Johnston, 1840. William, Byrd. "Southern Planter William Byrd Describes His Views towards Learning and His Slaves, 1709-170." Major Problems in American History, 1709. ...
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Racial Slavery System in America
Establishment of a legal framework that ratified and formalized slavery in the colonies is
one of the major factors that contributed to perpetual discrimination and relegation of African
Americans into perpetual suffering. Besides making slave trade legitimate, the various laws
enacted across colonies gave immense powers to slaveholders over the control and treatment of
slaves. Courtesy of these laws geared towards protecting a business that was seen as the focal
point of the colonies' economic survival, slavery became virtually an inevitable destiny for nonwhites. In particular, the laws enhanced a perception that every African was a slave and should
be treated as such, including by courts, unless proven otherwise. The series of laws authorized by
the leaders across the colonies culminated in creating a rigid legal structure that held slaves
mainly of African origin and their descendants into perpetual bondage, oppression.
Why Colonial Leaders Established a Legal Framework for Slavery
Development and expansion of agricultural production in the colonies was one of the
major factors that contributed to the establishment of a legal framework that governed slavery.
Settlers, who moved to the southern colonies, were mainly attracted by the expansive lands,
favorable climate, and fertile soils conducive for plantation farming (Clark 93). The high demand
for slave labor which was used in tobacco, rice, and cotton plantations and subsequent shipping
of part of the produce to Europe resulted in the expansion of the Trans-Atlantic trade that
involved Europe, African, and America. With the number of slaves arriving at the colonies
increasing by day hence making the trade extremely lucrative, so were the laws enacted by
colonial governments and enforced by the courts. With the number of slaves increasing due to
tobacco and cotton economy expansion, various colonies started enacting punitive laws against

slaves mainly of African descent. Virginia which was one of the largest col...

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