MIT 1070 UTS Wk 4 Digital Publishing Production Communication Fundamental Right Essay

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Humanities

MIT 1070

University of Technology Sydney

MIT

Description

Length: Create three originally composited digital images as a set of viable options; In addition to the three final images, you also need to submit 1 x 1000-word documentation/reflection on the images and process; and contribute 3 x 150-word comments on work made by your peers.

Due Date: 11.59pm Sunday 18 October 2020 Submission Format: Turnitin.

Subject Objectives: a, b and c.

CILOS: 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 5.1, 6.2

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54001 Digital Literacies Assessment Item 2: Digital Publishing Production (60%) Task Description Using the digital publishing system used for Assessment 1 (WordPress), students undertake an iterative, process-based approach to creating and publishing digital images or posters that engage with image manipulation and compositing. As a form of practice-based exploration, students publish work-in-progress documentation on both the theoretical and practical experimentation involved in their digital image production, and critically reflect on how their work engages with the ethical responsibilities of multimodal and participatory communication. Students also post comments on student blogs as a form of peer feedback and critical engagement with their peers, and select their 3 best comments to be included along with their submission. Students are required in weeks 11 and 12 to present an in-class demonstration of their material to their peers reflecting on their production process. Specifications Length: Due Date: Submission Format: Subject Objectives: CILOS: Create three originally composited digital images as a set of viable options; In addition to the three final images, you also need to submit 1 x 1000-word documentation/reflection on the images and process; and contribute 3 x 150-word comments on work made by your peers. 11.59pm Sunday 18 October 2020 Turnitin. a, b and c. 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 5.1, 6.2 Criteria Criteria Creativity of concepts and theories Aesthetic and technical refinement Clarity of iterative, process-based documentation Critical reflection on ethical aspects of production Depth of engagement in peer feedback Weighting 20% 20% 30% 15% 15% 1 Further Information All component images that are used in this assessment item must be either the students original work, or be images that are usable with permission: for example, images licensed under creative commons, public domain images, or other free image licensing agreements, and be documented via their WordPress site. Students must reflect on and ensure they are upholding all ethical responsibilities of sourcing all visual material used. Once completed and placed on their website, students must once again collect their documentation of work for A2 (including written drafts, in-progress and final versions of all images, and peer comments made on other student work) into a document for final submission through Turnitin. Following the submission of the final works at the end of week 11, in week 12 there will be an informal showcase session where students will present their final submissions and get a chance to see each other's as well. Brief and FAQ An organisation related to your discipline has commissioned you to produce three digital images for a communications campaign about digital literacy. Alongside these three images, the organisation also requires you to write and submit a 1000-word document explaining the technical, creative and theoretical process that you engaged in while creating the images, including draft in-progress versions of each of the three final images. The organisation would like you to also contribute 3 x 150-word comments on work made by your peers, and expects you to submit these in addition to the three images and 1000-word document of your own. In order to help focus the visual communication the organisation requires you to pick one of the following digital literacy concept pairs as a theme for your three images. Digital Literacy concept pairs: • Mobile/mobility • Access/divide • Data/surveillance • Old/new • Participation/interaction • Real/manipulated • Selfie/portrait The method Use Pixlr (free and preferred), Photoshop, GIMP or other full featured image editing software (avoid basic filter apps like VSCO, etc) to create originally composited digital images as a set 2 of viable options for the organisation. Compose the image by arranging and compositing your own source images (photos, drawings, etc.), text elements, and appropriately sourced visual material that you have permission to use (e.g. creative commons licensed images, royalty free image sites like Unsplash – this means doing more than just a quick google image search) The aim of this assignment is to develop your digital literacy skills through combining both theory and practice to produce creative, considered and original visual communication. We strongly recommend you extend yourself by using specialist image manipulation software rather than basic apps that simply apply filters, etc. Please refer to the assignment marking criteria for more advice on this. The final due date is Week 11, Sunday October 18, by 11.59pm, however just like A1 you are expected to be working each week by posting drafts to your WordPress site. Please do not make a separate WordPress site – use the same site and URL as you used on A1. Your tutor will provide you with an expected timeline and a process so that you can comment on your peers’ work and contribute to the development of both your critical analysis and your ability to share constructive, considered feedback with others. Please submit a copy of your 1000 words of documentation describing the creative, conceptual and technical process you used to create your images (as well as the images themselves). In your submission you also need to include your 3 x 150-word peer comments. Submit this complete document to Turnitin by the due date, and keep it posted on your WordPress – the documentation on your WordPress and your written submission should be the same. FURTHER GUIDANCE & FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What organisations can I pick? Any organisation that is relevant to or involved with your discipline in some way. We are providing a separate list of suggestions elsewhere on UTS Online. Here are some suggested types of organisation: • An NGO • A community newspaper • A local library • A government department • An arts festival • A policy Think Tank These are just a few examples, and you are free to be creative in your choice. If you are concerned about whether you have chosen an appropriate organisation, discuss it with your tutor. 3 Does it have to be a real organisation? Yes, but you can choose from anything that might be relevant to your discipline. If in doubt, please ask during class and we can help you decide. Do they have to be involved with or around Digital Literacy issues already? No – this might be their first time considering or communicating about digital literacy for their organisation or their audience, which is why they have asked you, the expert in it, to produce these three images for their campaign. How many images do I submit to be marked? You need to submit 3 final images – with each communicating about the digital literacy concept pair as relevant to your discipline. In order to show the process you undertook to reach these final images, you will also include one or more ‘draft’ or ‘in-progress’ versions of these 3 images to show the iterative creative process you have undertaken. There is no maximum number of ‘draft’ versions you may include to show the iterative process of developing your visual communication, however it is not necessary to show every tiny change. Stick to showing the major conceptual and/or technical advances along the way. If you gave up on a certain creative direction, or went ‘back to the drawing board’ on an idea because it just wasn’t really working – you can show that too, and include it as part of the documentation. We want to see your creative and conceptual journey – not just the finished end product. Can the 3 images be on different digital literacy concept pairs? No, we want three images on the one concept pair (so all three would respond in some way to ‘mobile/mobility’, for example). They do not have to be about identical aspects of the prompt, but they have to be responding to the same prompt, for the same organisation relevant to your discipline/major. What if I am doing a double major? That’s ok – just pick one and focus on how the prompt is relevant to it for your visual communication in the 3 images and explanation. How do I decide what to communicate with the images? A good way to start would be to return to Buckingham’s framework from week 2 and the four words/areas he categorised aspects of digital literacy into and think through them again. What might your organisation want to communicate about one of these? Then use the prompt pairing to start figuring out what that might look like, and then just start experimenting. Part of any creative process is always getting over that hurdle of the blank page – just try something out and even if it’s not a great success, it might spark other ideas. I’m really stuck and out of ideas though If you really, truly get can’t think of anything at all for your organisation and concept pair, look at one of the readings or examples we have looked at in the first half of semester – can you 4 realise something raised in one of them in a visual way? What might Netflix have to say about inclusion and access? What might an arts festival want to communicate about Indigenous perspectives on digital literacy? Is there anything a local newspaper might want to show visually about expressions of care and support online? Think about the different audiences that your organisation might want to communicate to and what they might like to say. What do I need to write for the 1000-word document? Does it need references? If so, how many? Your 1000 words needs to meet the criteria for this assignment, clearly attending to criteria 14 in particular; “Creativity of concepts and theories explored”; “Aesthetic and technical refinement within images”; “Clarity of iterative, process-based documentation” and “Critical reflection on ethical aspects of production”. We expect at least 5 academic references across the whole submission to support your document and you can take these from the DL course reading list. You are also encouraged to draw on references from your core discipline, especially if you’re using some of that theory to inform what you want to ‘say’ in your images, and how you have chosen to communicate it. There is a template provided (and posted on UTS online under “assignment”) to help you put together the 1000 words if you would like to use it – this format is not compulsory but may be useful to help you focus. Can I use pieces of existing images when creating my new digital image? The majority of the work you present needs to be original. However, because we accept that you may not always be the best photographer, have access to the objects, locations and situations you wish to photograph you are allowed to use images licensed under creative commons however: you cannot just simply present these works as your final product – they need to undergo a significant degree of adaption, editing or alteration. In other words, they must be a transformative work that adds something of your own that is original to it, either through combination with other images, alteration in some important way, or other creative transformation. If in doubt about what this means, please speak to your tutor who can help calibrate your expectations about originality and transformation. What are the copyright and ethics implications of using existing images or creating new images? Existing images are typically covered by copyright. This means you should not be using them without obtaining permission, unless there is an explicit license that grants you permission (such as a creative commons license). Generally, you’re much safer from a copyright point of view if you create a brand-new image (that is, if you take the picture yourself). However, there are still some things to be mindful of even in this. In particular, if you’re identifying a person, or photographing a particular sensitive place or issue, wherever possible you should ask for permission to do so. It would be a good idea to write an explanation indicating whether you have asked permission (and if not, why not, 5 and who you would need to ask if this were a professional project). Your tutor can help you with this. Hot tip – if you’re interested in sourcing copyright free, open access or creative commons images, you can use the creative commons search tool, and Google Image search also has settings to only display results that are licensed for re-use, such as creative commons. In a Google search, click on “Settings” and pick “Advanced Image Search” – scroll down to the bottom and change the ‘usage rights’ field to “Creative Commons licences”. Not completely fool proof, but a good start. There are also many sites that let you search for images that content creators have specifically given permission to use – but that’s the key part: you need to know you have permission to use it, not just assume it. How does the peer feedback part work? This will be arranged by your tutor in classes in the second half of the semester. You’ll have the opportunity to comment on more than three in-progress images made by your peers, but when it comes time to submit you will select the best three of your comments to be marked and include it in your written submission. A great tip is to take screen shots or copy+paste the text of each comment each time you post it to someone else’s WordPress – this will save you chasing up all your comments at the end! Is there anything else I need to know? Don’t forget to have a look at the marking criteria (available on UTS online and in the subject outline), as well as the rubric down below. All of the important documents, templates and other information is available on UTS online under “Assignments”. 6 17.07.2020 Rubric Assessment Criteria High Distinction standard Distinction Standard Credit standard Pass standard Fail Creativity of concepts and theories explored (20%) Demonstrates, to an excellent standard, the creative process undertaken to develop the required 3 images. The written justification consistently makes direct links between concepts and theories explored in this course and offers strong, specific detail in explaining why creative choices have been made with supporting evidence. The written response also makes it very clear why and how the presented images respond to the given brief. Demonstrates, to a very good standard, the creative process undertaken to develop the required 3 images. The written justification makes direct links between concepts and theories explored in this course and have mostly provided specific detail in explaining why creative choices have been made with supporting evidence. Only minor issues of consistency now remain, including making very clear why and how the presented images respond to the given brief. This is something that could be addressed with a little more editing of the written submission. Demonstrates, to a good standard, the creative process undertaken to develop the required 3 images. The written justification makes direct links between concepts and theories explored in this course and have begun to provide specific detail in explaining why creative choices have been made with supporting evidence. Still yet to be developed in more detail is a more consistent approach to why and how the presented images respond to the given brief, something that could be addressed with more editing of the written submission. Demonstrates, to a basic standard, the creative process undertaken to develop the required 3 images. However there remains significant work to be done on the submission of a written justification, including making much more direct links between concepts and theories explored in this course, and providing more specific detail in explaining why creative choices have been made with supporting evidence. There is a basic explanation of why and how the presented images respond to the given brief, however this still relies heavily on generalisations that need further clarification. Fails to demonstrate the creative process undertaken to develop the required 3 images. This includes the submission of a written justification that is too short; that doesn’t directly link back to concepts and theories explored in this course; and a lack of appropriate detail in explaining why creative choices have been made with supporting evidence. This misses an opportunity to explain why and how the presented images respond to the given brief, instead leaving the marker to only guess or assume possible connections. Aesthetic and technical refinement within images (20%) There is excellent evidence of aesthetic and technical refinement within the presented images. This includes consistent detail in the written submission about the processes undertaken There is very good evidence of aesthetic and technical refinement within the presented images. This includes consistent detail in the written submission about the processes undertaken There is good evidence of aesthetic and technical refinement within the presented images. This includes developing detail in the written submission about the processes undertaken There is only basic evidence of aesthetic and technical refinement within the presented images. This includes only basic detail in the written submission about the processes undertaken There is little or no evidence of aesthetic and technical refinement within the presented images. This includes no or incomplete detail in the written submission about the processes University of Technology Sydney Clarity of iterative, process-based documentation (30%) with the digital software, and an excellent level of articulation about how the images presented have been manipulated/composed. There is also very clear detail about the further refinement and/or experimentation that was made or considered with the available tools to realise the potential of the submitted work. with the digital software, and a very good level of articulation about how the images presented have been manipulated/composed. There is also mostly clear detail about the further refinement and/or experimentation that was made or considered with the available tools to realise the potential of the submitted work. The work-in-progress documentation is of an excellent standard. There is impressive clarity and appropriate detail in the explanation for the development of each iteration of the submitted work and the steps taken to achieve it, including excellent, pertinent details of both practical and conceptual development. The result is in an impressive application of both theory and practice that responds creatively and effectively to the brief. The work-in-progress documentation is of a very good standard. There is a very good level of clarity and detail in the explanation of the development and purpose of each iteration of the submitted work and the majority of the steps taken to achieve it. There are still minor issues remaining in terms of explain the practical and conceptual development, with the result still a very good application of both theory and practice that responds effectively to the brief. with the digital software, and a good level of articulation about how the images presented have been manipulated/composed. There still remains room to demonstrate more consistently what further refinement and/or experimentation was made or considered with the available tools to more fully realise the potential of the submitted work. The work-in-progress documentation is of a good standard. There is some clarity and detail in the explanation of the development and purpose of each iteration of the submitted work, and some of the steps taken to achieve it. There is still more work required to explain the practical and conceptual development, with a somewhat mixed or uneven application of both theory and practice that responds to the brief. with the digital software, and much more nuance needed when articulating how the images presented have been manipulated/composed. There still remains substantial room to demonstrate what further refinement and/or experimentation was made or considered with the available tools to more fully realise the potential of the submitted work. The work-in-progress documentation is of a satisfactory standard. There is a minimal attempt at clearly explaining the purpose of each iteration of the submitted work, with only some evidence of development. There is still much more work required to explain or provide evidence for the practical and conceptual development, with a partial or incomplete application of both theory and practice that responds to the brief in a minimal, uncreative or unimaginative way. undertaken with the digital software, specifically articulating how the images presented have been manipulated/composed. The submission still needs to demonstrate what further refinement and/or experimentation was made or considered with the available tools to more fully realise the potential of the submitted work. There is little or no evidence of work-inprogress documentation submitted, or a lack of any clear explanation of the purpose of each iteration, or no evidence of development. Documentation that is provided may bear little or no relevance to the images and the process of their development, may be much too short, inappropriate, or otherwise incomplete. The work does not respond effectively to the brief in a satisfactory way. UTS CRICOS 00099F Critical reflection on ethical aspects of production (15%) Images sourced from elsewhere are attributed or referenced accurately and appropriately for the requirements of the relevant license. The exegesis includes a detailed critical reflection on copyright, privacy or other ethical issues around digital image creation with superb relevance to the submitted work. Images sourced from elsewhere are attributed or referenced. The exegesis includes a good reflection on copyright, privacy or other ethical issues around digital image creation substantially relevant to the submitted work. Images sourced from elsewhere are attributed or referenced with minor errors or omissions. The exegesis includes some reflection on copyright, privacy or other ethical issues around digital image creation and is mostly relevant to the submitted work, but more detail or direct relevance may be possible. Images sourced from elsewhere are only minimally or incorrectly attributed or referenced. There is a cursory reflection on copyright, privacy or other ethical issues around digital image creation with some relevance to the submitted work but much more detail or connection may be possible. Images sourced from elsewhere are not attributed or referenced in any fashion, or are used entirely without permission. There may be no reflection on copyright, privacy or other ethical issues around digital image creation, or the reflection may have no relevance to the submitted work. Depth of engagement in peer feedback (15%) The peer feedback that is provided is excellent. There is not only significant critical engagement with the concepts explored throughout the course but these concepts have been critiqued and extended. Considered, detailed feedback has been provided to peers with clear applicability to the project. Peer feedback has also been incorporated into the iteration of their own images. The peer feedback that is provided is very good. There is significant engagement with the concepts explored throughout the course and considered, detailed and applicable feedback has been provided to peers. Some peer feedback has also been integrated into their own iteration of their images. The peer feedback that is provided is good. There is some basic engagement with the concepts explored throughout the course and a good effort has been made to provide considered, detailed feedback to peers. There may be some evidence of peer feedback integrated into their own images. The peer feedback that is provided is satisfactory. There may be minimal engagement with the concepts and/or technical aspects of image production explored throughout the course but an effort has been made to provide considered feedback to peers. There is no peer feedback provided, or what is provided in incomplete, inappropriate or inadequate. This includes submissions that have made less than the three prescribed comments, and those that do not obviously make feedback that a peer could action or consider. UTS CRICOS 00099F 10.09.2020 54001 Digital Literacies – Ethics Q&A I have found something on google images, saved a copy, used it in my image, and attributed it in my reference list. Is that enough? Do you know who took the image? Did the creator explicitly give you permission to use the image? If no, or you’re not sure – no! Don’t use it, find an alternative. I want to use the logo from the organisation I am doing A2 for – can I use it if I reference it? For the purposes of this assignment, we’ll make an exception here. If you are working for an org we can assume that they would let you use their logo – but only their logo. If you want to change, alter or in any way use the logo of another company then no. Assume that you only ought to use the organisation’s logo in a way that is consistent with what the organisation agrees with (e.g. you can’t use the Cadbury’s logo in a piece for Fitness First – we can’t assume permission here!) I’ve done a search on Creative Commons and found an image that says it can be used with attribution, but no modification is allowed. Can I just change it a bit and use? No! ‘No modification’ means ‘you can’t modify this image’ – you need to obey the requirements of the license. I’ve taken a picture myself and uploaded it, but that’s it – maybe added one line of text. Is that enough/ethical for this assignment? Not exactly. Would your organisation want your bare minimum? Look at the criteria about modification. If you want to get more than a bare pass for that criteria you need to show you have done a reasonable degree of digital manipulation to improve and refine your image. Besides, if the message they wanted to convey could be done by just a plain old photo, why would they have hired you instead of just a photographer? Think about what expertise you can add. I’ve taken a picture with a person in it and their face is visible (i.e. clearly identifiable) – is that ethical? Did you ask their permission, and explain how their picture/image/face was going to be used? Did you know at the time you took it how their image would be used? In other words, did the subject of your image have what is known as “free, prior and informed consent”? This is a principle based in the UN human rights framework – particularly important for indigenous peoples, and for projects with big potential impacts, but it is a standard worth upholding for everybody as much as possible. See pages 15 and 16 here in particular. ‘Free’ means the person is free to give or withhold their consent without being coerced or pressured into it, ‘prior’ means not asking for permission ‘after the fact’ but beforehand, and ‘informed’ University of Technology Sydney means making sure they actually know what they’re agreeing to – these are simple but powerful basic principles that allow us to uphold other people’s rights, and treat them with dignity and respect. So what can I do instead? Can I even use an image of a person at all? You can! You just need to think carefully about how to go about it ethically – ask yourself ‘what ought I do?’ Would you want your picture taken, and manipulated, without your knowledge? You can always take a picture of yourself, or someone who has given you their free, prior and informed consent to use their image – but you should always ask and get permission, or alternatively, if you absolutely have to use an image with a person in it, de-identify them in it. This can be done in a variety of creative ways that support your visual communication, e.g. through cropping, blurring faces and other identifiable details, or other imaginative ways. Talk to your tutor if you’re not sure. There are tiny people in my background of my image – is that OK? Sounds like it might be – there’s no hard and fast rule around whether someone is or isn’t identifiable, so use your judgment, or ask a friend/your tutor. Perhaps one of your peers might be able to help you confirm whether someone seems ‘identifiable’ to them? I want to use an image from someone else’s social media (i.e. Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, etc). Can I take a screenshot, or just download it and use it? From a legal standpoint, most social media platforms own or at least have a license to the content uploaded to it in order to facilitate the business of that site. For instance, Instagram’s terms of service requires that users grant it a “non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use their content” (see here for some more details and caveats). What does this mean? That Instagram can use the images uploaded to it, but not you. Unless you are the person who originally took the image and uploaded it to Instagram, their terms of service don’t give you any permissions. Beyond that though – don’t just think about what you can do, but what your ought to do! Would you want someone else using your post used without permission? You can always ask the original photographer/uploader directly (via email, dm, etc. if you can find it) or, better yet, see if you can recreate the image yourself, or find a replacement you do have permission to re-use. UTS CRICOS 00099F ASSIGNMENT TWO: DIGITAL PUBLISHING PRODUCTION TEMPLATE NOTE: This template is a sample layout for how you might want to structure your Assignment two Turnitin submission. You don’t have to use it, but we strongly recommend it to help you format for submission. You are expected to post your work to your Wordpress site, so use what you have already produced to populate this template. Remember – you need 3 images plus 1000 words justification, plus evidence (screenshot or copy+paste) of 3 x 150 word comments you provided for other people’s posts, as well as at least 5 academic references in total. You can remove this box from the template before submission. NOTE – there is a size limit of 20MB Turnitin submissions – large image files might push you over the edge. You can provide smaller versions of your images in this template, and link to the full resolution versions on your Wordpress if you are finding this final document is too large to submit. 1 Assignment two: “An organisation related to your discipline has commissioned you to produce three digital images for a communications campaign about digital literacy” INTRODUCTION [50-100 words] Provide a short introduction outlining what organisation relating to your discipline you have chosen to work for, and what digital literacy concept pairs you have used for your three images. For example, it might be “Three images for The Live Music Office for a campaign about mobile/mobility”. IMAGE 1 [300 words] Provide a short description of your final Image 1 and its purpose in terms of meeting the brief – what were you trying to communicate visually with this image, and for what audience is it intended? Describe how the image was created referencing specific techniques and tools that you used, what compositional choices you made, and what digital & visual literacies are assumed. Include details of the choices you made while developing your final image, including examples of drafts or works in progress as description and/or examples. You can give links to them from your Wordpress site if you prefer, or you can include early versions and draft images here. 2 State where the components of your image have come from, and why you have permission to use them (e.g. “they are all my own source images” or “one part of the image is licensed under creative commons”). Reflect on what ‘worked’ about earlier drafts of your image, including any versions of them that you developed and drafted along the way. You should discuss what needed improving about these earlier attempts, and how you incorporated feedback from tutor and peers. Here is also where you should clearly align your choices to the required academic readings – you need to show how AT LEAST 5 academic sources have informed your creative and technical choices to achieve your visual communication across the three images. IMAGE 2 [300 words] 3 Provide a short description of your final Image 2 and its purpose in terms of meeting the brief – what were you trying to communicate visually with this image, and for what audience is it intended? Describe how the image was created referencing specific techniques and tools that you used, what compositional choices you made, and what digital & visual literacies are assumed. Include details of the choices you made while developing your final image, including examples of drafts or works in progress as description and/or examples. You can give links to them from your Wordpress site if you prefer, or you can include early versions and draft images here. State where the components of your image have come from, and why you have permission to use them (e.g. “they are all my own source images” or “one part of the image is licensed under creative commons”). Reflect on what ‘worked’ about earlier drafts of your image, including any versions of them that you developed and drafted along the way. You should discuss what needed improving about these earlier attempts, and how you incorporated feedback from tutor and peers. Here is also where you should clearly align your choices to the required academic readings – you need to show how AT LEAST 5 academic sources have informed your creative and technical choices to achieve your visual communication across the three images. 4 IMAGE 3 [300 words] Provide a short description of your final Image 1 and its purpose in terms of meeting the brief – what were you trying to communicate visually with this image, and for what audience is it intended? Describe how the image was created referencing specific techniques and tools that you used, what compositional choices you made, and what digital & visual literacies are assumed. Include details of the choices you made while developing your final image, including examples of drafts or works in progress as description and/or examples. You can give links to them from your Wordpress site if you prefer, or you can include early versions and draft images here. State where the components of your image have come from, and why you have permission to use them (e.g. “they are all my own source images” or “one part of the image is licensed under creative commons”). 5 Reflect on what ‘worked’ about earlier drafts of your image, including any versions of them that you developed and drafted along the way. You should discuss what needed improving about these earlier attempts, and how you incorporated feedback from tutor and peers. Here is also where you should clearly align your choices to the required academic readings – you need to show how AT LEAST 5 academic sources have informed your creative and technical choices to achieve your visual communication across the three images. ETHICAL REFLECTION ON USE OF IMAGES (50-100 words) Include a final statement about the ethical use and manipulation of images, where any non-original material was sourced, what clearance or permissions were needed, any other appropriate acknowledgments, any other final remarks. COMMENTS ON PEER BLOGS: (3x 150 words – NOTE: these don’t count towards the 1000 words) ADD 3x 150 WORD COMMENTS ON PEER WORK AS IMAGE FILES/SCREEN CAP OR PLAIN TEXT. REFERENCES: (this list at the end doesn’t count towards your 1000 word limit) Professor, A. (2016), ‘A new understanding of changes our industry’, The Journal of Underwater Basket Weaving, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 54-60. Professor, B. (2016), ‘A new understanding of changes our industry’, The Journal of Underwater Basket Weaving, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 54-60. Professor, C. (2016), ‘A new understanding of changes our industry’, The Journal of Underwater Basket Weaving, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 54-60. Professor, D. (2016), ‘A new understanding of changes our industry’, The Journal of Underwater Basket Weaving, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 54-60. Professor, E. (2016), ‘A new understanding of changes our industry’, The Journal of Underwater Basket Weaving, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 54-60. 6 Considering Copyright and Ethics in A2 This document should be used as a guide when considering the images you want to include in your A2 compositions. We want you to work as if you were in a professional context, therefore only using materials that would be available to professional organisations under Copyright law in Australia. The only copyrighted image you can use in this instance is the organisation’s logo (as outlined in the Brief). This document is not exhaustive, and you should conduct your own research into issues of image production and composition to support your written reflection. Finding Creative Commons Licenced Materials Understanding Creative Commons in Australia Creative Commons Search Flickr Open Photo Pexels PhotoPin Pixabay Trove – National Library of Australia UnSplash Wikimedia Commons Ethical Considerations of Taking Images Yourself Taking images of children Taking Photographs in Public Spaces Australian Copyright Council Resources What do I have to do if I am using someone else’s images or text to create new works? What are Moral Rights? UTS Harvard Referencing UTS Harvard Guide (Interactive) Sound, Film and Image Using Images from Social Media sites Ask a Librarian Other Helpful Resources Can I Use That Picture Infographic
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Explanation & Answer

Attached.

Running head: DIGITAL LITERACY.

1

Communications Campaign About Digital Literacy.
Student's Name.
Institutional Affiliation(s).

DIGITAL LITERACY.

2

Introduction.
The International Telecommunication Union, ITU, is a specialized agency in the United
Nations union that deals with information and communication technologies based in Geneva,
Switzerland. Its mandate is based on the commitment to ensuring that people are well connected
worldwide wherever they live and regardless of their means. It is obliged to ensure that
protection is placed to ensure the fundamental right to communicate is preserved. Through these,
the three images chosen to be used are based on the ITU's campaign on access/divide based on
digital literacy.
Image 1.

(Source: unsplash.com and worldliteracyfoundation.org)
The purpose of the image is close to self-explanatory. The idea behind the image is to
convey the message that people need to be connected over the internet in many ways and for
many reasons, especially in the contemporary world. It means that regardless of where one is

DIGITAL LITERACY.

3

across the world, they need to be interconnected for communication. However, this has never
been the case per se due to some countries' inability, especially the developing countries lacking
the proper infrastructure needed to make this dream valid. The target audience is the general
public backed by ITU, which promotes the need to have information communication technology
spreading far and beyond. The image was created by using two different images. The one with
the girl sitting down with a laptop was used first, and the latter was i...


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