CUNY Lehman College Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations Research

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CUNY Lehman College

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Learning Objective: Strategic Leadership

Relevant Chapter/Article: Read case Century Hospital Need for Change and motivation articles

  • Century Hospital Case
  • If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts
  • Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude

You are now placed in the role of a manager. As a Manager, you help shape people’s daily work experience. You have the opportunity to discover what makes them tick. What are their talents? Their values? Their goals? If you can unlock the passion and potential of every person on your team, they will choose to give 110%. When that happens, everyone wins.

Reference Section: Cite your work correctly

In general, you need to cite sources any time, and every time you use someone else's words to answer a question, write a paper or presentation, and post on a discussion board.

1. What type of source am I trying to cite? Journal article? Book? Webpage?

2. Where did I retrieve that source? Library database? Website? Was it a print source?

3. What citation style am I supposed to use for my assignment?

APA or MLA? For this class, you are required to use APA.

Follow these simple rules. You must cite a reference when you:

  • Discuss, summarize, or paraphrase the ideas of an author
  • Provide a direct quotation
  • Use statistical or other data.
  • Use images, graphics, videos, and other media

The following link can help you organize the correct way to cite your work APA

https://www.calvin.edu/library/knightcite/index.ph...

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Double space seven times to start the title page BEFORE YOU GO ANY FURTHER 1. The text and the page numbers in the header are Times New Roman 12 point font. 2. The margins are one inch all around. 3. The spacing is double space. 4. Go into the paragraph tab and check off the box “do not add space to paragraphs of the same style. 5. Go into the paragraph tab, then the tabs and clear all the tabs and the default tab is set to one-half inch. Paper Title 6. The margins are left flush. Student Name Lehman College City University of New York Department of Health Science Noel Ruiz, DHSc, MPA Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations Century Hospital Strategic Leadership Date INSERT A PAGE BREAK TO SEPARATE THE TITLE PAGE FROM THE PAPER NOTE: Page numbers begin on page 2 – use the page number tool 2 Introduction Introduction should be a one or two paragraph explanation of the assignment and the focus of the paper. The paper should include 4 pages of content not including the title or reference page. It is important to select under the page layout tool the correct margins template with 1-inch margins all sides and to check that the auto indent and spacing before and after is set at 0 pt and under paragraph double spacing is selected. In academia, it is traditional to use the third person when writing papers and not to use “I or we” and this is to be followed for the weekly written assignments except in the recommendations section of the paper. Keep the following titles/themes: 1. What are the main issues Beverly is facing? 2. What actions could she take to improve strategic thinking and strategic management at the hospital? 3. What stakeholder issues should she immediately address? 4. What changes could she make over the short term to refocus the organization and achieve quick wins? 5. How can Beverly motivate her employees? Conclusion The conclusion is a summary which hshould include the major issues discussed in the paper and is 1-2 paragraphs in length. Reference citations are not used in this section because no new information should be added since the summary is based on the analysis of information from the readings and references contained in the discussion section. 3 References (title is NOT bold) Samples below only list referenced cited in the paper and include required readings Abbot. (2009, March 24). Abbot advances its revolutionary fully bioabsorbable drug eluting stent with initiation of next phase of clinical trial [Press release]. Retrieved from Press release, p. 186 http://www.abbott.com/global/url/pressRelease/en_US/Press_Release_0715.htm American College of Physicians. (2010). Internists and physician assistants: Team-based primary care [Monograph]. Philadelphia, PA: Author. Report, p. 205-7.03, p. 206, no. 32-34 American Heart Association. (2011, March 29). Overweight in children. Retrieved from http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/Overweight-inChildren_UCM_304054_Article.jsp Professional organization Web site American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Book, pp. 200-203 Behavioral problems in children. (2012). In P. M. Paulman, J. D. Harrison, A. Paulman, L. S. Nasir, & D. S. Collier (Eds.), Signs and symptoms in family medicine. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders. Chapter in a book with no designated chapter author, p. 203 Bogdanich, W. (2010, January 26). As technology surges, radiation safeguards lag. The New York Times. Retrieved from Newspaper, p. 200, no. 10-11 http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/27/us/27radiation.html?ref=radiation_boom&pagewant Carbohydrates: Good carbs guide the way. (n.d.). Harvard School of Public Health. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/carbohydratesfull-story/ Newsletter, p. 200, no. 9 4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011a, April 21) A growing problem. In Overweight and obesity. Retrieved from Governmental agency Web site http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/problem.html Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011b, August 1). Diabetes: Successes and opportunities for population-based prevention and control. In Chronic disease prevention and health promotion. Retrieved from Governmental agency Web site http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/ddt.htm Colledge, N. R. (2010). Delirium. In N. R. Colledge, B. R. Walker, & S. H. Ralston (Eds.), Davidson’s principles & practice of medicine (21st ed., pp. 171-172). Philadelphia, PA: Churchill Livingstone. Chapter in a book with a chapter author, p. 202 Cooper, R., Cutler, J., Desvigne-Nickens, P., Fortmann, S. P., Friedman, L., Havlik, R., . . . Thom, T. (2000). Trends and disparities in coronary heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in the United States: Findings of the National Conference on Cardiovascular Disease prevention. Circulation, 102, 3137-3147. doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.102.25.3171 Journal article with more than seven authors, p. 198 Dangas, G., & Kuepper, F. (2002). Restenosis: Repeat narrowing of a coronary artery. Circulation, 105, 2586-2587. doi 10.1161/01.CIR.0000019122.00032.DF Davis, N., Forbes, B., & Wylie-Rosett, J. (2009). Nutritional strategies in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, 76(3), 257-268. doi 10.1002/msj.20118 Dinger, J. C., Cronin, M., Mohner, S., Schellschmidt, I., Minh, T. D., & Westhoff, C. (2009). Oral contraceptive effectiveness according to body mass index, weight, age, and other factors. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 201(3), 263.e1-263.e9. Retrieved from http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(09)00272-5/abstract Journal article, p. 198  Two authors Three authors Six authors 5 Hall, L. (2010, October 11). 3 weird recent discoveries about obesity. The Orange County Register. Retrieved from http://healthyliving.ocregister.com/2010/10/11/3-weird-recentdiscoveries-about-obesity/24500/ Newspaper, p. 202, no. 10-11 Hutchinson, M. R., & Ireland, M. L. (2003). Overuse and throwing injuries in the skeletally immature athlete. Instructional Course Lectures, 52, 25-36. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12690838 Journal article, p. 198 Leadership. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/leadership Word from a reference book, p. 205, no 30 Leung, L. L. K. (2011, June, 6). Anticoagulants other than heparin and warfarin. Retrieved from http://www.uptodate.com/...tents/anticoagulants-other-than-heparin-andCorporate Web site warfarin?source=search_result&search=anticoagulants+ other+than+heparin+and+warfarin&selectedTitle=1~150 McCulloch, D. K. (2011, June 16). Thiazolidinediones in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Retrieved from http://www.uptodate.com/...nes-in-the-treatment-of-diabetesmellitus?source=search_result&search=Thiazolidinediones+in+the+Treatment+of+Diabe tes+Mellitus&selectedTitle=1~150 Corporate Web site Onyike, C. U., Crum, R. M., Lee, H. B., Lyketsos, C. G., & Eaton, W. W. (2003). Is obesity associated with major depression? Results from the third national health and nutrition examination survey. American Journal of Epidemiology, 158(12), 1139-1147. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14652298 Journal article, p. 198 Seldin, P. (2009). The academic portfolio: A new and more effective way to document teaching, research, and service [PowerPoint presentation]. Retrieved from no13_2009forum_report02_2_2.pdf Unpublished works, p 211-7.09 and p. 212-7.10 6 Weil, W. M. (2011, October). Evaluation and treatment of disorders of the hand. In S. S. Koo Symposium, pp. 206-207 (Course Director), Orthopedics symposium for the primary-care physician. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Swedish Continuing Medical Education, Seattle, WA. Thorp, C. M. (2008). Pharmacology for the health care professions. Hoboken, NJ: WileyBlackwell. Book , p. 202 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Heart, p. 205, no 31 Lung, and Blood Institute. (2011, February, 1). What are coronary heart disease risk factors? Retrieved from http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hd/ Government agency sponsored by a dept of the government Weaver, C. (2008). Grammar to enrich & enhance writing. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. What is metabolic syndrome? (n.d.). In Metabolic syndrome health center. Retrieved from No author or date, p. 200, no 9 http://www.webmd.com/heart/metabolic-syndrome/metabolic-syndrome-what-is-it Corporate Web site Wilensky, G. (2009, November 12). Don’t forget about the other determinants of health. Kaiser Health News. Retrieved from http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Columns/2009/ November/ 111209Wilensky.aspx?referrer=search Newsletter, p. 200, no. 9 Wang, C., & Swerdloff, R. S. (2011, September 16). Patient information: Treatment of male infertility. Retrieved from http://www.uptodate.com/contents/patient-informationtreatment-of-male-infertility Corporate Web site Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations Professor Ruiz Week 14 Case Review Strategic Leadership Century Hospital need for change Beverly long CEO of century hospital just got a promotion she previously worked in a consulting firm that had done turnaround consulting at struggling hospitals. Her work was recognized in many journals, and when Century Hospitals board of trustees needed a new CEO to bring about radical change, it offered the job to Beverly. Century Hospital is a 500-bed acute care hospital in the southeastern region of the United States. Its mission is to provide care for the poor and underprivileged. However, in the past two decades, the hospital constructed a new facility and feeder clinics around its affluent suburban areas. An ex-military officer had run the hospital for the past 15 years, and decisions were highly centralized. He authorized all new hires and replacements and non-routine purchases of more than $10,000. The centralization of decisions slowed actions and inhibited innovation. However, until recently, the hospital prospered and consistently earned high returns. In the past few years, new organizations entering Century's market have eroded the hospital's profits. Physician specialty hospitals, national physician clinics, surgery centers, and other new services have attracted many century hospital patients. The hospital's operating margin dropped to just one point, 8% before the previous CEO retired. The board of trustees is concerned about the future of the hospital. In recent years, state legislators have discussed taxing not for profit hospitals that earn too much money. The board also is questioning whether century is meeting its mission, given his location in one of the most affluent areas in the region. Recent staff surveys suggest that many employees are not satisfied with their jobs, which may have contributed to the current high turnover. As one employee wrote Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations Professor Ruiz Week 14 Case Review Strategic Leadership at the end of the survey, "I thought I was getting out of a dysfunctional culture when I left the army. Little did I know that yelling and extreme bureaucracies exist outside of the military. Century culture needs an extreme overhaul period." Into this situation walked Beverly long period after three months of mostly observing and noting problems, she believes she is ready to develop a plan of action. Questions 1. What are the main issues Beverly is facing? 2. What actions could she take to improve strategic thinking and strategic management at the hospital? 3. What stakeholder issues should she immediately address? 4. What changes could she make over the short term to refocus the organization and achieve quick wins? 5. How can Beverly motivate her employees? Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude https://hbr.org/2017/03/motivating-people-starts-with-having-the-ri... LEADING TEAMS Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude by Monique Valcour MARCH 01, 2017 Most leaders know what strong motivation looks like. When I ask leadership development clients to describe the type of motivation they’d like to see in their teams, they mention qualities such as persistence, being a self-starter, having a sense of accountability for and commitment to achieving results, and being willing to go the extra mile on projects or to help other team members. But many leaders have little idea of how to boost or sustain that level of motivation. 1 of 5 8/26/19, 9:21 PM Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude https://hbr.org/2017/03/motivating-people-starts-with-having-the-ri... Many leaders don’t understand that they are an integral part of the motivational ecosystem in their companies. The motivational qualities listed above appear most frequently when employees feel valued, trusted, challenged, and supported in their work — all things that leaders can influence. For better or worse, leaders’ attitudes and behaviors have a huge effect on employees’ drive and capacity to perform. One problem that gets in the way is a mechanistic, instrumental view of the human beings who sit at our companies’ desks. Seeing compensation as the primary or only tool we can use to motivate high performance is like trying to build a house with only a hammer. What gets lost is that incentives, regardless of which ones are applied, filter through employees’ brains along with every other aspect of the employment experience. How employees experience work from day to day has a bigger influence on their motivation than their compensation and benefits package. Another barrier to a leader’s capacity to motivate RELATED VIDEO is the widespread, mistaken belief that motivation is an inherent property of the employee — “they either have it or they don’t.” In fact, motivation is a dynamic process, not a stable employee characteristic. When we judge an employee to be irredeemably unmotivated, we give up on trying to motivate them. A vicious cycle ensues, in which our attitude and behaviors 9 Employee Engagement Archetypes You can't engage employees if you don't know what motivates them.  Save  Share elicit exactly those behaviors we expect from an unmotivated employee, which in turn reinforces and justifies our verdict and approach. Everybody loses: The organization is deprived of the SEE MORE VIDEOS > employee’s full contribution, the leader acts unskillfully, and the employee grows increasingly disengaged. Managers generally start out with the best of intentions. After all, whenever we hire someone new, we expect that they will be motivated. Later, if performance or engagement lags, we experience frustration at the “unmotivated, entitled” employee. It often goes something like this: “As a leader, I 2 of 5 8/26/19, 9:21 PM Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude https://hbr.org/2017/03/motivating-people-starts-with-having-the-ri... started out caring very much about the emotional needs of staff. Unfortunately, all this brought about was overentitlement and making it OK to use your feelings to waste time and create a negative environment. I have evolved to care less about feelings and more about getting the work done, period. As long as my expectations are clear, people get paid, and they have a safe environment, there is no room for the rest of it in the workplace.” I found this comment on a leadership article posted on the HBR Facebook page, but it could have come from the mouths of the countless leaders I’ve met during my career. Even if a leader feels perfectly justified in taking this approach, giving the impression that employees’ subjective experience of work doesn’t matter will only serve to dampen employee motivation. It is entirely possible for leaders to learn to motivate even those employees they’ve given up on. As an example, I recently coached a leader who’s responsible for a global organization’s operations in an Eastern European country. A man in his fifties with a military background, he complained of being saddled with an underperforming team member he couldn’t fire: “He’s basically useless. All I can do is contain him so he doesn’t screw anything up — and lean on my capable people to get our work done.” The leader gave the employee routine, low-value work to do, didn’t share important information with him, didn’t bother to meet with him, and never sought his input or contribution to important projects. “Why bother with him? I can’t change him, and I don’t have time to waste on someone who’s unmotivated,” he insisted at first. Through coaching, the leader came to appreciate that these choices, which he initially saw as rational responses to a motivational deficiency in the employee, actually worsened the problem. He realized that seeing his employee as useless was only one of many possible perspectives he could take — and that it limited his leadership effectiveness. After shifting his approach from containment to facilitation, he saw substantial gains in the employee’s outward motivation and performance, to the point where the employee became a valuable member of the team. To make the shift that boosted his employee’s motivation, this leader had to be fearless in examining his own thinking and patterns of behavior. He recognized and admitted that he didn’t see his employee as a whole human being, but rather as an object and a problem. He had to develop curiosity about what the situation was like from the employee’s point of view. He had to experience that valuing his employee’s perspective opened up avenues for motivation. As he started talking more with his employee, giving him challenging work, seeking his input, and including him in important projects, the employee responded with increased enthusiasm and commitment. “I can’t 3 of 5 8/26/19, 9:21 PM Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude https://hbr.org/2017/03/motivating-people-starts-with-having-the-ri... believe what a difference it makes,” he told me after a few sessions. I believe that most interpersonal problems that arise in the world, whether in relationships, companies, or nations, come down to the fundamental difficulty humans have in seeing things from others’ perspectives. When we make assumptions about what employees believe and value, interpreting their behaviors according to our assumptions, we reduce their humanity and their complexity. The very phrase “human resources” frames employees as material to be deployed for organizational objectives. While the essential nature of employment contracts involves trading labor for remuneration, if we fail to see and appreciate our employees as whole people, efforts to motivate them will meet with limited success. Instead of thinking about how we can control our employees, let’s focus on how we can motivate them. A good place to start is by reflecting on the best boss you’ve ever had. How did this boss make you feel? What did this boss do to earn your admiration? Try to harvest some of that boss’s motivational strategies and make them your own. Monique Valcour is an executive coach, keynote speaker, and management professor. She helps clients create and sustain fulfilling and high-performance jobs, careers, workplaces, and lives. Follow her on Twitter @moniquevalcour. This article is about LEADING TEAMS  Follow This Topic Related Topics: Motivating People Comments Leave a Comment Post Comment 4 of 5 8/26/19, 9:21 PM Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude 29 COMMENTS Clement Gavi https://hbr.org/2017/03/motivating-people-starts-with-having-the-ri... 2 years ago 'Think about your own experience and what motivated you when you were in the lower levels of a company. Who was the best boss you ever had? What did that person do to make you want to perform at your best? Reflect on what made your boss’s motivational strategies so effective for you. What specifically did they do to earn your trust and admiration? Now think about how you can apply those lessons to your own team. Which motivational tools will work for them?' These wonderful words remind the concept of extrapolate. For, extrapolating is trying to elaborate, via possible experience, what is given in another experiment.  Reply 00  Join The Conversation POSTING GUIDELINES We hope the conversations that take place on HBR.org will be energetic, constructive, and thought-provoking. To comment, readers must sign in or register. And to ensure the quality of the discussion, our moderating team will review all comments and may edit them for clarity, length, and relevance. Comments that are overly promotional, mean-spirited, or off-topic may be deleted per the moderators' judgment. All postings become the property of Harvard Business Publishing. 5 of 5 8/26/19, 9:21 PM If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts https://hbr.org/2017/02/if-you-want-to-motivate-employees-stop-tru... MOTIVATING PEOPLE If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts by Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Lewis Garrad FEBRUARY 08, 2017 Few topics have received more attention in talent management than motivation, defined as the deliberate attempt to influence employees’ behaviors with the goal of enhancing their performance, and in turn their organizational effectiveness. Indeed, other than talent, motivation is the key driver of job performance, for it determines the level of effort and persistence employees will exert. It is also clear that top performers tend to stand out as much for their motivation as for their talents. 1 of 5 8/26/19, 9:26 PM If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts https://hbr.org/2017/02/if-you-want-to-motivate-employees-stop-tru... However, while the science of motivation is robust and well-established, it is rarely applied to realworld management practices, which tend to be based on managers’ intuition and subjective experience. This is perhaps why Peter Drucker famously lamented that “we know nothing about motivation — all we can do is write books about it.” A global survey of more than 50 Fortune 1000 companies and 1.2 million employees showed that in a whopping 85% of organizations — remember, these are some of the best companies in the world — employee motivation declines sharply after people have spent six months with their managers. In other words, most employees are enthusiastic and engaged when they start their new jobs, but it takes only a few months for managers to destroy their morale. This is consistent with studies indicating that managers play a critical role in determining employee engagement, and disengagement. And yet the solution is surprisingly simple: If you want to motivate employees, stop following your instincts and adopt a data-driven approach. In other words, approach motivation as a science rather than as an art, not least because very few individuals, including managers, are naturally good at motivating people. This process starts by acknowledging the flaws of common motivational practices and challenging their underlying myths with actual evidence. Why do most motivational practices fail? In our view, there are four major reasons: A simplistic approach to goal setting. While goal setting is a well-researched technique for driving motivation and performance, it is not as simple as practitioners assume. For instance, research shows that stretch goals (ambitious targets) work well when the job is transactional and inputs and outcomes can be precisely defined. In contrast, when motivating someone who is working on a complex, intellectual, or creative task, asking people to “do their best” will produce better results. Furthermore, goals tend to be tied to external incentives, but these have been shown to reduce motivation and performance when employees are intrinsically motivated to accomplish the task. Biased evaluations of performance. Most managers seem to have a natural proclivity to reward employees who are like them, perhaps as an indirect and legitimate way to admire themselves (a sort of narcissism by proxy). This leads to distorted evaluations of performance, harms diversity, and creates an unfair and highly political climate. Even when the employees favored by managers 2 of 5 8/26/19, 9:26 PM If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts https://hbr.org/2017/02/if-you-want-to-motivate-employees-stop-tru... are indeed high-performers or high-potentials, employees who are not fortunate enough to fit their “type” will feel discouraged and underperform. If managers become aware of this in-group bias, they will be more motivated to seek objective data to evaluate their employees’ potential and performance. What they will probably realize, then, is that the overlap between the most effective and likable employees is much smaller than they thought. In fact, there is often a negative correlation between a person’s talent and their likability, not least because talentless people are often quite good at faking competence. The boring nature of work. While creating distinct goals and accountabilities has helped organizations divide work into specific, measurable, and predictable components, that form of scientific management has also made jobs more repetitive and boring. This is problematic because motivation is primarily fueled by the intrinsic value that employees see in the work itself. In fact, research tells us that extrinsic rewards (like money) do little to help buffer against demoralizing or dull tasks, and psychologists have shown that while challenging work can be exciting and motivating, demanding or boring work is draining no matter what. So, while many managers see their role as motivating people through pep talks, inspirational speeches, or pizza parties, the reality is that the best way a leader can drive motivation is by designing jobs well and putting people in the right roles. This means paying close attention to the functional and psychological characteristics of the job, ensuring that it fulfills each employee’s basic drivers, and helping each person to achieve something they see as meaningful. In a way, motivating a team is as much about managing personalities as anything else. Useless feedback. There is an astonishing gap between the vast academic evidence for the importance of accurate, constructive feedback as a critical driver of motivation and performance and the poor quality of feedback most employees receive at work. Indeed, many feedback interventions actually demotivate people, even when the focus is on positive aspects of performance. For example, while it’s tempting to encourage people to focus on their strengths, there are substantial benefits to identifying one’s flaws and performance gaps — how else can we get better? On the flip side, a boss who is overly critical or demanding becomes tiresome, and no amount of money can make up for that. Finally, while technology and data analytics are revolutionizing many business functions, HR practices tend to lag behind. The tendency for managers to use their instincts and intuition, rather than data and science, is ubiquitous and limits real progress in improving managerial performance. Perhaps in the future, technology will be a more effective management tool than human managers. Until then, motivating and engaging people to solve complex problems with creative ideas will be a 3 of 5 8/26/19, 9:26 PM If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts https://hbr.org/2017/02/if-you-want-to-motivate-employees-stop-tru... critical differentiator between human employees and their nonhuman rivals. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is the Chief Talent Scientist at ManpowerGroup, a professor of business psychology at University College London and at Columbia University, and an associate at Harvard’s Entrepreneurial Finance Lab. He’s the author of Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders? (And How to Fix It). Find him on Twitter: @drtcp or at www.drtomas.com. Lewis Garrad, a chartered organizational psychologist, is the Growth Markets lead for Mercer | Sirota, an employee research specialist. He is focused on the design and deployment of employee attitude research programs, talent assessment, and performance interventions. Find him on Twitter: @lewisgarrad This article is about MOTIVATING PEOPLE  Follow This Topic Comments Leave a Comment Post Comment 10 COMMENTS GRAHAME GERSTENBERG 3 years ago Thank you for sharing your research and thoughts. I can't buy into the fantasy that technology will be a more effective management tool than human beings. The notion that we abrogate our accountability (as human beings) to technology when dealing with other human beings leaves me sad - but not bereft.  Reply 4 of 5 00 8/26/19, 9:26 PM If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts  https://hbr.org/2017/02/if-you-want-to-motivate-employees-stop-tru... Join The Conversation POSTING GUIDELINES We hope the conversations that take place on HBR.org will be energetic, constructive, and thought-provoking. To comment, readers must sign in or register. And to ensure the quality of the discussion, our moderating team will review all comments and may edit them for clarity, length, and relevance. Comments that are overly promotional, mean-spirited, or off-topic may be deleted per the moderators' judgment. All postings become the property of Harvard Business Publishing. 5 of 5 8/26/19, 9:26 PM
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Student Name
Lehman College
City University of New York
Department of Health Science
Noel Ruiz, DHSc, MPA
Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations
Century Hospital Strategic Leadership
Date
➢ Introduction
➢ Main issues Beverly is facing
➢ Actions she Could take to improve strategic thinking and strategic management
➢ Stakeholder issues should she immediately address
➢ Changes she could make over the short term
➢ How Beverly Can motivate her employees
➢ Conclusion


Student Name
Lehman College
City University of New York
Department of Health Science
Noel Ruiz, DHSc, MPA
Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations
Century Hospital Strategic Leadership
Date

CENTURY HOSPITAL NEED FOR CHANGE

2

Introduction
Beverly has recently been appointed the CEO of the troubled Century Hospitals. The
organization is facing a crisis due to a decline in profits, a high level of employee dissatisfaction,
high rate of employee turnover, and a shift from their strategic mission. Additionally, Century
Hospital is unable to deal with new competitors while employees are increasingly becoming
dissatisfied with their job. The primary goal of this task is to help Beverly to develop effective
ways to motivate employees. The proposal will also discuss critical challenges facing the
organization and how Beverly can change the organizational culture and structure for better
performance. Lastly, the paper will explain how Beverly can align the hospital’s strategic
mission with its strategic goal to ensure that the organization realizes profits again.
Main issues Beverly is facing
Key issues that Beverly is facing at Century Hospitals include turning around the dwindling
profits of the organization, improving employee motivation, aligning the hospital with its strategic
mission, and changing the organizational culture and structure. Century Hospitals is facing
significant competition from new specialty hospitals, national physician clinics, and surgery
centers. These new entrants are eroding Century Hospitals’ market by raking its customers away.
Beverly has to look for strategies for dealing with competition to turnaround the profitability of
the organization. Motivating the employee is the other issue that Beverly has to deal with within
the organization. Employee dissatisf...


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