Geography Question

Writing

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Follow the instructions in the uploaded file. I will send you the data you need for this assignment to your OneDrive.

You need to have access to ArcGIS desktop to do this assignment.

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The Scenario You have recently begun your GIS internship with an outdoor adventure guidebook company. Your supervisor has asked that you put together a map of Point Reyes National Seashore for their next publication. The company has not had a GIS technician for some time and the data that they collected is distributed in many different locations. You will need to collect the data together to generate your map. Work hard, rumor has it that the firm is looking to hire a GIS tech again. Exercise 2: Storing and distributing data and map documents It is important that we understand the relationship between spatial data used in a map and the ArcMap document. Unlike many other software applications, ArcMap will not store a copy of your data. Rather, the map document only stores a link to your data and the folder path to where it is stored. As you continue to work with ArcGIS, you will be working with data from a wide range of sources. This can include online data, data on a shared network, data on your local hard drive and data on your portable data storage device. A major task in GIs is data and file management. In this exercise you will work with data from a wide variety of sources and will learn how to bring all of this data together for your mapping project and how to keep you map document working well each time you open it. In this exercise you will:     continue to hone your skills with ArcMap learn more about symbology learn the relationship between your spatial data and your map document develop crucial file management skills. Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Building an ArcMap document 1. Open ArcMap and begin a new empty map document. You may also want to open ArcCatalog as you may wish to add data to your map document via ArcCatalog. 2. Add the trails arc coverage file to your ArcMap document. Because this was the first layer added to the map document, the data frame adopted the coordinate system from this layer, UTM zone 10. 3. Add these additional layers to your map document. Your instructor will provide you with the source locations of this data. • trails arc (coverage file added in step 2 above) • road (Shapefile) • streams (Shapefile) • vegetation-pore&goga-1994 (Shapefile) • Counties (Shapefile used in the previous exercise) 3. Arrange the data layers in the Table of Contents so that the data is layered as listed above. Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 2 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Changing the background color of your data frame 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1 Point Reyes National Seashore is on the Northern Coast of California. The blank area to the left is water. In this task, you will change the background color to blue to give the impression of water. In the Table of Contents, right click the data frame title Layers. On the content sensitive menu, select Properties... This will open the Data Frame Properties Dialog Box. Select the Frame tab. Click the large drop down menu in the Background square and select Blue. This color is Sugilite Sky. Click OK to apply the change and close the Data Frame Properties dialog box. 2 3 4 5 Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 3 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Changing symbology: categories selecting specific unique values 3 Far too much data is being displayed and the map looks jumbled and confusing. In the following tasks, you will modify the symbology to simplify the data being displayed. 1. Using the check box the Table of Contents, hide all of the layers except Counties and road. 2. Right click the road layer name and select Properties. 3. 4. 5. 6. This will open the Layers Properties dialog box. Click the Symbology tab. Click Categories in the Pane on the left side of the dialog box. In the Values Field drop down menu, select CFCC. CFCC is a coded value established by the census bureau to classify the road type. “A41” is a city street, “A31” is a State and county highway. Click the Add Values button at the bottom of the dialog box. Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier 4 5 Page 4 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents This will open the Add Values dialog box. 7. Click the Complete List button. 8. In the pane, select A31 and click OK to add the value. 9. Repeat steps 6 through 8 to also add value A41. 10. Un-check the check box, hiding All Other Values. 11. Double click the symbol for A31. 8 This will open the Symbol Selector dialog box. 12. Select a red color and a line thickness of 1.50. You may need to type this line thickness value into the box. 13. Repeat steps 12 and 13 to modify the symbology for value A41, setting it to black or dark grey with the same line thickness. 14. Click OK to close the Layers Properties dialog box and apply your changes. 15. Turn on the streams layer using the check box in the Table of Contents. Fix the stream layer You now need to work through this exercise again, modifying the symbology used for the streams layer. Specifics for this layer are listed below. 7 10 11 In Step 5: Specify MINOR1 In Step 8: Select value 412 In Step 10: Be sure to also hide All Other Values In Step 13: Use the pre-defined RIVER symbol Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 5 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Changing symbology: categories adding all values You will now modify the symbology used for the vegetation layer. 1. Turn on the Vegetation layer using the check box in the Table of Contents. 2. Open the Layers Properties dialog box for the vegetation layer and select the Symbology tab. 3. Click Categories in the Pane on the left side of the dialog box. 4. In the Values Field drop down menu, select GROUP. 5. In the Color Ramp drop down menu, choose an appealing color scheme. 6. Click the Add All Values button at the bottom of the dialog box. This will add a different symbol for each type of “group” found in the attribute table. 7. Click the Symbol table header and select Properties for All Symbols. This will open the Symbol Selector dialog box. 8. Set the Outline Color to No Color. Do not adjust the Fill Color. 9. Click Apply. This will apply your modifications, but leave the Layers Properties dialog box open if you need to make additional modifications. Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier 3 4 5 7 6 9 Page 6 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Things look pretty well, except the water in the Vegetation layer is not the right color. 10. Pan up and down the list, finding the group entitled Water. 11. Double click the symbol for Water. This will open the Symbol Selector dialog box. 12. Set the fill color for Water to Sugilite Sky. 13. Click OK to close the Symbol Selector dialog box. 14. Click OK to Close the Layers Properties dialog box. Want More? Modify the colors for some of the other vegetation groups. • Modify the line symbology for trails to a light, dotted line • Modify the color of the Counties layer to something more appealing. • 12 Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 7 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Data file management basics You have a lovely map and your boss will be happy, but you are using data found all over the place. In this task you will centralize all of your data. 1. On your portable data storage device, create a new folder called Pt_Reyes_Map. 2. Within the Pt_Reyes_Map folder, create another folder called Data. 3. Save your map into the Pt_Reyes_Map folder. Choose a name that will provide some idea of what is on the map. 2 Naming Conventions Although the software is becoming more sophisticated, you still may wish to follow some of the naming conventions that were needed in previous versions of the software • Avoid spaces in your name. Instead, use dashes (-), underscores ( _ )or stager upper and lower case letters. • Keep your names shorter, typically within 8-10 characters. • Even within these limitations, try to name it something you will recognize. You don’t want to end up with hundreds of maps called “GIS_map” • If you create multiple versions of the same map, be sure to indicate the date that the map is being made so you can organize your maps chronologically. Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 8 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents You will now move all of your data to the Data folder you created. 4. In ArcCatalog, begin moving the GIS data used in this map to the Data folder you created. 5. If you are unable to recall the sources of all of all of the data, Click the Source tab found at the bottom of the Table of Contents in ArcMap. File path of data displayed in the source tab. The display in the table of contents will change, including the file paths to each of the layers used in the map. 6. Once complete, save and close the ArcMap document. 7. Delete any duplicate versions of the data used in this map that you might have on your portable data storage device or local computer. 5 Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 9 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Repairing and changing data sources 1. Open your ArcMap document. You might find that some of the layers are not being drawn and have a red exclamation mark near their name in the Table of Contents. The exclamation mark indicates that the file pathway to the data is no longer available. This is because we deleted the extra copies of the data in the previous steps. ArcMap is looking for those previous versions. No need to worry, you created a new copy of the data in the previous task. You will now repair the data source pathway. 2. Right click the layer name that is not displaying, Select Data, then Select Repair Data Source. This will open the Data Source dialog box. Exclamation mark indicates that the data source pathway is broken 2 Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 10 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents 3. Navigate to the Data folder where you have stored a copy of the data. 4. Select the corresponding data file you wish to use for the layer display. 5. Click Add to apply the changes to the data source. 6. Open the Source tab on the Table of Contents. You will notice that the correct data path is being used for the layer you just corrected. However, other layers are still using the original data source and not the copy of the data you created in the project folder. You will now change the data sources for these other layers. 7. Return to the Display tab on the Table of Contents. 8. Right click the layer name, and open the Layer Properties Dialog box for the layer. 9. Open the Source tab on the Layer Properties dialog box. 10. Click the Set Data Source button. This will open the Data Source dialog box. 11. As you did previously in this task, navigate to the Data folder where you have stored a copy of the data. 12. Select the corresponding data file you wish to use for the layer display. 13. Click Add to apply the changes to the data source. 14. Repeat steps 8 through 13 for each of the layers in your map. The ArcMap document is now using the data in your project folder to display each layer as opposed to the data previously distributed all around. 3 4 5 9 10 Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier Page 11 Exercise 2 : Storing and distributing data and map documents Changing ArcMap data source options By default, ArcMap uses the full path name to data sources. For example, in the images from the previous tasks, the portable storage device is the “F” drive. However, if the same portable device were to be recognized on a different computer as a different drive, the data source path name would again be corrupt and the map would not display correctly. To correct this problem, you will set the data source options to store the relative path names. This is also applicable if you intend on saving this project on another computer or burning it to a CD or other device. 1. Click File on the Main menu and select Document Properties. This will open the Map Document Properties dialog box. 2. Click the Data Source Options button. This will open the Data Source Options dialog box. 3. Select the option to Store relative path names to data sources. 4. Click OK to close the data Source Options dialog box. 5. Click OK to close the Map Document Properties dialog box. 6. Save your map document. Now that you have stored your map document and data in the same project folder and set the data source options to store relative path names, whenever the ArcMap document seeks for the layer data, it will look for paths that are relative to the document and not for exact drive names and folders. Exploring the Fundamentals of GIS by Scott Crosier 2 4 3 Page 12 ...
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