CSS 225- Adventure game. Part 2 – Outline the game’s functionality and file structure

Programming

CSS225

NLU

Question Description

you will be programming a fully functional, text-based game that a user is able to play from beginning to end. Your game will need a story, characters, places, actions, win conditions, and lose conditions. Your user will make choices that will affect other parts of the game. It will be a single program made up of several files.

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Milestone 1 Part 1 - Creating Your Adventure Game Narrative Instructions Part 1 soft due date: October 11 by 11:59PM Central. • Fill out “Narrative Outline.docx” according to the specifications in this document. Submit to d2l for feedback Parts 1 and 2 hard due date: October 18 by 11:59PM Central. The Basics: For your final project, you will be programming a fully functional, text-based game that a user is able to play from beginning to end. Your game will need a story, characters, places, actions, win conditions, and lose conditions. Your user will make choices that will affect other parts of the game. It will be a single program made up of several files. Your game will be operated through the IDLE shell using only text. Graphics and sound are not expected. Avoid PyGame for the sake of this assignment. This first milestone will come in two parts: Part 1 - Create your narrative for your adventure game. Part 2 – Outline the game’s functionality and file structure. This milestone is meant to be a starting place. As you move forward with the project, you’ll probably find you want to add, remove, or change parts of your story and functionality. This is very much expected, just keep me informed of any major changes so we make sure your game stays within the requirements. I encourage creativity and looking beyond just what we’ve learned in class. If there is something you’d like to research and implement, I’m all for it. Again, just keep me informed so you avoid biting off more than you can chew. Part 1 – The Narrative This first part of the milestone will establish what kind of story you want to tell. This will be fairly open-ended, but there are some basics that you must include: • A story with a beginning, middle, and end • A main character with some kind of stats, inventory, score card, etc. • People, places, creatures, and items that your character will interact with • The choices the player makes must affect the game in some way. For example, if your player didn’t collect enough money, they won’t be able to buy an item they need until they do. • The player must be able to win the game in at least one way • The player must be able to lose the game in at least one way If these elements are all present, you will have a successful narrative, and will be well on your way towards creating your structure. This is not a creative writing class. You will not be graded on how intricate and involved your writing style is. However, the more enthusiastic you are about your story, the more fun this project will be for both you and your player. Please keep everything PG-13 (you get one F-bomb) If you are really struggling to come up with a narrative, you are free to use an existing game, movie, or TV show as a base. Just indicate what it is somewhere in your outline. Basic outline – Fill in the chart found in “Narrative Outline.docx” Use the examples below as a guide. This can be flexible. Each section could be a major location if you want a more open world, some kind of challenge like a legal trial or battle match-up, or scenes/chapters like in a movie or a book. The important thing is that there is a progression where the character must do something in each section in order to advance the story and get closer to winning. In each section, consider adding something that could cause the player to lose. You’ll need at least one way to lose in the whole game. Example 1 Genre: Fantasy Location: Narule Main character (player): Elia, A humble young traveler itching for excitement and looking for an opportunity to become a hero. Game Objective: The locals of a nearby town are terrified of a monster who kidnaps one of them every year. Gather information, weapons, and supplies, and head out to slay the beast and free the town. Section example: Section 1 What’s happening What can the player choose to do "It was a cold night, and the rain swept in from the west with a ferocity known only to the gods." Elia comes across the local tavern and seeks shelter from the storm. She overhears a hushed conversation about an upcoming event in the village. The tavern keeper seems worried. - Talk to the tavern keeper - Snoop on the conversation - Buy a drink or some food - Rest for the night - Leave the tavern to brave the storm What must the player do to progress; what could cause the player to lose - Player needs to talk to either the tavern keeper or snoop on the conversation to learn about the monster and move to section 2. -The player loses if they brave the storm instead of resting for the night (unless they already have a heavy raincoat in their inventory) Example 2 (based on Stardew Valley) Genre: Simulation Location: Stardew Valley Main Character (Player): Ronan, a young professional wasting away at a corporate job, decides to move to his late grandfather’s farm to start a new life. Game Objective: Make enough money on your farm to buy a local piece of land to prevent a major company from building on it and disrupting the peace in the town. Section 1 What’s happening What can the player choose to do What must the player do to progress; what could cause the player to lose “Your grandfather’s old land might need a little TLC, but I’m sure it’ll start to feel like home soon,” says Robyn, the local carpenter. “Let me know if you need a chicken coop!” Ronan starts working the land to plant the few parsnip seeds he has. He ventures into town when he’s too tired to work. - Hoe the soil - Plant the seeds - Water the seeds - Chop wood - Head into town - Go to bed - The player must plant and water their seeds, then go to bed. Their parsnips will be done growing the next day (section 2) - If the player uses too much energy and gets too tired, they’ll pass out with a 1/10 chance of dying. Example 3 (based on Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney) Genre: Detective/RPG Location: Los Angeles Main Character (Player): Phoenix Wright, a new lawyer fresh out of law school, eager to prove himself with challenging cases. Game Objective: Investigate the crime scenes to collect enough evidence to prove your clients are not guilty. Face off against your long-time rival in a thrilling final court battle. Section 1 What’s happening What can the player choose to do What must the player do to progress; what could cause the player to lose “If I can keep my wits about me, I know I’ll win my very first case! Phoenix is in his very first court hearing to acquit his childhood friend of murder and find the real culprit. - Raise an objection - Challenge a witness’s statement - Present evidence - Ask your senior colleague for a hint - The player must challenge the witness’s statement about the time of the murder and use a broken clock found at the scene to catch him in the lie. This wins the case, move to section 2. -No lose condition Milestone 1 Part 2 – Structuring Your Game Milestone 1 Parts 1 and 2 due: Sunday, October 18 by 11:59PM Central. By now, you should have your narrative planned out. You should have a solid idea of what will happen in each of your story’s sections, the actions the player can take, and the progression your character must make. Now, you’ll come up with an outline for how your game will be structured in code. As I said before, your game will be one program, broken out into multiple files. These files will be able to interact with each other in order to run the full game. The Basics: When we’re coding a larger program, we want to break it into pieces to be more organized. We’ll also be able to reuse as much code as possible, cutting down on development and debugging time. You’ll have two different kinds of files: modules and classes. We’ll discuss these in more detail in class soon. Outlining your structure: For this milestone, you will submit your finalized narrative outline and multiple .py files, each representing a piece of your game. You’ll need at least the following. All should be .py files with appropriate names (these file names cannot include spaces): • 1 main file that will control the whole game. • 1 file for each section of your narrative. If you are implementing all 5 sections, you should submit 5 files. • 1 file representing the main character. • At least 1 file representing something in your game that interacts with your character (a store, enemies, NPCs, animals, etc.) Each of these files needs: • Proper headers in comments describing what each file is. • Pseudocode written in comments outlining the functionality of the file. o Main file should include the intro and basic progression o Sections should include the narrative being told, what options the player has at key points in the narrative, and what the player needs to do to progress the narrative o The main character file and object file should include properties and actions of what they represent. These will become variables and functions. ▪ Possible character properties: name, stats, conditions, inventories, money, Booleans for whether or not they completed something ▪ Possible actions: Buy something, attack, defend, accuse, persuade, use something in their inventory ▪ Possible object properties: buffs/debuffs, stats, price, broken status, amount/number remaining Final turn-in: Part 1 – Finished narrative outline (.docx) Part 2 – All the .py files that will be present in your final game ...
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