Deliberate Development Plan, writing homework help
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Question Description

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Select a subordinate or Airman you currently supervise, mentor, and/or work with regularly. If you do not work with Airmen, reflect on yourself as a past airman.

2. Assume you are about to discuss deliberate development with this selected individual.

3. Write a subordinate deliberate development plan for this individual.

4. As a minimum, your plan must address the following areas of development. Provide a brief description and/or supporting information for each of your development considerations. Explain how each developmental consideration benefits the member’s preferred team role (CARE Concept) see attached** from team building attachment and cognitive preference (A-I Theory) see attached**. Then, identify and explain how and why your recommended actions will benefit the subordinate and the Air Force.

5. Format DDP as follows.

PART I - Considerations

TIG:

TIS:

Current Training Status:

Team Member Most Probable Preferred Role:

Cognitive Preference Behaviors/Indicators:

Goals and Aspirations:

PART II - Recommendations

Additional Duty:

Special Duty Assignment:

Training:

Education:

****Please try and use military terms and stick to the attached rubric (see attched) so that I can receive maximum points.

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1 Oct 16 DELIBERATE DEVELOPMENT PLAN FORMAT INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Select a subordinate or Airman you currently supervise, mentor, and/or work with regularly. If you do not work with Airmen, reflect on yourself as a past airman. 2. Assume you are about to discuss deliberate development with this selected individual. 3. Write a subordinate deliberate development plan for this individual. 4. As a minimum, your plan must address the following areas of development. Provide a brief description and/or supporting information for each of your development considerations. Explain how each developmental consideration benefits the member’s preferred team role and cognitive preference. Then, identify and explain how and why your recommended actions will benefit the subordinate and his/her branch of service. 5. Format DDP as follows. PART I - Considerations TIG: TIS: Current Training Status: Team Member Most Probable Preferred Role: Cognitive Preference Behaviors/Indicators: Goals and Aspirations: PART II - Recommendations Additional Duty: Special Duty Assignment: Training: Education: 6. Use the Deliberate Development Plan Evaluation Instrument as a guide. 7. Post your plan in the Learning Management System (LMS) Assignment Center in accordance with the course schedule. If you believe you may want to make changes, save as draft. It must be submitted as final on the due date in order to be graded. Failure to complete the assignment is an automatic failure. See schedule for specific suspense date. DDPHO3 - 1 FORMAT REQUIREMENTS: 1. Use Microsoft Word or PDF format 2. Narrative writing style within each element in Part II (no bullets) 3. Written to subordinate 4. Times New Roman, 12-point font 5. One-inch margins (all) 6. Double-spaced between elements, sentences, and lines 7. Include cover page (see sample) 8. Number all pages, bottom center, excluding cover page (e.g. cover page, 1, 2, 3) DDPHO3 - 2 (DELIBERATE DEVELOPMENT PLAN COVER PAGE EXAMPLE) SUBORDINATE DELIBERATE DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR RANK FIRST NAME LAST NAME [ENTER NAME] NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER ACADEMY STUDENT: RANK FIRST NAME LAST NAME DAY MONTH YEAR INSTRUCTOR: TSgt JOHN DOE DDPHO3 - 3 CONSIDERATIONS Identified TIG, TIS, and explained current training status. Identified and properly applied member's most probable preferred team role. Identified and properly applied member's most probable cognitive preference behaviors/indicators. Identified and explained member's personal goals and aspirations ADDITIONAL DUTY RECOMMENDATION Identified and fully justified an Additional Duty recommendation Explained how AND why the Additional Duty will benefit the member’s most probable preferred team role. Explained how AND why the Additional Duty will benefit the member’s most probable cognitive preference behaviors/indicators. Explained how AND why the Additional Duty will benefit his/her branch of service. SPECIAL DUTY RECOMMENDATION Identified and fully justified a Special Duty recommendation. If no Special Duty was recommended, explained the earliest opportunity that a Special Duty will be appropriate and described the circumstance(s) that would justify the recommendation at that time. Explained how AND why the Special Duty will benefit the member’s most probable preferred team role. Explained how AND why the Special Duty will benefit the member’s most probable cognitive preference behaviors/indicators. Explained how AND why the Special Duty will benefit his/her branch of service. TRAINING RECOMMENDATION Identified and fully justified training recommendation. Explained how AND why the training recommendation will benefit the member’s most probable preferred team role. Explained how AND why the training recommendation will benefit the member’s most probable cognitive preference behaviors/indicators. Explained how AND why the training recommendation will benefit his/her branch of service. EDUCATION RECOMMENDATION Identified and fully justified an education recommendation. Explained how AND why the education recommendation will benefit the member’s most probable preferred team role. Explained how AND why the education recommendation will benefit the member’s most probable cognitive preference behaviors/indicators. Explained how AND why the education recommendation will benefit his/her branch of service. GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS No distracting use of unfamiliar words; acronyms defined as needed; no redundancies, word choice clearly conveyed meaning Format How well did the student’s paper conform to the Deliberate Development Plan format requirements: Used Microsoft Word or PDF format, cover page (includes rank/name or subordinate), one-inch margins, pages numbered (bottom center except cover page), Times New Roman (12-point font), double spaced between sentences, elements, and lines, and written to subordinate? 168 CHAPTER SIX: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Inside this chapter: Preferred Cognitive (Thinking) Approach A-I Theory’s Basic Principles Adaption-Innovation Theory Proper Terms and Perception Implications for Use of A-I Theory “To problem solve successfully . . . we need to view problems and conceive solutions in terms of what is needed. . . we need to understand how each person in our problem-solving team works, so as to get the best out of everyone as the nature of each problem changes” – M .J. Kirton Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to: TERMINAL COGNITIVE OBJECTIVE: Comprehend how A-I Theory impacts NCO, unit, and mission effectiveness. Terminal Cognitive Samples of Behavior: 4. 5. 6. Explain how A-I Theory impacts NCO, unit, and mission effectiveness. Give examples of A-I Theory impacting NCO, unit, and mission effectiveness. Predict the impact of A-I Theory NCO, unit, and mission effectiveness. AFFECTIVE OBJECTIVE: Value A-I Theory and how it enhances NCO, unit, and mission effectiveness. Affective Samples of Behavior: 1. 2. 3. Read about A-I Theory concepts with an open mind and remember new information (receiving). Complete all activities (progress checks, exercises, and selfreflection), and question concepts, models, etc. in order to fully understand them (responding). Accept the idea that effective use of A-I Theory concepts positively impacts individual, unit, and mission effectiveness (value). Willingly develop a preference for using A-I Theory concepts to enhance individual, unit, and mission effectiveness (value). Commit to using A-I Theory concepts to enhance individual, unit, and mission effectiveness (value). mission effectiveness (value) 169 Imagine this. The Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force has been levied with the task of creating a new performance system for enlisted personnel. He forms a team of the leading experts in enlisted force development. The experts begin to propose different designs to use to build the new performance system. There are strains developing within the team. They seem to bicker a lot and lose track of the objective. It appears they will never develop the new performance system. What problems do you see? You could label them Problem A: creating a new performance system for enlisted personnel; and Problem B: getting the team to work toward the common objective of creating a new enlisted performance system. Why should NCOs be concerned with Problem A and Problem B situations? NCOs typically work in teams on the job. Teams typically solve problems better than individuals solve and therefore, are seen as superior in handling complex problems involving intertwining competencies and expertise. Teams are superior only if they can solve the problems for which they were created. Teams are superior only if they can stay focused on Problem A. Teams that are consumed with Problem B will never solve Problem A. Leaders must learn to solve difficult problems that are complex and hard to define. Because change is 4. constant, problem solving has to change and flex with the situations as they develop. A vibrant solution in 5. one situation would be a disaster in another. Problem solving teams rely on blending different talents in different combinations in order to reach viable solutions at the strategic levels of the Air Force. The A-I Theory helps you understand attributes that enhance the team. It also makes you aware of another aspect – that of diversity. This chapter will convey useful information to help you understand the A-I Theory. Don’t confuse the A-I theory with the techniques of adaptive thinking and innovative thinking that you learned about in Chapter 4, Strategic Thinking. The techniques in chapter 4 augment our “preferred style of problem solving” covered in this chapter. In order for you, as a supervisor, to understand the A-I Theory, you will look at preferred cognitive (thinking) approach, A-I Theory’s Basic Principles, understanding adaption-innovation, proper terms and perception, cognitive gap, bridgers, and coping behavior. 170 Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Preferred Cognitive (Thinking) Approach Thinking is the means by which we solve problems and are creative. We cannot “see” thinking occur so we have to devise means to identify one’s preferred thinking (cognitive) style. The Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory (KAI) is a precise measure of preferred thinking style. The KAI is a psychometric instrument that has been tested across many cultures, and for over 40 years, proven to be one of the world’s most reliable and valid instruments for measuring cognitive preference. Kirton’s work proves that preferred styles are established by the late teenage years and remain stable throughout life. The instrument is so reliable that if you took it when you first joined the Air Force and then take it again today, your score today would be within one half of a standard error of measurement (10 points) deviation from your original score. A-I Theory’s Basic Principles A-I Theory Emphasizes Three Key Issues: 1. When we problem solve we are limited by the way we are built (e.g. our intelligence, no one has endless capacity or flexibility). 2. All of us are intelligent and creative, at different levels and with different styles, and therefore, all of us are capable of learning to contribute to team problem solving, as long as there is both motive and opportunity. Problem A: This is an ‘actual problem’ that two of more individuals come together to solve. Problem B: This encompasses all of the problems (team dynamics, interpersonal skills, communication, collaboration, etc.) that stem from ‘human interactions’ and it steals time and energy from efforts needed to solve Problem A. 3. Leaders interact with people to solve a myriad of problems every day and to be truly successful at solving both problem A and problem B, leaders must be able to effectively manage the diversity that stems from people whose A-I preference ranges from highly adaptive to the highly innovative and every point in between. Adaption-Innovation Theory One could spend years reading and learning about this theory and still not understand fully its power. Even today, Dr. Kirton, along with his closest colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania and the Thomas N. Barnes Center for Enlisted Education are learning new things about the theory and new ways it can be used to help organizations, and the leaders of those organization solve problems and manage change. With that said, our purpose here is to provide a basic understanding of the theory in order to help you better understand yourself and those you lead. As they say, leadership begins with selfawareness. Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory 171 The Adaption-Innovation Theory is founded on the assumption that all people solve problems and are creative, and that both are outcomes of the same brain function. “The theory sharply distinguishes between level and style of creativity, problem solving, and decision making, therefore the theory is ONLY concerned with style” Level: Refers to potential capacity (intelligence or talent) and learned levels (such as management, supervisory and leadership competency). It is important to understand and remember that both styles (adaption and innovation) are found at every level—from the highest to the lowest. Style: Refers to “how we think,” our preferred cognitive approach to problem solving, and decision making. These style differences, which lie on a normally distributed continuum, range from strong adaption to strong innovation. Progress Check 1. What is the difference between Problem A and Problem B? 2. The Adaption-Innovation Theory is only concerned with ___________. 3. What is the difference between style and level? 172 Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Proper Terms and Perception Although people tend to use the terms adaptors and innovators, we should always use the more precise terms of “more adaptive” and “more innovative.” These are better because they keep us from labeling others as only adaptive or only innovative. The fact is, although your position on the continuum remains stable over time, how you are perceived is relative and changes depending on who (individuals/groups) you are interacting with. The bell curve below shows the distribution of style preferences along the A-I continuum. All numbers refer to the general population relative to a normal distribution of the responses (Bell Curve): 1. 68% fall between Mild Adaptor and Mild Innovator (34% on each side of mean) 2. 26% are moderate adaptors or moderate innovators (13.59% each) 3. 5% are strong adaptors or strong innovator (2.14% each) Bell Curve Refer to Perceptions Figures below: Example 1: In this example, you (Y) are in the Mild Adaptor area of the continuum and the people (P) you work with are very close to your position on the continuum. These people perceive you (and you perceive them) as being very similar, e.g. all of you take a very similar approach to problem solving. You may also notice that it is easy to communicate with the members in this group. Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory 173 Example 2: Although your position (Y) on the continuum has not changed, the people you interact with fall in the Moderate and Strong Innovator areas of the continuum, and as a result, they may perceive you as conforming, predictable, inflexible, wedded to the system, and intolerant of ambiguity. You probably see them as unsound, impractical, risky, abrasive, and a threat to the established system. You may also notice some challenges in communicating (getting your thoughts across) to this group Example 3: Once again, your position has not changed, but this time, the people you must interact with fall below you in the Strong Adaptor area of the continuum. This means they will more than likely perceive you as unsound, impractical, risky, abrasive, and a threat to the established system, just as you perceived the people in example 2. Again, you may also notice some challenges in communicating (getting your thoughts across) to this group. So, it is all relative! Although your position on the continuum does not change, how others perceive you and how you perceive them depends on where you are on the continuum in relation to their position. Perceptions 174 Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory So what is the take away from these examples: First, it is equally important that you understand how others perceive you, and why they perceive you that way. Remember it is relative to where you and others fall on the continuum. Second, although large gaps between styles means greater chances of conflict (i.e. Problem B), it also offers greater potential/ability to solve problems (Problem A) because of cognitive diversity. Regardless of where we fall on the continuum, we can all be equally creative, which also means we can all be equally good or equally bad at handling change. Before moving on, let’s be clear about Problem A and Problem B. Problem A: This is the ‘actual problem’ that two of more individuals come together to solve. Problem B: This encompasses all of the problems (team dynamics, interpersonal skills, communication, collaboration, etc.) that stem from ‘human interactions’ and it steals time and energy from efforts needed to solve Problem A. In the examples above we used words and phrases such as predictable, inflexible, wedded to the system, and unsound to describe the more adaptive and words like impractical, risky, and abrasive to describe the more innovative. In reality, both styles have many traits, tendencies, and characteristics as described below. See if you recognize any of them in yourself. Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Adaptors exhibit the following tendencies: 175 Innovators exhibit the following tendencies: - Prefer more structure and more of it consensually agreed. - Prefer less structure and can tolerate less of it consensually agreed - Improve or extend the paradigm in order to solve problems. - Challenge or break the paradigm in order to solve problems. - Use rules to solve problems. - May break the rules to solve problems. - Bring order out of turbulence. - Catalyze the necessary turbulence. - Revitalize current systems for tomorrow. - Help create break from worn-out systems. - Work within the system to bring about new improvement, ideas, and greater efficiencies. - Work outside the system to bring about different ideas and different structures for the high Adaptors - Value themselves for being: - Value themselves for being -- Improvers -- Full of Ideas -- Resource Effective -- Provocative -- Supportive -- Assumption Challengers -- Consistent -- Accepting of Change -- Methodical -- Intuitive -- Masters of Structure -- Mold Breakers -- Sound -- Shocking -- Prudent Risk-takers -- Daring Risk-takers 176 Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory Progress Check 4. What is a more precise term for adaptors? 5. What is a more precise term for innovators? 6. Why is it important to know where you fall on the Adaption-Innovation continuum? 7. Why does a large gap in style offer greater potential/ability to solve problems? 8. What are some of the tendencies adaptors exhibit concerning “structure”? 9. What are some of the tendencies innovators exhibit concerning “structure”? 10. What are some of the tendencies adaptors exhibit concerning “the paradigm”? 11. What are some of the tendencies innovators exhibit concerning “the paradigm”? Chapter Six: Adaption-Innovation (A-I) Theory 177 Implications for Use of A-I Theory Cognitive Gap: There are two forms of cognitive gap. The first form is the distance between one’s preferred style and the behavior actually needed in a particular situation (i.e. the distance between ones preferred style and his/her task). The second form is, the distance in a social interaction, between the preferred styles of 1) two people, 2) a person and a group, or 3) two groups (refer back to figure 2). According to A-I Theory, the larger the cognitive gap, the greater the potential for conflict and for productive problem solving Potential for Conflict Small Gaps: A difference in cognitive styles becomes noticeable when the distance between two individuals (or two groups) falls on the extreme edges of a style (e.g. Moderate Innovators). The advantage of this small gap is there is very little, if any, conflict. If conflict does occur, both individuals find it easy to manage. The disadvantage of this gap is likeminded thinking can lead to less than optimal solutions. Large Gaps: These are when one individual (or group) has one style and the other person or group has an adjacent style (e.g. Mild Adaptor interacting with a Mild Innovator). With this difference, individuals find they must consciously manage the relationship due to minor, but very noticeable ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running Head: DELIBERATE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Deliberate Development Plan
Institution Affiliation
Date:

1

DELIBERATE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

2

CONSIDERATIONS
Grey is a member of the air force with quality critical thinking skills and who also loves
the force with a lot of energy. SSgt Grey would make an effective ALS creator in his team. Grey
is one airman that loves new challenges and would be willing to promote new concepts to be
followed by his team rather than focusing on old techniques. This challenge will allow SSgt Grey
an opportunity to ensure that his team is not idle but engaging in implementation of new
concepts. As a creator in air force field SSgt Grey will have to train with the team members on
how to effectively execute the proposed ideas and also how to best promote them. Creation f new
ideas alone will not benefit the team as the team will only have ideas t implement without a
direction on how to best approach them. Additionally as an ...

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