FOUN 1106 George Brown College Access to Clean Water Thesis Outline

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I WANT OUTLINE TO BE DONE WITHIN 6 HOURS THE TOPIC IS( WORLD OF WATER ) The Question is why is access to clean water a problem for some communities? after the outline i want an essay about the same topic and i have the resources that you can use it in the essay from my school library. use the attached files as resource and citation.

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Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our products. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace original scanned PDF. Neither Cengage Learning nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the machine generated PDF. The PDF is automatically generated "AS IS" and "AS AVAILABLE" and are not retained in our systems. CENGAGE LEARNING AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the machine generated PDF is subject to all use restrictions contained in The Cengage Learning Subscription and License Agreement and/or the Gale OneFile: CPI.Q Terms and Conditions and by using the machine generated PDF functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against Cengage Learning or its licensors for your use of the machine generated PDF functionality and any output derived therefrom. How would you measure happiness? The National Happiness Index measures things like access to housing, clean water, education and jobs Date: Mar. 5, 2019 From: The Record (Kitchener, Ontario) Publisher: CNW Group Ltd. - Toronto Star Newspapers Document Type: Article Length: 856 words Full Text: Byline: Dave Davis What is the NHI? While you're thinking about that, let me tell you a story - two actually - about former patients (you know the drill by now: these aren't their real names, the stories are altered a bit). Giles first: he was in his late sixties when I met him. Big home on Burlington's lakefront (I parked in front of his four car garage once, making a house call, right beside the Beamer.) A yacht I think. Cottage in Muskoka. His problem: depression. He had worked hard all his life, was the guy who occupied an office with Vice President or maybe Senior Director on the door in some big outfit - in Toronto, I think. The day he retired, it was all gone: not the house and the yacht and cars, but the sign-on-the-door and the things that clung to it, like a bride's train - the influence, the staff, the meaning. It was a terrible time for him, a serious mid-late life melancholy. And then there was Alan, maybe 15 years older. Single, living on a fixed (and very small) income, in a tiny walk-up in the same city. Physically unwell, he was a happy man; he enjoyed walking, the free movies and books at the library. He enjoyed women too, just their company at the stage I knew him, though I have a thought that he really enjoyed women when he was younger, sort of Ontario's Leonard Cohen. He took a young lady I knew out for lunch regularly, with no expectations except that he be with her for an hour and hear about her husband and kids, her life. At Easter one year, I broke a cardinal doctor-patient rule and bought him a small gift. The corner milk store had a BOGO tulips-andhyacinths deal - buy one, get one. What the heck? I thought: one for my wife and one to give a lonely old bachelor at Eastertide? A no-brainer: I gave it to him on a house call, where he was recovering from a pretty serious bout of congestive heart failure. A couple weeks later, better, he appeared at my office to thank me, saying, "You know that plant, Doc? It's beautiful! Every morning I get up around four, maybe four-thirty, just to watch the sunrise hit it - the hyacinths open kinda, and the smell is incredible. I love it!" He was quite a guy, that Alan. Which brings me to the topic of the NHI. The people of Bhutan, that tiny, innovative jewel of a country nestled in the Himalayas, invented the concept of national happiness as a marker of success. Not the number of widgets made per year, or the dollar value of all goods made - our traditional ways of measuring the success of a country - rather, the happiness of the people involved in their creation. How would you measure happiness? You might think they'd just do a Gallup poll sort of thing: twenty-year olds in T's walking around with a clip board, taking down answers to deep questions like, "Are you happy?" It's a bit like that, but the National Happiness Index is actually very sophisticated. It also measures things like access to housing, clean water, food, education and jobs. It assesses citizen engagement, diversity, and environmental concerns. It looks at fair government, law and safety and transportation. And it's not just the country of Bhutan; Dubai has invested a fair bit into happiness too - a Minister of Happiness, for example. And so has the United Nations, which produces The World Happiness Report. It ranks countries based on citizen self-reports and those factors I mentioned before. In case you're interested, Finland was ranked the happiest country in the world in 2018 (it must be the saunas and that vodka); Canada was seventh. Not bad (probably the Timmy's - my bet anyway). There's an element that I didn't mention in the UN's sophisticated measurement scale - what makes us happy. For many of us it's a spouse's touch, or our kids' hugs (a memory: an eleven-year-old with her arms tight-tight around her dad's neck; an eight-year-old grasping one of his dad's fingers, circling it like a ring). For Giles, it was the big job (though he learned, in later years, that his happiness didn't have to depend on that). To Alan, it was appreciation for the little things - the free library books and movies, the once-a-month lunches. The smell of a hyacinth opening in the morning. It's not the big things; in fact, maybe it's not things at all. Alan knew it all along. Giles learned it. We can too. Dave is a husband, father, grandfather, a retired family doc, and a speaker and writer. Look for his first novel this spring - "A Potter's Tale." It's a history of the end of the world - or maybe not. You can follow him @drauthor24 or write him at drdavedavis@gmail.com. CAPTION(S): The picturesque city of Helsinki, Finland. Finland was ranked the happiest country in the world in 2018, Dave Davis reports. Canada was ranked seventh most happy country in the world. Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2019 CNW Group Ltd. - Toronto Star Newspapers. Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd. https://www.cision.ca/ Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition) "How would you measure happiness? The National Happiness Index measures things like access to housing, clean water, education and jobs." Record [Kitchener, Ontario], 5 Mar. 2019, p. B5. Gale OneFile: CPI.Q, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A577032616/CPI?u=toro15002&sid=CPI&xid=a4cf3f38. Accessed 20 Feb. 2021. Gale Document Number: GALE|A577032616 Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our products. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace original scanned PDF. Neither Cengage Learning nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the machine generated PDF. The PDF is automatically generated "AS IS" and "AS AVAILABLE" and are not retained in our systems. CENGAGE LEARNING AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the machine generated PDF is subject to all use restrictions contained in The Cengage Learning Subscription and License Agreement and/or the Gale OneFile: CPI.Q Terms and Conditions and by using the machine generated PDF functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against Cengage Learning or its licensors for your use of the machine generated PDF functionality and any output derived therefrom. Access to clean water raises living standards Author: Ndomoni Tanzania Date: Oct. 2017 From: Anglican Journal(Vol. 143, Issue 8) Publisher: General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada Document Type: Article Length: 786 words Full Text: As the drowsy heat of afternoon descends, traffic on the footpath leading out of the village slows to a trickle. But small groups of women and children still regularly walk up to fill their large plastic buckets from the stainless-steel pump at the top of a rise of land overlooking a rice paddy. To the Canadians gathered around the pump, the water tastes bitter and heavy. But the Rev. Geoffrey Monjesa, development officer for the diocese of Masasi, assures them it is clean and safe for human consumption. And in southern Tanzania's arid savannah, this is what matters most. Until the pump was installed at the end of January 2017, most of Ndomoni's 1,321 residents walked up to eight kilometres to the nearest village to get water, or relied on surface water from ponds, which required boiling. Now, because of a project funded by the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) as part of a nutrition and food security project (known locally as the Community Health Improvement Project, or CHIP, which came to a close in March 2017), this walk has been shortened to a little more than a kilometre. The Canadians are members of a PWRDF delegation that has come to the diocese of Masasi to learn more about All Mothers and Children Count (AMCC), a larger project that builds off work done during CHIP. Though AMCC is focused on maternal and newborn child health, Monjesa uses this trip to the borehole to show how interconnected different aspects of the development projects are: there is a vast web of factors that affect health, and water is one of the most essential. "We cannot talk of treatment while water is not there," he explains, noting that people without a ready supply of clean drinking water will face a host of other health challenges. "Now, because water is here, it is easier for us now to educate people about [medical] treatment." But having accessible water isn't just about having water that is safe to drink. It is also about freeing up time--especially for the women and girls, who collect most of the water. "Time which they spent to walk long distances, now they use for other development activities," Monjesa says. Girls whose time might otherwise have been spent carrying water can stay in school longer, and mothers have more time to take their children to the clinic for a checkup, he notes. Setting up a borehole is no small task. It can take more than a year from the first site survey to the first jet of water from the pump's mouth. After hydrologists identify an appropriate site (which must meet the government's water policy and environmental policy criteria), an environmental impact assessment is carried out and sent to PWRDF, Global Affairs Canada and the Tanzanian government. Once the Canadian and Tanzanian governments sign off on it, the drilling can begin. The depth of the borehole depends on the location, but in the case of Ndomoni, it took the drilling machines (rented from Mtwara, 200 kilometres away) five days to penetrate 120 metres down, through bedrock, to find water, at a cost of $130,000 TZS (nearly $80 Cdn) per metre. Once the borehole has been drilled, water samples are sent to a laboratory in Mtwara for testing. If the water is deemed safe, the pump can be installed. In some cases, the government may decide to extend electricity to the site and pump water from the borehole to a holding tank in the village, saving the villagers even more time. (The government has told Ndomoni it will be setting up this infrastructure in the near future.) If the laboratory test finds the water unsafe, however, the borehole will be shut down, and the whole process will have to start over. "You may find that work is going to take place, maybe in July or in August, but the process started last year!" says Monjesa. "Especially for a hungry person, for a thirsty person, waiting that long period is very difficult for them." Fortunately, according to Monjesa, all 30 of the boreholes dug as part of the CHIP program hit safe drinking water on the first try. Another 20 will be built as part of the AMCC program. In May, staff writer Andre Forget travelled to Tanzania with a delegation from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund to visit projects supported by the Anglican Church of Canada. He filed these stories and photos, the second of a three-part series. Caption: Yahaya Namangaya, Ndomoni village chairperson, pumpswater for resident George Magomo, while members of village council discuss the borehole project with PWRDF staff member Zaida Bastos (middle). Please Note: Illustration(s) are not available due to copyright restrictions. Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2017 General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada http://www.anglicanjournal.com Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition) Tanzania, Ndomoni. "Access to clean water raises living standards." Anglican Journal, vol. 143, no. 8, Oct. 2017, p. 10. Gale OneFile: CPI.Q, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A511294492/CPI?u=toro15002&sid=CPI&xid=5a3b7fbf. Accessed 20 Feb. 2021. Gale Document Number: GALE|A511294492 Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our products. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace original scanned PDF. Neither Cengage Learning nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the machine generated PDF. The PDF is automatically generated "AS IS" and "AS AVAILABLE" and are not retained in our systems. CENGAGE LEARNING AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the machine generated PDF is subject to all use restrictions contained in The Cengage Learning Subscription and License Agreement and/or the Gale OneFile: News Terms and Conditions and by using the machine generated PDF functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against Cengage Learning or its licensors for your use of the machine generated PDF functionality and any output derived therefrom. Do Burials of COVID-19 victims cause ground water pollution? Date: Dec. 11, 2020 From: Daily Mirror Sri Lanka Publisher: HT Digital Streams Ltd. Document Type: Article Length: 910 words Full Text: Sri Lanka, Dec. 11 -- Burial or cremation of COVID-19 victims is a WHO recommendation for the disposal of those who die from this disease. This is practiced the world over in more than 190 countries. Sri Lanka prohibits burial on the belief that burial of COVID-19 victims contaminates ground water. Hitherto, the government scientists have not substantiated scientifically why it is prohibited while the international community and the global scientific authorities have recommended burial of such victims. This is a puzzling question yet to be answered by government scientists. The purpose of this article is to foresee whether burial of COVID-19 victims buried following the internationally accepted practice of burial of victims of the contagion would in reality contaminate the ground water? Does Infectious Human Cadavers Contaminate Ground Water Regarding infection hazards of human cadavers, Dr.P.N. Hoffman, MD and Timothy D. Healing, MD in the Guide to Infectious Control in the Health Care Setting (ISID Publication) in chapter titled 'The Infection Hazards of Human Cadavers' says the following as 'Known Facts': Most of the microorganisms that cause death do not survive for long after the host dies or are not readily transmissible in that context. Soft tissues remaining on a cadaver could present an infection risk. Long-buried bodies reduced to skeletons are not a hazard. A possible hazard in old burials is anthrax, which can form resistant spores but this is unlikely. In light of the above facts, the belief that burial of COVID-19 victims would contaminate soil/ground water is contestable since such infected cadavers are buried encapsulated in body bags which do not allow body fluids to spill over. The general burial procedures laid down by World Health Organisation (WHO) for patients who died of viral hemorrhaging fever (VHF) or similar disease is to bury them in double body bags. If we consider COVID-19 as similar to VHF, then potentially using double body bags for burial would solve the problem the country is suffering from. This will prevent infection as well as suspected soil or ground water pollution after burial. The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (ICRC), the International Society for Infectious Disease (ISID) and WHO recommend the use of double body bags for burial management of potentially infectious cadavers. Using body bags are an infection control measure since they are air and water tight containers which prevent ingress of water from outside whilst preventing egress of body fluids from the bag. Disposal of the deceased Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens of Public Health England (2015) in its publication titled, 'Management of Hazard Group 4 viral haemorrhagic fevers and similar human infectious diseases of high consequence' in the chapter 'Disposal of the Deceased' regarding the protocols of burial management recommends the use of double body bag and a sealed coffin for the disposal of the deceased as in Clause 4 and 6 of the said guidance: Clause 4. "Where a confirmed VHF case has died whilst being cared for in an isolator, the body should be removed into a sealable plastic body bag (specially designed for use with the isolator) fitted to the port of the bed isolator. The bag should be sealed, separated from the isolator, labelled as high-risk of infection and then placed in a robust coffin, which will need to have sealed joints. It should then be kept, by special prior arrangement with mortuary staff, in a separate and identified cold store unit to await prompt cremation or burial." Clause 6. "Where the body of a confirmed or suspected VHF patient is not in an isolator; staff wearing suitable PPE/RPE should place the body in a double body bag. Absorbent material should be placed between each bag, and the bag sealed and disinfected with 1,000 ppm available chlorine or other appropriate disinfectant. The bag should be labelled as high risk of infection and placed in the coffin as described above. An infection control notification sheet should be completed in readiness for the funeral directors." Use of Body Bags Body bags are used for the burial of war, natural disaster and pandemic victims. They are also used for temporary burial when forensic studies are required. It is a standard practice as an emergency response. Body Bag Specifications by ICRC for Infectious disease The ICRC gives the following body bag specifications to be used for disposal of infectious disease dead bodies as follows: Considering the fact that infection hazards of human cadavers have no potency to infect as established by scientific evidence, there is no reason for ground water contamination. The standards established by international bodies like WHO, ICRC, ISID and Public Health England about safe disposal of human cadavers in double body bags is recommended. Adopting the scientifically proven and internationally accepted practice of using body bags for COVID-19 cadavers is a simple solution than holding to an unsubstantiated belief that burial would cause ground water/soil contamination. The failure of the state scientists to guide the people and the government and leave without any scientific substantiation is causing problems more pernicious than COVID-19. This is causing untold human misery and tarnishes the image of the government. Hope knowledge and reason prevails among all stakeholders to solve this rationally. The writer is a member of the Society of Environmental Engineers, UK and a Chartered Environmentalist having a Master's Degree in Advanced Environmental & Energy Studies from the United Kingdom. Published by HT Digital Content Services with permission from Daily Mirror Sri Lanka. Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2020 HT Digital Streams Ltd. www.dailymirror.lk/ Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition) "Do Burials of COVID-19 victims cause ground water pollution?" Daily Mirror Sri Lanka, 11 Dec. 2020, p. NA. Gale OneFile: News, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A644504038/STND?u=toro15002&sid=STND&xid=e0a8ce3c. Accessed 20 Feb. 2021. Gale Document Number: GALE|A644504038 Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our products. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace original scanned PDF. Neither Cengage Learning nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the machine generated PDF. The PDF is automatically generated "AS IS" and "AS AVAILABLE" and are not retained in our systems. CENGAGE LEARNING AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the machine generated PDF is subject to all use restrictions contained in The Cengage Learning Subscription and License Agreement and/or the Gale OneFile: CPI.Q Terms and Conditions and by using the machine generated PDF functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against Cengage Learning or its licensors for your use of the machine generated PDF functionality and any output derived therefrom. We are water, and water is us; Conference to investigate trauma imposed on people who don't have access to clean water. Date: Jan. 25, 2020 From: The Spectator (Hamilton, Ontario) Publisher: CNW Group Ltd. - Toronto Star Newspapers Document Type: Conference news Length: 697 words Full Text: Byline: Anne Niec and Christine Wekerle The outrage from the community was a swift and unanimous condemnation at the attempt to coverup the news of contamination. It will take millions of dollars and many years to remediate the area. What it will take to repair the broken trust between our partners on the lake remains to be seen. Indigenous women sounded the alarm in 2015 yet their concerns were not considered valid enough to investigate. Collectively and individually, we have suffered trauma through the treatment of the water and its dependent ecosystem. We see this clearly in the deadly effects of mercury poisoning in the water on the people of Grassy Narrows. What many Hamiltonians do not realize, and now might be a good time to highlight, is that just down the highway at Six Nations of the Grand River, most residents, almost 90 per cent according to 2018 reports, do not have running water. Despite having a top-notch water treatment facility, the cost to households for connecting pipes is out-of-reach for most families, topping tens of thousands of dollars. Lack of access to water disproportionately affects infants, children, youth, pregnant women, and those living with social and economic marginalization. Imagine having to travel to public taps to gather water in plastic jugs and then protecting and rationing that water until the next refill trip. Imagine the extra effort it is to keep a clean body covered with clean clothes with no access to clean water. Our young people are already feeling the pressures of their future. Youth place the climate and violence as their top concerns. Is it possible that these two are related? Indigenous wisdom also holds that the trauma experienced by the environment is mirrored in the trauma experienced by the community dependent upon it. That is the symbiotic relationship that represents our connection with and to nature. Sick water creates sick communities, both physically and mentally. How we understand recovery and health of the self needs to be considered in the recovery and health of the water that surrounds us. The Calls for Justice in the Final Report into Indigenous Murdered and Missing Women states: "We further direct that trauma ... programs be paired with other essential services such as mental health services and sexual exploitation and trafficking services as they relate to each individual case of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people." A first step is secured basics for living - access to clean water and understanding the significance of how water not only sustains us materially, but also spiritually. The common ground to water issues, health equity and gender-based violence is exploitation. Exploitation has driven the colonial conquest of Canada's Indigenous peoples as well as informed the resource use and extraction industries. Exploitation fosters a culture of a lack of respect for rights, particularly the rights of Indigenous people. This exploitation is evident by the lack of respect for water that gives and sustains life. Canada has signed off on every global rights document and is a pathfinder country; we are looked to for solutions. Our research group explores the intersections of water, health-equity and gender-based violence to uncover the keys to resilience among Indigenous youth. Resilience, that is, the ability to bounce back, to recover, is what we want to support for youth, all youth, in helping them overcome the adverse experiences in childhood and become healthy members of our communities. We are hosting a conference in March 2020 to share findings, engage in dialogue and advance the agenda of child protection in our most vulnerable communities. We invite all service providers to at-risk youth, policy-makers, to review the program and join us in moving the agenda forward on implementing resilience-based strategies and therapies in community and individual programming. You can find more information here: youthresilience.net. We need to show up now, to have the pieces in place for resilience for our at-risk communities and, as Indigenous wisdom teaches, for the next seven generations of children. Anne Niec, MD, is director of the Child Advocacy and Assessment Program, Gender and Health Education Initiative at McMaster University. Christine Wekerle, PhD, is associate professor, pediatrics at McMaster University Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2020 CNW Group Ltd. - Toronto Star Newspapers. Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd. https://www.cision.ca/ Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition) "We are water, and water is us; Conference to investigate trauma imposed on people who don't have access to clean water." Spectator [Hamilton, Ontario], 25 Jan. 2020, p. A14. Gale OneFile: CPI.Q, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A612187966/CPI?u=toro15002&sid=CPI&xid=9674689a. Accessed 20 Feb. 2021. Gale Document Number: GALE|A612187966
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OUTLINE FOR ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

Outline for Access to clean water
Student
Professor
Course
Date

1

OUTLINE FOR ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

2

Specific Purpose: I want the audience to understand why access to clean water is a problem for
some communities.

Thesis Sentence: Some communities lack access to access to clean water because they are
exploited, groundwater is polluted, and their water systems are not treated.

Introduction

Access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation are important for health, especially among
children. Every day in indigenous communities in Tanzania, Canada, and sub-Saharan Africa,
several people suffer as they cannot access clean and safe water. This is a burden that traps these
people in poverty. Without water, they cannot farm, build houses, stay healthy, stay in school, or
even work. Furthermore, Davis (2019), noted that happiness is measured by access to water.
Access to clean water is, however, a problem for some communities because of groundwater
pollution, exploitation, and lack of treatment of water systems.

Body.
I.

Some communities cannot access clean water because of groundwater pollution.
A. It has been thought that burying people with COVID-19 causes groundwater
pollution (Do Burials of COVID-19 victims cause groundwater pollution?, 2020).
1. Groundwater pollution results in poor drinking water quality and loss of
water supply.
B. Failure of the state scientists to guide people and the government causes untold
human misery.

OUTLINE FOR ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

3

1. Communities are afraid to use water since scientists left without any
scientific substantiation that burial does not cause soil or ground water
contamination.
II.

Access to clean water is a problem for some communities due to exploitation.
A. Exploitation fosters a culture of a lack of respect for rights, especially that of
indigenous people.
1. About 90% of the residents at the highway at Six Nations of the Grand
River do not have running water.
a. Despite having a top-notch water treatment facility, the cost for
connecting pipes is out-of-reach for several families.
B. The exploitation of the environment is mirrored in the trauma experienced by the
community depends upon it.
1. Exposure to mercury poisoning pollutes water.
a. Sick water creates sick communities, both mentally and
physically (Niec & Wekerle, 2020).

III.

While water is can be there, treatment may hinder access to clean water
A. Even after drilling boreholes, samples have to be sent to the laboratory for testing.
1. If water is deemed unsafe, pumps cannot be installed.
B. Communities also complain about the taste of water
1. Even after the water is deemed safe and pumps installed, other people
may find the water tasting bitter and heavy (Teo, 2019).

OUTLINE FOR ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

4

Conclusion
Access to clean water is important that determines people's standards of living and happiness
among other things. However, various pitfalls including groundwater pollution, exploitation, and
lack of treatment of water systems prevent some communities from accessing clean water. There
i...


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