Money and the Prices in the Long Run and Open Economies

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timer Asked: Jan 16th, 2017
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Purpose of Assignment

Week 3 will help students develop an understanding of what money is, what forms money takes, how the banking system helps create money, and how the Federal Reserve controls the quantity of money. Students will learn how the quantity of money affects inflation and interest rates in the long run, and production and employment in the short run. Students will find that, in the long run, there is a strong relationship between the growth rate of money and inflation. Students will review the basic concepts macroeconomists use to study open economies and will address why a nation's net exports must equal its net capital outflow. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the prices and quantities in the market for loanable funds and the prices and quantities in the market for foreign-currency exchange. Student will learn to analyze the impact of a variety of government policies on an economy's exchange rate and trade balance.

Assignment Steps

Resources: National Bureau of Economic Research

Develop a 2,100-word economic outlook forecast that includes the following:

  • Analyze the history of changes in GDP, savings, investment, real interest rates, and unemployment and compare to forecast for the next five years.
  • Discuss how government policies can influence economic growth.
  • Analyze how monetary policy could influence the long-run behavior of price levels, inflation rates, costs, and other real or nominal variables.
  • Describe how trade deficits or surpluses can influence the growth of productivity and GDP.
  • Discuss the importance of the market for loanable funds and the market for foreign-currency exchange to the achievement of the strategic plan.
  • Recommend, based on your above findings, whether the strategic plan can be achieved and provide support.

Use a minimum of three peer-reviewed sources from the University Library.

Format your paper consistent with APA guidelines.

Money and the Prices in the Long Run and Open Economies Grading Guide ECO/372 Version 10 Principles of Macroeconomics Copyright Copyright © 2016, 2015, 2014 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. University of Phoenix® is a registered trademark of Apollo Group, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. Microsoft®, Windows®, and Windows NT® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Use of these marks is not intended to imply endorsement, sponsorship, or affiliation. Edited in accordance with University of Phoenix® editorial standards and practices. Money and the Prices in the Long Run and Open Economies Grading Guide ECO/372 Version 10 Individual Assignment: Money and the Prices in the Long Run and Open Economies Purpose of Assignment Week 3 will help students develop an understanding of what money is, what forms money takes, how the banking system helps create money, and how the Federal Reserve controls the quantity of money. Students will learn how the quantity of money affects inflation and interest rates in the long run, and production and employment in the short run. Students will find that, in the long run, there is a strong relationship between the growth rate of money and inflation. Students will review the basic concepts macroeconomists use to study open economies and will address why a nation’s net exports must equal its net capital outflow. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the prices and quantities in the market for loanable funds and the prices and quantities in the market for foreign-currency exchange. Student will learn to analyze the impact of a variety of government policies on an economy’s exchange rate and trade balance. Resources Required National Bureau of Economic Research Grading Guide Content Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes an analysis of the history of changes in GDP, savings, investment, real interest rates, and unemployment and compare to forecast for the next five years. Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes a discussion of how government policies can influence economic growth. Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes an analysis of how monetary policy could influence the long-run behavior of price levels, inflation rates, costs, and other real or nominal variables. Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes a description of how trade deficits or surpluses can influence the growth of productivity and GDP. Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes a discussion of the importance of the market for loanable funds and the market for foreign-currency exchange to the achievement of the strategic plan. Student developed an economic outlook forecast that includes a recommendation, based on their findings, of whether the strategic plan can be achieved and the student provides support. Met Partially Met Not Met Comments: 2 Money and the Prices in the Long Run and Open Economies Grading Guide ECO/372 Version 10 Content Met Partially Met Not Met Total Available Total Earned 12 #/12 Partially Met Not Met Total Available Total Earned 3 #/3 15 #/15 Comments: The paper is 2,100 words in length. Writing Guidelines Met The paper—including tables and graphs, headings, title page, and reference page—is consistent with APA formatting guidelines and meets course-level requirements. Intellectual property is recognized with in-text citations and a reference page. Paragraph and sentence transitions are present, logical, and maintain the flow throughout the paper. Sentences are complete, clear, and concise. Rules of grammar and usage are followed including spelling and punctuation. Assignment Total Additional comments: # Comments: 3

Tutor Answer

sedonadoc
School: Duke University

I AM so happy to be able to report: 1) I finished the Paper; and, 2) I am feeling better. Thank you for your kind wishes.~ -- sedonadoc ***** -- AND for your infinite patience./

Running head: SHOW ME THE MONEY

Show Me the Money: Exhibiting the Interlacing Underpinnings of Macro-Monetary Policy
Name of Student
Name of Institution

SHOW ME THE MONEY
Show Me the Money: Exhibiting the Interlacing Underpinnings of Macro-Monetary Policy
Those who remember the “old” Tom Cruise minor hit Jerry Maguire at all mostly
remember it for Cuba Gooding Jr.’s zestful character shouting his near-spiritual, soulful
deliverance of a singular, seminal line: “Show me the money!!” (Crowe, 1996, p. 200). In like
manner – and like mind – this student-generated macroeconomics paper will strategically and
systematically explore the manifold ramifications of money, what it means, how it interacts with
other essential economic elements, and how monetary policy interlocks within the bigger picture
– and occasional puzzle – of the grand “scheme” of things. In the midst of that all-encompassing
and well-defining synthesis and symbiotic synergy, one might quite easily imagine Cuba’s
money-grubbing (and grabbing) character wholeheartedly embracing (and participating in) the
show.
Casting a Spotlight on an Array of Five Key Macroeconomic Indicators & Figures in Flux
GDP Growth
Despite a rather raucous fluctuation in boom times (and in bust), the United States’ GDP
growth consistently (recently) hovers at around the three-percent plateau over time; in the past
generation so analyzed, the proverbial “best of times” were the early Fifties and late Seventies
(each optimal occasion between an impressive 15-20 percent), while conversely, “bust” was
defined (and survived) by the 2008-09 Recession in which some figures showed growth rate as
low as negative-8 percent (Trading Economics, 2017, 70-year chart). As always, in all things, the
U.S. proved itself to be a survivor across the spectrum, establishing a 70-year benchmark of 3.23

percent for the duration and proverbial “long haul” (Trading Economics). Most recently, the key
indicator has witnessed its highest performance rate in two years.
Five-year forecast. Steady rather than robust is the watchword of the day, as GDP growth
is forecast to trend at about 2.00 percent by 2020 across all econometric arrays of measurement
(Trading Economics, 2017). Beyond that (2020-2022) is virtually anyone’s guess, as a five-year
GDP outlook is infinitely more complex than a five-day weather forecast, for example.
Sociologist and economists would generally agree, though, that in the U.S. at least, a large
determinant of such fourth- and fifth-year outlook(s) are dependent directly upon the precise
policy outcomes of newly-elected President Donald John Trump.
Household Savings Rate
For purposes of this paper, defined as “figures which correspond to the ratio of personal
income saved to personal net disposable income” (Trading Economics, 2017, 58-year chart),
household savings rate has likewise been reasonably steady at the helm, holding now at 5.5
percent and hitting an all-time high way back in May of booming ’75 (Trading Economics).
Keen economic analysts almost universally agree household savings rate is a good bellwether to
access the entire economy’s potential and stability; i.e., are citizens saving in a “healthy”
manner, or are they frantically squirreling away cash like nuts for the winter? Savings is, by
definition, positive b...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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