Literature Informational Text & Writing Literary Analysis Response Exam Practice

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Description

Learning Targets:

Reading: Literature

I can read closely and find answers explicitly in the text and answers that require aninference.

I can analyze an author’s words and determine multiple pieces of textual evidence that

strongly and thoroughly support both explicit and inferential questions.

I can analyze plot to determine two or more themes.

I can define and identify various forms of figurative language.

I can analyze how an author’s choice of specific words evokes a particular meaning or

tone in a text and how using language in a new way creates an engaging overall effect.

I can analyze how specific word choices build on one another to create a cumulative

impact on the overall meaning and tone of the text.

I can analyze how an author’s choice of structuring specific parts of a text affects the

overall meaning.

---Reading: Informational Text

I can read closely and find answers explicitly in the text and answers that require an

inference.

I can analyze an author’s words and determine multiple pieces of textual evidence that

strongly and thoroughly support both explicit and inferential questions.

I can identify two or more central ideas of a text.

I can determine how an author chose to structure his/her exposition or argument.

I can analyze the structure of an author’s exposition or argument and evaluate whether

the structure is effective.

I can determine if an author’s structure is effective in making his/her points clear,

convincing, and engaging.

I can define rhetoric (a technique an author uses to persuade a reader to consider a topic

from a different perspective).

I can identify when an author uses rhetoric and analyze how the rhetoric strengthens

his/her point of view or purpose.

I can analyze how the author’s style and content contribute to the power,

persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

---Writing

I can present my information maintaining an objective tone and formal style that

includes an introduction that previews what is to follow, supporting details, varied

transitions and syntax, and a concluding statement/section that supports the

information presented.

I can compose a clear and logical piece of writing that demonstrates my

understanding of a specific writing style.

I can compose written responses and include textual evidence to strengthen my

analysis, reflection, and/or research.

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English 12 Term 2 Exam Your term 2 exam will consist of two sections: Literary Analysis and Response to Literature. Each section will include a reading passage and will be marked out of 50 marks. Learning Targets: Reading: Literature • I can read closely and find answers explicitly in the text and answers that require an inference. • I can analyze an author’s words and determine multiple pieces of textual evidence that strongly and thoroughly support both explicit and inferential questions. • I can analyze plot to determine two or more themes. • I can define and identify various forms of figurative language. • I can analyze how an author’s choice of specific words evokes a particular meaning or tone in a text and how using language in a new way creates an engaging overall effect. • I can analyze how specific word choices build on one another to create a cumulative impact on the overall meaning and tone of text. • I can analyze how an author’s choice of structuring specific parts of a text affects the overall meaning. Reading: Informational Text • I can read closely and find answers explicitly in the text and answers that require an inference. • I can analyze an author’s words and determine multiple pieces of textual evidence that strongly and thoroughly support both explicit and inferential questions. • I can identify two or more central ideas of a text. • I can determine how an author chose to structure his/her exposition or argument. • I can analyze the structure of an author’s exposition or argument and evaluate whether the structure is effective. • I can determine if an author’s structure is effective in making his/her points clear, convincing, and engaging. • I can define rhetoric (a technique an author uses to persuade a reader to consider a topic from a different perspective). • I can identify when an author uses rhetoric and analyze how the rhetoric strengthens his/her point of view or purpose. • I can analyze how the author’s style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. Writing • • • I can present my information maintaining an objective tone and formal style that includes an introduction that previews what is to follow, supporting details, varied transitions and syntax, and a concluding statement/section that supports the information presented. I can compose a clear and logical piece of writing that demonstrates my understanding of a specific writing style. I can compose written responses and include textual evidence to strengthen my analysis, reflection, and/or research. 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 …The windows were open and the room was filled with loud, unearthly shrieks. Mrs. Munson lived on the third floor, and across the street was a public school playground. In the late afternoon the noise was almost unbearable. God, if she’d only known about this before she signed the lease! With a little grunt she closed both windows and as far as she was concerned they could stay that way for the next two years. But Mrs. Munson was far too excited to be really annoyed. Vini Rondo was coming to see her, imagine, Vini Rondo.…and this very afternoon! When she thought about it she felt fluttering wings in her stomach. It had been almost five years, and Vini had been in Europe all this time. Whenever Mrs. Munson found herself in a group discussing the war she invariably announced, “Well, you know I have a very dear friend in Paris this very minute, Vini Rondo, she was right there when the Germans marched in! I have positive nightmares when I think what she must be going through!” Mrs. Munson said it as if it were she whose fate lay in the balance. … “Vini, back in America,” she thought, never ceasing to revel in the wonder of it. She puffed up the small green pillows on the couch and sat down. With piercing eyes she examined her room. Funny you never really see your surroundings until a visitor is expected. Well, Mrs. Munson sighed contentedly, that new girl had, for a rarity, restored pre-war standards. The door-bell rang abruptly. It buzzed twice before Mrs. Munson could move, she was that excited. Finally she composed herself and went to answer. At first Mrs. Munson didn’t recognize her. The woman who confronted her had no chic up-swept coiffure … indeed her hair hung rather limply and had an uncombed look. A print dress in January? Mrs. Munson tried to keep the disappointment out of her voice when she said, “Vini, darling, I should have known you anywhere.” The woman still stood in the threshold. Under her arm she carried a large pink box and her grey eyes looked out at Mrs. Munson curiously. “Would you, Bertha?” Her voice was a queer whisper. “That’s nice, very nice. I should have recognized you, too, although you’ve gotten rather fat. [sic] haven’t you?” Then she accepted Mrs. Munson’s extended hand and came in. … Vini smiled and Mrs. Munson noticed how irregular her teeth were and decided they could do with a good brushing. “So,” Vini continued, “when I got back in New York last week I thought of you at once. I had an awful time trying to find you because I couldn’t remember your husband’s first name.…” “Albert,” Mrs. Munson put in unnecessarily. “… but I finally did and here I am. You know, Bertha, I really started thinking about you when I decided to get rid of my mink coat.” Mrs. Munson saw a sudden blush on Vini’s face. “Your mink coat?” “Yes,” Vini said, lifting up the pink box. “You remember my mink coat. You always admired it so. You always said it was the loveliest coat you’d ever seen.” She started to undo the frayed silk ribbon that held the box together. “Of course, yes of course,” Mrs. Munson said, letting the “course” trill down softly. 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 “I said to myself, ‘Vini Rondo, what on earth do you need that coat for? Why not let Bertha have it?’ You see, Bertha, I bought the most gorgeous sable in Paris and you can understand that I really don’t need two fur coats. Besides I have my silver-fox jacket.” Mrs. Munson watched her parting the tissue paper in the box, saw the chipped enamel on her nails, saw that her fingers were jewel-less, and suddenly realized a great many other things. “So I thought of you and unless you want it I’ll just keep it because I couldn’t bear to think of anyone else having it.” She held the coat and stood turning it this way and that. It was a beautiful coat; the fur shone rich and very smooth. Mrs. Munson reached out and ran her fingers across it ruffling the tiny hairs the wrong way. Without thinking she said: “How much?” Mrs. Munson brought back her hand quickly, as though she had touched fire, and then she heard Vini’s voice, small and tired. “I paid almost a thousand for it. Is a thousand too much?” Down in the street Mrs. Munson could hear the deafening roar of the playground and for once she was grateful. It gave her something else to concentrate on, something to lessen the intensity of her own feelings. “I’m afraid that’s too much. I really can’t afford it,” Mrs. Munson said distractedly, still staring at the coat, afraid to lift her eyes and see the other woman’s face. Vini tossed the coat on the couch. “Well, I want you to have it. It’s not so much the money, but I feel I should get something back on my investment.…How much could you afford?” Mrs. Munson closed her eyes. Oh, God, this was awful! Just plain damned awful! “Maybe four hundred,” she answered weakly. … Vini leaned against the wall, her pale face looking hard in the magnified sunlight of the big bedroom windows. “You can make out the check to me,” she said disinterestedly. “Yes, of course,” Mrs. Munson said, suddenly coming back to earth. Imagine Bertha Munson with a mink of her own! They went back into the livingroom and she wrote the check for Vini. Carefully folding it, Vini deposited it in her small beaded purse. Mrs. Munson tried hard to make conversation but she came up against a cold wall at each new channel. Once she asked, “Where is your husband, Vini? You must bring him around for Albert to talk to.” And Vini answered, “Oh, him! I haven’t seen him for aeons. He’s still in Lisbon for all I know.” And so that was that. Finally, after promising to phone the next day, Vini left. When she had gone Mrs. Munson thought, “Why, poor Vini, she’s nothing but a refugee!” Then she took her new coat and went into the bedroom. She couldn’t tell Albert how she got it, that was definite. My, but he would be mad about the money! She decided to hide it in the furthest reaches of her closet and then one day she’d bring it out and say, “Albert look at the divine mink I bought at an auction. I got it for next to nothing.” Groping in the darkness of her closet she caught the coat on a hook. She gave a little yank and was terrified to hear the sound of ripping. Quickly she snapped on the light and saw that the sleeve was torn. She held the tear apart and pulled slightly. It ripped more and 90 then some more. With a sick emptiness she knew the whole thing was rotten. “Oh, my God [sic] she said, clutching at the linen rose in her hair, “Oh, my God, I’ve been taken and taken good, and there’s nothing in the world I can do about it, nothing in the world!” For suddenly Mrs. Munson realized Vini wouldn’t phone tomorrow or ever again. —Truman Capote excerpted from “A Mink of One’s Own” Decade of Short Stories, 1944 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 …The windows were open and the room was filled with loud, unearthly shrieks. Mrs. Munson lived on the third floor, and across the street was a public school playground. In the late afternoon the noise was almost unbearable. God, if she’d only known about this before she signed the lease! With a little grunt she closed both windows and as far as she was concerned they could stay that way for the next two years. But Mrs. Munson was far too excited to be really annoyed. Vini Rondo was coming to see her, imagine, Vini Rondo.…and this very afternoon! When she thought about it she felt fluttering wings in her stomach. It had been almost five years, and Vini had been in Europe all this time. Whenever Mrs. Munson found herself in a group discussing the war she invariably announced, “Well, you know I have a very dear friend in Paris this very minute, Vini Rondo, she was right there when the Germans marched in! I have positive nightmares when I think what she must be going through!” Mrs. Munson said it as if it were she whose fate lay in the balance. … “Vini, back in America,” she thought, never ceasing to revel in the wonder of it. She puffed up the small green pillows on the couch and sat down. With piercing eyes she examined her room. Funny you never really see your surroundings until a visitor is expected. Well, Mrs. Munson sighed contentedly, that new girl had, for a rarity, restored pre-war standards. The door-bell rang abruptly. It buzzed twice before Mrs. Munson could move, she was that excited. Finally she composed herself and went to answer. At first Mrs. Munson didn’t recognize her. The woman who confronted her had no chic up-swept coiffure … indeed her hair hung rather limply and had an uncombed look. A print dress in January? Mrs. Munson tried to keep the disappointment out of her voice when she said, “Vini, darling, I should have known you anywhere.” The woman still stood in the threshold. Under her arm she carried a large pink box and her grey eyes looked out at Mrs. Munson curiously. “Would you, Bertha?” Her voice was a queer whisper. “That’s nice, very nice. I should have recognized you, too, although you’ve gotten rather fat. [sic] haven’t you?” Then she accepted Mrs. Munson’s extended hand and came in. … Vini smiled and Mrs. Munson noticed how irregular her teeth were and decided they could do with a good brushing. “So,” Vini continued, “when I got back in New York last week I thought of you at once. I had an awful time trying to find you because I couldn’t remember your husband’s first name.…” “Albert,” Mrs. Munson put in unnecessarily. “… but I finally did and here I am. You know, Bertha, I really started thinking about you when I decided to get rid of my mink coat.” Mrs. Munson saw a sudden blush on Vini’s face. “Your mink coat?” “Yes,” Vini said, lifting up the pink box. “You remember my mink coat. You always admired it so. You always said it was the loveliest coat you’d ever seen.” She started to undo the frayed silk ribbon that held the box together. “Of course, yes of course,” Mrs. Munson said, letting the “course” trill down softly. 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 “I said to myself, ‘Vini Rondo, what on earth do you need that coat for? Why not let Bertha have it?’ You see, Bertha, I bought the most gorgeous sable in Paris and you can understand that I really don’t need two fur coats. Besides I have my silver-fox jacket.” Mrs. Munson watched her parting the tissue paper in the box, saw the chipped enamel on her nails, saw that her fingers were jewel-less, and suddenly realized a great many other things. “So I thought of you and unless you want it I’ll just keep it because I couldn’t bear to think of anyone else having it.” She held the coat and stood turning it this way and that. It was a beautiful coat; the fur shone rich and very smooth. Mrs. Munson reached out and ran her fingers across it ruffling the tiny hairs the wrong way. Without thinking she said: “How much?” Mrs. Munson brought back her hand quickly, as though she had touched fire, and then she heard Vini’s voice, small and tired. “I paid almost a thousand for it. Is a thousand too much?” Down in the street Mrs. Munson could hear the deafening roar of the playground and for once she was grateful. It gave her something else to concentrate on, something to lessen the intensity of her own feelings. “I’m afraid that’s too much. I really can’t afford it,” Mrs. Munson said distractedly, still staring at the coat, afraid to lift her eyes and see the other woman’s face. Vini tossed the coat on the couch. “Well, I want you to have it. It’s not so much the money, but I feel I should get something back on my investment.…How much could you afford?” Mrs. Munson closed her eyes. Oh, God, this was awful! Just plain damned awful! “Maybe four hundred,” she answered weakly. … Vini leaned against the wall, her pale face looking hard in the magnified sunlight of the big bedroom windows. “You can make out the check to me,” she said disinterestedly. “Yes, of course,” Mrs. Munson said, suddenly coming back to earth. Imagine Bertha Munson with a mink of her own! They went back into the livingroom and she wrote the check for Vini. Carefully folding it, Vini deposited it in her small beaded purse. Mrs. Munson tried hard to make conversation but she came up against a cold wall at each new channel. Once she asked, “Where is your husband, Vini? You must bring him around for Albert to talk to.” And Vini answered, “Oh, him! I haven’t seen him for aeons. He’s still in Lisbon for all I know.” And so that was that. Finally, after promising to phone the next day, Vini left. When she had gone Mrs. Munson thought, “Why, poor Vini, she’s nothing but a refugee!” Then she took her new coat and went into the bedroom. She couldn’t tell Albert how she got it, that was definite. My, but he would be mad about the money! She decided to hide it in the furthest reaches of her closet and then one day she’d bring it out and say, “Albert look at the divine mink I bought at an auction. I got it for next to nothing.” Groping in the darkness of her closet she caught the coat on a hook. She gave a little yank and was terrified to hear the sound of ripping. Quickly she snapped on the light and saw that the sleeve was torn. She held the tear apart and pulled slightly. It ripped more and 90 then some more. With a sick emptiness she knew the whole thing was rotten. “Oh, my God [sic] she said, clutching at the linen rose in her hair, “Oh, my God, I’ve been taken and taken good, and there’s nothing in the world I can do about it, nothing in the world!” For suddenly Mrs. Munson realized Vini wouldn’t phone tomorrow or ever again. —Truman Capote excerpted from “A Mink of One’s Own” Decade of Short Stories, 1944 Response to Literature Rubric Criteria /Score Content and Analysis Command of Level 5 (40-50 points) A response at this Level 4 (30-39 points) A response at this Level 3 (20-29 points) A response at this Level 2 (10-19 points) A response at this Level 1 (0-9 points) A response at this level: level: level: level: level: -Introduce a wellreasoned central idea and a writing strategy that clearly establish the criteria for analysis. -Introduce a clear central idea and a writing strategy that establish the criteria for analysis -Introduce a central idea and/or a writing strategy -Demonstrate a thoughtful analysis of the author’s use of the writing strategy to develop the central idea. -Demonstrate a superficial analysis of -Demonstrate an the author’s use of the appropriate analysis of writing strategy to the author’s use of the develop the central idea writing strategy to develop the central idea -Present ideas clearly and consistently, -Present ideas sufficiently, making -Present ideas inconsistently, -Introduce a confused or incomplete central idea or writing strategy and/or demonstrate a minimal analysis of the author’s use of the writing strategy to develop the central idea -Present little or no evidence from the • • • • A personal response and makes little or no reference to the task or text. A response that is totally copied from the text with no original writing. A response that is totally unrelated to the task, illegible, incoherent, blank, or unrecognizable as English. A personal Response to Literature Rubric Evidence making effective use of adequate use of specific and relevant relevant evidence to evidence to support support analysis analysis inadequately, and/or inaccurately in an attempt to support analysis, making use of some evidence that may be irrelevant text • • Coherence, Organization, and Style -Exhibit logical organization of ideas and information to create a cohesive and coherent response -Exhibit acceptable organization of ideas and information to create a coherent response -Establish and maintain -Establish and -Exhibit inconsistent organization of ideas and information, failing to create a coherent response -Lack a formal style, -Exhibit little organization of ideas and information -Use language that is predominantly incoherent, • • response and makes little or no reference to the task or text. A response that is totally copied from the text with no original writing. A response that is totally unrelated to the task, illegible, incoherent, blank, or unrecognizable as English. A personal response and makes little or no reference to the task or text. A response that is totally copied Response to Literature Rubric a formal style, using precise language and sound structure maintain a formal style, using appropriate language and structure using language that is basic, inappropriate, or imprecise inappropriate, or copied directly from the task or text -Are minimal, making assessment unreliable Control of Conventions -Demonstrate control -Demonstrate partial of the conventions with control of conventions infrequent errors with occasional errors that do not hinder comprehension -Demonstrate emerging control of conventions with some errors that hinder comprehension -Demonstrate a lack of control of conventions with frequent errors that make comprehension difficult -Are minimal, making assessment of conventions unreliable • • • • from the text with no original writing. A response that is totally unrelated to the task, illegible, incoherent, blank, or unrecognizable as English. A personal response and makes little or no reference to the task or text. A response that is totally copied from the text with no original writing. A response that is totally unrelated to the Response to Literature Rubric task, illegible, incoherent, blank, or unrecognizable as English. The following excerpt is from the 2013 Duke University commencement address, given by Melinda Gates, co-founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 …The people who say technology has disconnected you from others are wrong. So are the people who say technology automatically connects you to others. Technology is just a tool. It’s a powerful tool, but it’s just a tool. Deep human connection is very different. It’s not a tool. It’s not a means to an end. It is the end—the purpose and the result of a meaningful life—and it will inspire the most amazing acts of love, generosity, and humanity. In his famous speech “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Through our scientific and technological genius, we have made of this world a neighborhood and yet we have not had the ethical commitment to make of it a brotherhood.”… What does it mean to make of this world a brotherhood and a sisterhood? That probably sounds like a lot to ask of you as individuals, or even as a graduating class. I’m pretty sure none of you will respond to the annoying question “What are you going to do after graduation?” by saying “I plan to have the ethical commitment to make of this world a brotherhood.” But you can change the way you think about other people. You can choose to see their humanity first—the one big thing that makes them the same as you, instead of the many things that make them different from you. … Paul Farmer, the Duke graduate I admire most, is a testament to the deep human connection I’m talking about. As many of you know, Paul, who’s here today, is a doctor and global health innovator. For years, he travelled back and forth from Boston, where he is a professor of medicine, to Haiti, where he ran a health clinic giving the highest quality care to the poorest people in the world. Now, he lives mostly in Rwanda, where he’s working on changing the country’s entire health care system. I first met Paul in 2003, when I went to see him in Haiti. It took us forever to walk the 100 yards from our vehicle to the clinic because he introduced me to every single person we met along the way. I am not exaggerating. Every single person. As we moved along, he introduced each person to me by first and last name, wished their families well, and asked for an update about their lives. He hugged people when he greeted them and looked them in the eyes throughout each conversation. If you believe love plays a role in healing, there was healing happening at every step of that journey. … Of course, not everybody is Paul Farmer. Not everybody is going to dedicate their whole life to connecting with the poorest people in the world. But just because you don’t qualify for sainthood doesn’t mean you can’t form deep human connections—or that your connections can’t make a difference in the world. That’s where technology comes in. If you make the moral choice to connect deeply to others, then your computer, your phone, and your tablet make it so much easier to do. Today, there are 700 million cell phone subscribers in Africa. I travelled to Kenya recently and spent a day in Kibera, which many people consider the largest slum in Africa. One image that sticks with me is all the cell phones piled up in a small kiosk where locals paid to recharge their batteries. Most people in Kibera don’t have electricity—even the cell phone charging businesses steal it from the city’s power grid—but everywhere I looked young people were on their phones. And guess what they were doing? Exactly what you do… they were texting. You and they can share your stories directly with each other, with literally billions of people, because you’re all using the same technology. … When my husband Bill [Gates] and I started our foundation, we didn’t know much about global health at all. I read the academic literature and talked to experts in the field. But most of what I 45 50 1 learned was expressed in morbidity and mortality rates, not in flesh and blood. So in 2001, I took my first foundation learning trip, to India and Thailand, to meet with people and find out what their lives were really like behind the veil of statistics. … Late in the afternoon, one of the women who’d been showing me around invited me into her home. We went inside and she produced two lawn chairs that were hanging from a nail in her kitchen. They were the aluminum folding kind with the itchy fabric seat you’ve sat on a million 2 55 60 65 70 75 times, quite possibly when you were tenting in Krzyzewskiville. When I was growing up in Dallas, we had the same chairs. On Sunday nights in the summer, my parents and my siblings and I used to set them up on our back patio and gaze up into the sky together as a family. It turned out my host wanted to show me her stunning view of the Himalayas, and as we sat and contemplated the planet’s highest peaks, we talked about our children and the future. Our aspirations were basically the same. We wanted our children to fulfill their potential. We wanted the love and respect of family and friends. We wanted meaningful work. The biggest difference between us was not what we dreamt about, but how hard it was for her to make her dreams come true. Some people assume that Bill and I are too rich to make a connection with someone who’s poor, even if our intentions are good. But adjectives like rich and poor don’t define who any of us truly are as human beings. And they don’t make any one individual less human than the next. The universe is like computer code in that way. Binary. There is life, and there is everything else. Zeroes and ones. I’m a one. You’re a one. My friend in the Himalayas is a one. Martin Luther King was not a computer programmer, so he called this concept a brotherhood. His hope was that college students could bring a brotherhood into being. Dr. King thought the world had shrunk as much as it was going to shrink—in his words, we’d “dwarfed distance and placed time in chains.” So the fact that people still didn’t treat each other like brothers and sisters was, to him, an ethical failure. I take a slightly different view. I believe we are finally creating the scientific and technological tools to turn the world into a neighborhood. And that gives you an amazing ethical opportunity no one has ever had before. You can light up a network of 7 billion people with long-lasting and highly motivating human connections. … I hope you will use the tool of technology to do what you already had it in your heart to do… To connect… To make of this world a brotherhood… and a sisterhood… I can’t wait to see what it looks like when you do. … —Melinda Gates excerpted and adapted from “Melinda Gates: Duke Commencement 2013” www.gatesfoundation.org, 2013 1 morbidity — the rate at which an illness occurs 2 Krzyzewskiville — The annual tent city that is erected in celebration of the Duke versus UNC basketball game
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Melinda Gates, in her speech, shows how adamant, divisive, and destructive technology
is towards humanity. The analogy and simile are used all over the text to emphasize the physical
connection that human beings desire to have and that which they shou...


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