Brandeis University Moonlight 2016 Film Multimodal Script Paper

User Generated

Yvfn9090

Humanities

Brandeis University

Description

There will be three files attached. One is the prompt. One is a sample multimodal script. One is mine work which is half way done. Please follow the instructions and requirements in the file to finalize it. Please also help me to revise the parts that I have finished up. To do this project, please watch the movie Moonlight first.

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Amber Childhood experiences often affect your whole life. In the other words, it is also a guide to help you achieve self-realization. Treat all the terrible stories happened in your life as lessons to promote yourself. Clips: Little Chiron who’s young, black, queer found an empty place to escape the bully. This scene have been noticed by Juan— a drug dealer. Amber Race and sexual orientation are the hottest topics discussed in the media contemporarily. Like always, we are appealing for equal treatments of LGBTQ and all races. However, incidents of hatred and bullying have emerged in endlessly. Sadly, just like the character Chiron in the movie Moonlight, at an age when he still couldn't recognize his own orientation, he just felt that he was different from others. He thinks being bullied is a normal thing. These situations leads us to a question, in this age that we are unable to change the society what can we do to achieve self-realization and selfacceptance. Being LGBTQ, People may need guidances to support them spiritually and to fight against or ignore people who hatred them. There are still people at the confusing stage to believe that it is their fault to become queer. They are enduring tags that shouldn’t be given to them. Amber The first time that I watched this movie is four years ago. It is the first LGBTQ film and the first film with an all-black cast to win the Oscar for Best Picture. I ignored the important scene about the conversation between Juan and Chiron on the beach. Several days ago, I rewatched the movie. I realized that this conversation brings out the theme. The man Juan tells Chiron a story that he has been told by a white old lady that in the moonlight black boys are blue. Chiron asks Juan that if his name is Blue. Juan said no. Juan tells him that at some point in your life, you should make decisions for yourself about what you want to be. Others cannot decide for you. At this point, the movie uses metaphor to express that other cannot name you by how you look like just like all the decision you made are upon to yourself. You don’t have to care about what others say. By experiencing many things, you will decide for yourself. Amber: In my point of view, I don’t like to say that they are blue in the moonlight. More often then ever, blue is the color to express a sad and melancholy mood. Maybe at this time, the movie also wants us to change the stereotype of queer. They have rights to live for themselves. They are not blue. TITLE: Part 1 — Self-acceptance —“who am I” Clip: A discussion about becoming what kind of person in the future between little Chiron and Juan. At this stage of the movie, Chiron is still at childhood stage. He is luck that he meets Juan who would like to become his mental guide. Developing a healthy sense of sense and figuring out how LGBTQ fit into socially is a fundamental stage in their childhood and adolescence. What happened in these stages can continue into adulthood. They need supportive people around them who understand and encourage them when they are young. Amber: Self-acceptance is a difficult step for most LGBTQ. As I mentioned before, having a mental guide or someone who encourage you is important. In the clip, it is not hard to tell that Chiron has been ignored in his childhood. His mother does drug and she is a sex worker. So, for Chiron without a caregiver that he can rely on, feeling of inferiority makes achieve selfacceptance even harder for him. As Chiron understands what his mama does for living, he feels shame and guilty. The bulling and shame are childhood trauma to him. Self-acceptance applies to not only LGBTQ but everyone, the concept is harder to achieve. People usually accept others by what they show us from the outside. The fully accept and embrace someone for who they are on the inside is more important. Only people who achieve self-acceptance are able to live for who they are. Clip: Juan accidentally saw Chiron’s mom is doing drug in the car with another man. He is so angry and arguing with his mom. At the same point, he feels guilty since he is a drug dealer. Juan thinks that if his mom doesn’t do drug, Chiron will be well protected. Once Chiron’s mom get back home and she stared at Chiron without saying anything. The eyes of the mother and son is full of hatred of each other. As Chiron gets into high school, he still bullied by other students. Kevin is the only one who would like to talk to Chiron. They sit together in the moonlight on the beach. In their conversation, they imply goodwill for each other. Kevin let Chiron try to do drug. So far, Chiron is still a cowardly and confused boy. However, he has special attachment to Kevin. They kiss each other in the moonlight. Chiron is still not willing to express his own thinking to others. He is not brave enough to do what he want to do. Kevin gives him a chance help him a give self-realization in some point. Clip The students who bully Chiron thought Kevin is a gay. Kevin wants to prove that he is not. Those students ask Kevin to hit Chiron at school. Chiron doesn’t fight back since he likes Kevin. In his eyes, there are disappointment and hopelessness. Kevin wants to approve that he is not a gay. So, he hit the Chiron. Even though he doesn’t clearly say that he likes Chiron, Chiron has already treat him like a best friend. Hitting by the only people who could understand him is a big challenge for Chiron. Clip: The teacher wants Chiron to identify who hurt him. Chiron chooses to keep silent. This is a turning point of his life. He thought that he find the one that he loves. He could not accept hit by his lover. He will fight back. Clip: Chiron chooses to fight against the one who keep bullying him. He has been taken away by the police. As he becomes a man, he named himself Black. He comes back home and see his mom. His mom tells him that she loves him. Even though Chiron has been ignored by his mom in the childhood, he choose to forgive that. Clip; Chiron meets up with Kevin. They forgive each other for what happened in high school. Now Chiron lives for what he wants. Imitation Project This assignment asks you to compose a multimodal text that joins an ongoing public conversation related to the course genre, and achieves a particular argumentative purpose: expository, critical (analytical), or persuasive. Why a multimodal text? Human communication in general has always relied on more than just language to convey meaning--we communicate with our tone of voice and our body language, with drawings and music and other artistic media, and in many other nonverbal ways. And in recent years, as public discourse about culture, society, and politics has moved largely online, people have more opportunities than ever to employ a dynamic mixture of linguistic, visual, aural, spatial, and gestural modes to craft their messages and affect their audiences. In writing classes like ours, we describe this manner of communicating as multimodal, though the term multimedia may be more familiar to you. This project offers a chance to analyze and experiment with the affordances (that is, the opportunities and limitations) of different modes in your writing, and thereby help you apply your genre and rhetorical awareness to situations and debates outside the WR 39B classroom. Multimodal Video Review Essay For this project, you will compose a review essay in the format of a multimodal script. Your review essay should examine and evaluate a piece of media of your choice (such as a film, television series/episode, video game, podcast, or other media). Craft a project that converses with your chosen piece of media and analyzes how it addresses the question of LGBTQ+ representation (whatever that question means in the context of the object you have chosen. It is recommended to select a piece of media about which there has been some discussion, controversy, or debate about queer representation—but you are free to select any piece of media as long as you are able to Requirements Length: The Imitation Project can be a 2000-word multimodal script. The multimodal script option must contain captioned visual material of some kind, along with “stage directions” and descriptions of clips and a voiceover element. Sources: You will be provided with genre models and other relevant sources for composing your project. Genre models will illustrate key conventions and modal affordances you should analyze as part of your composing process. Other sources may provide information about the relevant discourse community and context that will guide your project, and/or competing perspectives that your project might respond to. These sources may be assigned reading, or included in a class bibliography. Process: As you compose your project, you will submit the following process assignments, which are intended to help you continue to cultivate the analytical and argumentative skills and genre and rhetorical knowledge you began to develop in the Genre Analysis essay. ● A project proposal in which you articulate the relevant context and discourse community that will shape your project; describe the project’s intended message and purpose, key genre conventions, modalities (linguistic, aural, visual, spatial, gestural), and other significant rhetorical strategies (e.g., style, tone, point of view, etc.); and explain how this project will purposefully join a larger conversation within your assigned discourse community and respond to a specific context. ● A craft essay in which you analyze your project’s key rhetorical choices, genre conventions, and modalities, explaining how the style of its language, visuals, sound, or any other modal elements are intended to appeal to the specific concerns, values, desires, and/or assumptions of your audience, and why they are appropriate for the occasion and venue. This craft essay may integrate sources provided by your instructor. Multiple drafts, peer review, and substantive revision are required elements of the assignment. Missing or incomplete drafts and process work will result in a grade penalty on the final draft, up to and including failure. Knowledge Practices & Processes By the time you complete this assignment, you should be able to: ● Analyze relationships between medium, genre, purpose, audience, and context in appropriate genre models ● Analyze the affordances of different modes (linguistic, visual, aural, spatial, gestural) in appropriate genre models ● Develop a complex message that engages substantively with other voices and ideas, using genre-appropriate language and at least one other mode of communication (visual, aural, spatial, gestural) ● Credit the original ideas and work of others through proper attribution and citation, according to the conventions of the specific genre ● Give productive feedback on peers’ writing-in-progress; prioritize and implement feedback received from instructor and peers to revise effectively over multiple drafts SCOTTY When do yesterday’s gay political struggles become today’s dad jokes? Clip: Bow’s dads, Lance and George, make terrible puns SCOTTY Contemporary media has given us a new generation of LGBTQ+ role models to choose from. And while many in the past have decried questions about “representation” as pointless, purely symbolic, or even outright distractions from real political struggles, there’s no question that film, television, and other visual and interactive media have become new spaces for pitched battles and debates over queer representation. More often than ever, we are driven to ask: what counts as good, or desirable, or politically viable representation? To what extent does good representation equate to didactic representation? What kind of examples must queer people be, and what kinds of narratives are we allowed to participate in? Clip: Double Trouble, non-binary character introduced in the show’s fourth season SCOTTY (V.O) …These are the questions that motivate SheRa and the Princesses of Power, a 2018 animated fantasy drama on Netflix. Now, SheRa is a show that’s positively packed with queer representation, giving prominent roles to trans women and nonbinary characters, not to mention the climactic kiss at the end of the show’s final episode. But I think this episode in particular is worth mention. The episode I want to look at is “Reunion,” the finale of the show’s second season, and one of its most widely praised episodes. And I think in particular, this episode highlights some of the most badly needed representation on television today: gay parents who are people of color, raising a non-heterosexual child. Its plot revolves around the character Bow, one of the show’s three main characters. Bow is keeping a secret from his dads, George and Lance, and in this effort he is aided his two queer friends and comrades, Adora and Glimmer. Bow’s parents, both academics, have ambitions for their son to become a historian, while Bow, unbeknownst to them, has other plans. Discontented with his parents’ political quietism, Bow runs away, under the pretense of joining the fake Academy of Historic Enterprises, to fight for the alliance of princesses, a resistance army dedicated to fighting the armies of Hordak, who threatens to crush Eternia. What begins as a farcical secret-keeping plot culminates in a battle with an ancient creature, forcing Bow to reveal his secret to his parents. The episode is thus a kind of coming-out story, in which the roles of sexual identity and secrecy are altered so that the disapproving parents are gay men, and the child who comes out is not gay, but rather bisexual, and what he is hiding is not a sexual identity but a political one. The episode is heartwarming, moving, and features some of the most well-written queer characters I’ve ever seen. SCOTTY …But beyond the positive representations themselves, I think this episode can also teach us something about the changing role of this kind of narrative or scene in the broader history of LGBTQ+ politics. While this episode has garnered well-earned critical praise, it also has something to say about the question of what voices get represented, who gets to speak, and what kind of history they get to claim. TITLE: Part 1 - Normalization SCOTTY Now, what I’m not going to do in this episode is offer a critique of She-Ra. Frankly, I don’t know if that’s what we need. The potential is there—from the use of non-human characters to represent nonbinary people, to the way it handles disability and non-neurotypical representation. But that’s not what I want to focus on. What I want to do instead is suggest that this episode might challenge our demand for purely affirmational representation—that is, representation that promises to make us look good, normal, and acceptable in the eyes of heterosexual culture. Despite a long history of debates over assimilation, there’s no question right now that normalizing queer representation has become a political good. Even from the outset, of the episode, we are presented with the problem of the normal. The normal is a screen. It covers over something hidden. It presents itself as pure surface, pure appearance. Clip: Bow keeps secrets not just from his dads but from his friends; yet everything still looks “normal” SCOTTY (V.O.) Normality creates expectations, but it also depends on them. Ultimately, we are led to understand that pretending to be normal isn’t just putting up a screen to hide from homophobic violence, but also covering over a true and authentic self, even from one’s own queer allies. A persistent theme in coming-out stories is painful secretkeeping. At several points in the episode, the dialogue mirrors the language of being in the closet, of hiding authentic identity from authority figures in order to give the appearance of normality. The precedent for this challenge to the normal is based in the history of gay rights protests. During the gay liberation movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s, coming out was often written about as a political act. Images: Gay liberation materials related to coming out; COME OUT! MAGAZINE, Editorial 1 (1970) and flyer for a Coming Out Group (1979), California Historical Society collection of GLF ephemera Still, there is a remarkable difference between the rhetorical style of “coming out” during gay lib and that of the contemporary coming-out story on a show like She-Ra. A core principle of these early demands to come out was the necessity of being public about one’s sexual identity. To be public about being gay was to fly deliberately in the face of the middle-class respectability, and against the demands for gays to act like heterosexuals, or to keep their sexuality hidden in private. In the book, Epistemology of the Closet, the literary critic Eve Sedgwick describes how, in the twentieth century, the closet became a durable and widespread metaphor not just for homosexual secrets, but for secrecy itself: TITLE shows the following quote against a black background WOMAN’S VOICE (as SEDGWICK) Even at an individual level, there are remarkably few of even the most openly gay people who are not deliberately in the closet with someone personally or economically or institutionally important to them. Furthermore, the deadly elasticity of heterosexist presumption means that, like Wendy in Peter Pan, people find new walls springing up around them even as they drowse: every encounter with a classful of students, to say nothing of a new boss, social worker, loan officer, landlord, doctor, erects new closets whose fraught and characteristic laws of optics and physics exact from at least gay people new surveys, new calculations, new draughts and requisitions of secrecy or disclosure …The epistemology of the closet has also been, however, on a far vaster scale and with less honorific inflection, inexhaustibly productive of modern Western culture and history at large (67-68). SCOTTY Part of Sedgwick’s argument is that the metaphor of sexual secrecy has come to structure many of our interactions around the very idea of being hidden. In the contemporary context, however, in which political victories like marriage equality have made it more possible than ever for middle- and upper-class gays, often cis, often white, to live out fantasies of assimilation and respectability outside of the closet, this metaphor has changed. Yet these fantasies are not accessible for all. SCOTTY (V.O.) Indeed, the normalization of a limited subset of sexual identities has perhaps made it increasingly difficult for sexuality to be transgressive at all. Instead, many have adapted the language of the closet, and of coming out, to a whole host of political uses. In She-Ra, for example, while the phrases “coming out” and “the closet” are never used outright, Bow’s secret identity is dramatized in dialogue that sounds very familiar: Clip: Bow’s narrative follows the beats of a classic coming out story, with an arc that bends from secrecy and toward truthtelling SCOTTY (V.O.) Bow’s secret is not just any secret, then, but a secret that resembles living a hidden life as an LGBTQ+ person. In these kinds of stories, the basic concept of the closet is expanded to encompass a wide swath of social and political identities. When it comes to the question of Bow’s identity, for example, it is not his bisexuality that is at issue, but his involvement with Brightmoon, and his professional choice to be a soldier, rather than a scholar. Lance and George disapprove of the Princess Alliance, George in particular because he fought in the old wars against the horde, and witnessed firsthand the failure of the old Alliance. But when Bow finally does come out, in a big speech to his parents following the fight with the creature. Clip: Bow asserts his identity—not as gay but as a soldier fighting in the rebellion—to his dads. Clip: Bow’s dads respond with love and acceptance The episode thus offers a more redemptive coming-out than the standard twentieth century tragic drama of parental disownment. But in doing so, it also stages a different drama, one in which the closet is not something unique to a historically particular moment or a specific lived experience of marginalization, but a kind of trauma that gets transferred across generations. This is a coming-out story suited to LGBTQ politics that do not automatically center the struggles of gay men. TITLE: Part 2 - The Generational Closet SCOTTY What gets passed down, what gets withheld, what gets reinterpreted—these are the central problems of the episode as it grapples with a group of people trying to gather and interpret a secret ancient knowledge in order to form a more just world. Showrunner Noelle Stevenson highlights how generational difference was written into the very structure of the show from the beginning, and into this episode in particular: TITLE: quote by Noelle Stevenson WOMAN’S VOICE (V.O.) “I definitely planned for Bow to have two dads. The question became how we were going to reveal that… You don’t just get to cut ties with somebody who was influential to you when you were younger. How you were raised stays with you forever whether you want it to or not. So, even though our characters are striving for selfindividuation and to be independent and to choose their own path — this is not just something they get to ignore or forget about. And so that is something that we wanted to explore in a very thoughtful way” --Dahl, “She-Ra's Noelle Stevenson on Bow’s Dads & Scorpia’s Love for Catra” Comic Book Resources. Clip: In the B-Story, Catra keeps a secret from Hordak SCOTTY (V.0.) We can see this drama in both the A-Story, involving Bow and his comrades, and the BStory, which focuses on Catra’s relationship with her leader, Hordak. Both stories are thematically preoccupied with secretkeeping, whether from the characters’ parents or from surrogate parental figures. In the B-Story, Catra has hidden the fact that one of her prisoners, a former Horde magic-user, has escaped and fled to the princesses. Hordak, however, catches her when she admits her mistake to her friend Scorpia, recording her voice on this weird, demon-baby thing. Clip: this baby SCOTTY I hate that baby… Clip: Hordak tortures Catra and shames her for keeping secrets from him, using fear to manipulate his subordinates SCOTTY (V.0.) Yeah so when the baby tells Hordak he reacts… poorly. The drama of secrecy and occlusion enters both narratives, and what we get is a stark contrast: a loving, accepting response that reckons with the pain of the past, and a cruel, punishing response that creates an environment of fear and internalized selfloathing that will continue to consume Catra’s character in later seasons. But in the context of the episode, this dual depiction of authority and secrecy across generational divides motivates the larger question of how queer people ought to be represented both as individual characters and as queer people. Responses to Lance and George have tended to praise the show for not depicting the characters as gay stereotypes. But while these characters may not be cookie-cutter stereotypes, certain of the design and dialogue choices very keenly incorporate iconography that marks their gayness generationally. Take George’s outfit and mustache for example. This is a powerful look—one that borrows from previous iterations of 80s-animated macho men, like Man-At-Arms, and the original Bow from the 80s She-Ra cartoon. George is certainly not a stereotype of these other men, but his mustache strikes me as a subtle nod to a gay aesthetic associated with the late 1970s and early-1980s. CUT TO: Images of the old She-Ra and He-Man characters Images: the old hunks from She-Ra (Bow, left) and He-Man (Manat-arms, right) were emblematic of a certain 1980s gay male aesthetic SCOTTY (V.O.) While the connection is loose, the retro quality of George’s aesthetic recalls political moment prior to the AIDS epidemic, one whose values he and Lance are betraying by refusing to listen to or respect their son’s hopes, desires, and values. Montage: the final confrontation has Bow ripping his shirt to assert his identity SCOTTY (V.O.) These aesthetics are also central to the episode’s climax, in which Bow rips his buttoned-up scholar’s clothes in order to reach for his arrows, exposing his midriff. At the disapproving parent figures in their son’s coming out story, George and Lance play a double role—they represent both an entrenched privilege that refuses to act politically, and a defeatism born out of a sense that they themselves have perhaps been betrayed by a political movement that never really made space for them—or, that is, one whose aspirations did not result in equal benefits for all. In a certain way, this is a contradictory position, but it’s one in which many queers continue to find themselves under the conditions of our present disasters. George and Lance’s plot signal a political position that plays witness to the failure of a queer political movement to secure social justice for many marginalized people, including themselves. It is also the position in which the protagonists find themselves, as they grapple with the uneven distribution of resources in Eternia after the failure of the first Princess alliance. While the episode raises the question of the value of militant and martial activism, it never ultimately gives up the idea that coming out is a kind of fight. The real question then becomes: what are we fighting for?
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Explanation & Answer

Please view explanation and answer below.Hi! this is the final job :DHave a nice day!

Moonlight analysis: OUTLINE
Thesis statement: This film depicts the three phases of Chiron's life as an Afro-American
fatherless child growing up in a rough and conflicted Miami neighborhood

1. Introduction
a. Context
b. Textual review
c. Background
d. Social issues
2. Childhood experiences
3. Race and sexual orientation
a. Particular situations
4. LGBTQ film
a. perspectives
5. Self-acceptance
a. Childhood problems
b. Family
c. Environment
6. Bullying
7. Colors
a. Emotions
b. Situations
c. Color palette
d. Sexual identity

8. Reflection
a. Conclusion
b. Main points


Moonlight analysis

bigotry against LGBT children was rampant in

Moonlight is a drama film from the United States

classrooms.

that was released in 2016. This film depicts the

Amber

three phases of Chiron's life as an Afro-American

Childhood experiences often affect your

fatherless child growing up in a rough and

whole life. In other words, it is also a guide to

conflicted Miami neighborhood. In addition, the

help you achieve self-realization. So treat all the

film depicts Chiron's struggles with people close

terrible stories that happened in your life as

to him and his mental growth, race, and

lessons

to

promote

yourself.

homosexuality in his culture.
In this textual review, I'll take elements
from the movie's historical period and link them
to the cultures they're talking about, the problems
they're facing, and their personalities, as well as
crucial movie elements like colors and music that
express essential factors in a scene.
First and foremost, it's important to note
that the film took place in 2016. If we consider
the United States, we are in the final years of
Barack Obama's presidency, which is a critical
era for the nation because the social, political, and
economic issues they face would be more
challenging to address. Racism is one of these
issues; for example, we have a horrific and wellknown tragedy in the south of the United States
of America, in which a white male murdered nine
black men. Unfortunately, racism has returned to
North America, according to the headlines.
However, other social issues arose at this
time, following the placement of many children
in social detention centers as a result of school
battles between children protecting themselves
from bullying based on their sexual orientations.
In addition, the country news titles revealed that

Clips: Little Chiron who’s young, black, queer

found an empty place to escape the bully. This
scene have been noticed by Juan— a drug dealer.
Amber
Race and sexual orientation are the
hottest

topics

discussed

in

the

media

contemporarily. Like always, we are appealing
for equal treatment of LGBTQ and all races.
However, incidents of hatred and bullying have
emerged endlessly. Sadly, just like the character
Chiron in the movie Moonlight, at an age when
he still couldn't recognize his orientation, he just
felt that he was different from others. He thinks
being bullied is a typical thing.
In this age, these situations lead us to a
question that we are unable to change society,
what can we do to achieve self-realization and
self-acceptance. Being LGBTQ, People may
need guidance to support them spiritually and to
fight against or ignore people who hate them.
There are still people at the confusing stage to
believe that it is their fault to become queer. They
are enduring tags that shouldn't be given to them.

Clip: A discussion about becoming what kind of
person in the future between little Chiron and
Juan.

Amber
The first time that I watched this movie
is four years ago. It is the first LGBTQ film and
the first film with an all-black cast to win the
Oscar for Best Picture. I ignored the vital scene
about the conversation between Juan and Chiron
on the beach. Several days ago, I rewatched the
movie. I realized that this conversation brings out
the theme. The man Juan tells Chiron a story that
an old white lady has described to him that black
boys are blue in the moonlight. Chiron asks Juan
that if his name is Blue. Juan said no. Juan tells
him that you should make decisions for yourself
about what you want to be at some point in your
life. Others cannot decide for you. At this point,
the movie uses metaphor to express that other
cannot name you by how you look like just like
all the decision you made are upon to yourself.
You don’t have to care about what others say. By
experiencing many things, you will decide for
yourself.
Amber:
From my perspective, I don’t like to say
that they are blue in the moonlight. More often
than ever, blue is the color to express a sad and
melancholy mood. Maybe at this time, the movie

Juan, who would like to become his mental guide.

also wants us to change the stereotype of queer.

Developing a healthy sense of sense and figuring

They have the right to live for themselves. They

out how LGBTQ fits into society is a fundamental

are not blue.

stage in childhood and adolescence. What
happened in these stages can continue into

TITLE: Part 1 — Self-acceptance —“who am I”

adulthood. They need supportive people around

At this stage of the movie, Chiron is still

them who understand and encourage them when

at the childhood stage. He is lucky that he meets

they are young.

Clip:

inside is more important. Only people who

Juan accidentally saw Chiron’s mom is doing

achieve self-acceptance are able to live for who

drugs in the car with another man. He is so angry

they are.

and arguing with his mom. At the same point, he
feels guilty since he is a drug dealer. Juan thinks
that if his mom doesn’t do drugs, C...


Anonymous
Really great stuff, couldn't ask for more.

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