Workplace example for these ethical theories

Philosophy
Tutor: None Selected Time limit: 1 Day

I need an example in the restaurant industry for Relativistic ethics and Human nature ethics.  

Jan 12th, 2015

Relativism is not a single doctrine but a family of views whose common theme is that some central aspect of experience, thought, evaluation, or even reality is somehow relative to something else. For example standards of justification, moral principles or truth are sometimes said to be relative to language, culture, or biological makeup. Although relativistic lines of thought often lead to very implausible conclusions, there is something seductive about them, and they have captivated a wide range of thinkers from a wide range of traditions.

Relativistic motifs turn up in virtually every area of philosophy. Many versions of descriptive relativism (described below) bear on issues in the philosophy of social science concerning the understanding and interpretation of alien cultures or distant historical epochs. Other versions bear on issues in the philosophy of mind about mental content. Still others bear on issues in the philosophy of science about conceptual change and incommensurability.

Relativistic themes have also spilled over into areas outside of philosophy; for example, they play a large role in today's "culture wars." Some strains of ethical relativism (also described below) even pose threats to our standards and practices of evaluation and, through this, to many of our social and legal institutions. And the suggestion that truth or justification are somehow relative would, if correct, have a dramatic impact on the most fundamental issues about objectivity, knowledge, and intellectual progress.

However, essentialism is not the only way of un­derstanding the concept of “human nature.” An alter­native view, now salient in all post-modern thought and very significant in the biological sciences, is non-teleological evolution, pioneered by Darwin. When applied to the study of human beings, an evolution­ary view makes no claim for the rational necessity of human nature, or for its immutability and timeless­ness; nor does it claim that an account of human na­ture will show that human nature is rationally related to the rest of the universe. There need also be no re­quirement that what makes humans human is some trait that the members of other species entirely lack. Typically, looking at traits allows one to recognize spe­cies, but the traits that allow us to recognize humans as humans might be found in some measure in other animals. And ultimately, in an evolutionary account, what really distinguishes species is not any claim about what traits characterize the members of the spe­cies, but the causal story that can be told about how the species appeared on the scene and how, through reproduction, it persist

Jan 12th, 2015

Did you know? You can earn $20 for every friend you invite to Studypool!
Click here to
Refer a Friend
...
Jan 12th, 2015
...
Jan 12th, 2015
May 22nd, 2017
check_circle
Mark as Final Answer
check_circle
Unmark as Final Answer
check_circle
Final Answer

Secure Information

Content will be erased after question is completed.

check_circle
Final Answer