Analyze the major developments between 1848 and 1861 that contributed to the Civil War, history homework help

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1) Analyze the major developments [hint: four] between 1848 and 1861 that contributed to the Civil War. Can one argue that one was the most significant? Explain.

2) Summarize the main points of Lincoln’s House Divided Speech. Why would someone from the South who followed the ideological discussions around the question of slavery have reason to be concerned about Lincoln’s opinions as stated in this address? Would this speech satisfy an ardent abolitionist? Why or why not? How do the ideas of this speech reflect the times in which it was given? What other main events in the march towards Civil War have influenced Lincoln’s thinking on slavery and the part it plays in the union at this point in the disintegration of the Union? From what he says in this speech what are Lincoln’s thought on the founders of the United States or rather those who wrote the Constitution at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia? Address at least two of these issues in your initial posting.

http://www.nationalcenter.org/HouseDivided.html

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The American People Eighth edition Chapter 12 The Union in Peril Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Modules • Introduction: The Union in Peril • 12.1: Slavery in the Territories • 12.2: Political Disintegration • 12.3: Kansas and the Two Cultures • 12.4: Polarization and the Road to War • 12.5: The Divided House Falls • 12.6: Conclusion: The “Irrepressible Conflict” Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Learning Objectives (1 of 2) • • • • 12.1: Recall the proposal from Congress in dealing with slavery in the territories 12.2: Relate the political party alignments of the 1850s to the civil war that followed 12.3: Examine how the southerners and northerners viewed themselves and each other especially after the events in Kansas 12.4: Distinguish between the cultural stereotypes and emotional attitudes of the southerners and the northerners that contributed to the outbreak of civil war Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Learning Objectives (2 of 2) • • 12.5: Evaluate the underlying causes leading to the American civil war 12.6: Recognize economic, cultural, political, constitutional, and emotional forces as contributors to the American Civil War Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Introduction: The Union in Peril • Crisis in America’s democratic political system • Causes for the Civil War • Issue of slavery and the political system • Four major developments between 1848 to 1861 that contributed to the Civil War • Preview of the Kansas Civil War Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.1: Slavery in the Territories (1 of 4) Objective: Recall the proposal from Congress in dealing with slavery in the territories • 12.1.1: Free Soil or Constitutional Protection? – – – – Compromise of 1850 Free-Soilers had mixed motives John C. Calhoun Economic, political, and moral considerations Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.1: Slavery in the Territories (2 of 4) Objective: Recall the proposal from Congress in dealing with slavery in the territories • 12.1.2: Popular Sovereignty and the Election of 1848 – – – – Americans sought compromise technique Whigs Warning from North Election Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.1: Slavery in the Territories (3 of 4) Objective: Recall the proposal from Congress in dealing with slavery in the territories • 12.1.3: The Compromise of 1850 – – – – – Issues faced by President Taylor Taylor was political novice Early 1850 Compromise of 1850 Fugitive Slave Act Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.1: Slavery in the Territories (4 of 4) Objective: Recall the proposal from Congress in dealing with slavery in the territories • 12.1.4: Consequences of Compromise – – – – – Compromise of 1850 added two ingredients to politics Other disappointments Other Northerners helped fugitives Women’s rights convention of 1851 Uncle Tom’s Cabin Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Map: The Compromise of 1850 Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.2: Political Disintegration (1 of 3) Objective: Relate the political party alignments of the 1850s to the civil war that followed • 12.2.1: Weakened Party Politics in the Early 1850s – Party scramble – Election of 1852 – Results • 12.2.2: The Kansas–Nebraska Act – Stephen Douglas’s Nebraska bill – Kansas–Nebraska Act Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.2: Political Disintegration (2 of 3) Objective: Relate the political party alignments of the 1850s to the civil war that followed • 12.2.3: Expansionist “Young America” in the Larger World – Introduction – Expansionist Americans Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Figure: Expansionist “Young America” in the 1850s: Attempted Raids into Latin America Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.2: Political Disintegration (3 of 3) Objective: Relate the political party alignments of the 1850s to the civil war that followed • 12.2.4: Nativism, Know-Nothings, and Republicans – Immigration – Know-Nothings Party – Republican party Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.3: Kansas and the Two Cultures (1 of 2) Objective: Examine how the southerners and northerners viewed themselves and each other especially after the events in Kansas • 12.3.1: Competing for Kansas – David Atchison – Population of Kansas – 1855 elections • 12.3.2: “Bleeding Kansas” – Blood and Civil War – Minor war Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.3: Kansas and the Two Cultures (2 of 2) Objective: Examine how the southerners and northerners viewed themselves and each other especially after the events in Kansas • 12.3.3: Northern Views and Visions – North – Republican government – Slavery in Northerners’ perspective • 12.3.4: The Southern Perspective – Southerners – Sovereignty Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.4: Polarization and the Road to War (1 of 3) Objective: Distinguish between the cultural stereotypes and emotional attitudes of the southerners and the northerners that contributed to the outbreak of civil war • 12.4.1: The Dred Scott Case – Dred Scott v. Sanford – Implications of decisions • 12.4.2: Constitutional Crisis in Kansas – Reasons for crisis – Senate reelection 1858 Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.4: Polarization and the Road to War (2 of 3) Objective: Distinguish between the cultural stereotypes and emotional attitudes of the southerners and the northerners that contributed to the outbreak of civil war • 12.4.3: Lincoln and the Illinois Debates – Abraham Lincoln – Douglas • 12.4.4: John Brown’s Raid – John Brown – Southerners’ fear Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.4: Polarization and the Road to War (3 of 3) Objective: Distinguish between the cultural stereotypes and emotional attitudes of the southerners and the northerners that contributed to the outbreak of civil war • 12.4.5: The Election of 1860 – Democrats – Republican strategy Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Map: The Presidential Election of 1860 Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.5: The Divided House Falls Objective: Evaluate the underlying causes leading to the American civil war • 12.5.1: Secession and Uncertainty – Overview – Three options – Frederick Douglass • 12.5.2: Lincoln and Fort Sumter – Lincoln and secession – Frederick Douglas’ viewpoint – Fall of America’s divided house Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12.6: Conclusion: The “Irrepressible Conflict” Objective: Recognize economic, cultural, political, constitutional, and emotional forces as contributors to the American Civil War – Half-slave and half-free nation – Extension of slavery into the territories and opposition between North and South – Red blood of civil war – Radically altered national scene – challenge to the democratic system Copyright © 2017, 2011, 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 12 The Union in Peril CHAPTER SUMMARY As Abraham Lincoln awaits the election returns in November 1860, three other Americans— Robert Allston, a South Carolina slave owner; Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave; and Michael Luark, an Iowa farmer—also watch the results of the election, each filled with intense concern over how the fate of the nation would affect his own. This chapter details the economic, social, and political developments after 1848 that culminated in the Civil War. As slavery became further concentrated and profitable in the South after the U.S.-Mexican conflict, a host of national political controversies erupted over the concept of the spread of slavery to new territories. Despite congressional political compromises, rancor between North and South over the spread of slavery would split the nation apart after Lincoln’s election in 1860. The heightened tensions surrounding the 1860 election and suggested by the anecdote indicate the central place the Civil War occupies in American history. The causes of the war that dissolved the Union, therefore, are crucial to an understanding of America’s history. The causes reflect the interrelationship of politics, emotions, and sectional culture. Historians have long debated, without resolution, the causes of the Civil War. This chapter focuses on four developments of the period between 1848 and 1861, each an important cause of the war. The chapter weaves these developments together in an interpretive narrative account of both the events and the cultural values behind the events. The student is left to decide how the four causes interacted to bring about the war and which, if any, were more important than others. Events in Kansas in 1855 and 1856 are highlighted as a specific microscopic illustration bringing together many of the forces that led Americans to secession and civil war in 1861. The primary focus in this chapter is on national political developments involving nationally known figures because the Civil War was, after all, fundamentally a political event. Nevertheless, the chapter includes the comments of ordinary Americans, most frequently those of two figures from earlier chapters, runaway slave Frederick Douglass and South Carolina rice planter Robert Allston, as they observed the events of the 1850s leading to the outbreak of civil war. 2 CHAPTER OUTLINE Slavery in the Territories Free Soil or Constitutional Protection? Popular Sovereignty and the Election of 1848 The Compromise of 1850 Consequences of Compromise Political Disintegration Weakened Party Politics in the Early 1850s The Kansas-Nebraska Act Expansionist “Young America” in the Larger World Nativism, Know-Nothings, and Republicans Kansas and the Two Cultures Competing for Kansas “Bleeding Kansas” Northern Views and Visions The Southern Perspective Polarization and the Road to War The Dred Scott Case Constitutional Crisis in Kansas Lincoln and the Illinois Debates John Brown’s Raid The Election of 1860 The Divided House Falls Secession and Uncertainty Lincoln and Fort Sumter Conclusion: The “Irrepressible Conflict” ...
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Doctor_Ralph
School: UIUC

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Running head : US CIVIL WAR

1

The US Civil War
Names:
Institution:

US CIVIL WAR

2
The US Civil War
Causes of Civil War

Many reasons compelled the Confederate, which comprised of the southern states, and
the Union, comprising of the northern states, to go to war. Notably, the two divisions had very
many differences that made war inevitable.
One such difference is the economic situation. The Northern had adopted
industrialization to a higher level and thus relied more on this for their economy. This led to a
high level of development in the region. On the other hand, the South relied heavily on
agriculture, and more so cotton, and their operations were majorly manual and thus requiring
hard labor facilitated by slaves (Osborne & Library of Congress, 2009). Additionally, the
political situation at the time did not facilitate close relationships between the two sides. In
this case, the South felt t...

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