EDUC 571 Liberty University Curriculum Planning Charts Project Worksheet

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EDUC 571

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EDUC 571 CURRICULUM PROJECT: SAMPLE CURRICULUM PLANNING CHARTS PROJECT – ELEMENTARY OR SPED ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS MAT in Elementary or SPED Consult the Horizontal Mapping Project you have already completed and create daily planning charts to correspond to 3 days of mapping. Submit a legend and 3 days of Curriculum Planning Charts. Each day of curriculum should fit on one page (your submission will be a total of six pages—title page, legend, three charts, and a reference page). Utilize grading feedback from this sample submission to complete the final Curriculum Project. No retroactive credit for the Sample Curriculum Planning Charts Project can be given from submission of the final Curriculum Project. For this project, you should consider yourself to be a curriculum planner that is providing an overview of what would be involved in a lesson. As the curriculum planner you are creating the block plan and the classroom teacher would then use your overview to create a very detailed daily lesson plan. Your curriculum planning charts (block plans) should have: ▪ ▪ ▪ The standard number and standard topic clearly identified (e.g. VA Math 3.1 Place Value) What the teacher and students will do for each lesson The legend symbols to show integration (see description below) Your curriculum planning charts (block plans) should exhibit: ▪ ▪ ▪ Effective use of allotted time for instruction as well as learning activities Creative, engaging, hands-on, and age-appropriate learning activities and assignments Thorough explanation of learning concepts, activities, and experiences Your curriculum planning charts (block plans) will include: A. Integration of content areas. Show how content areas relate to each other by using a legend. The legend is a “symbol list” of the many parts that should make up the curriculum. A legend helps you easily view where you are making holistic learning experiences for your students. For example: • • If you are teaching grids and how to plot points in math, you could teach map skills (using longitude and latitude) in Social Science.[M, SS,] The M stands for Math and the SS stands for Social Science and you are integrating the two together. If you are teaching poetry in English / Language Arts class, you could introduce your history lesson with a poem such as “O Captain, My Captain” by Walt Whitman (an homage to Abraham Lincoln after his assassination following the Civil War.) [LA, SS,] The LA stands for Language Arts and the SS stands for Social Science and you are integrating the two together. Page 1 of 2 EDUC 571 • • If you are teaching the water cycle in Science and a “Rain Dance” from the Native American culture in SS, you are integrating 3 subjects. [S, SS, D] The S stands for Science, and the SS stands for Social Science, and the D stands for Dance. If you are teaching how to read and create Historical timelines in Social Science class, you could have your students create a timeline using Power Point. [SS, T] The SS stands for Social Science, and the T stands for Technology. B. Integration of content and curriculum components. Make sure to integrate the following content and components: • Daily integrate reading and writing instruction for English Language Arts (ELA). Use classic and award-winning literature. Note what skill you are teaching by using the literature. • Daily integrate Fine Arts (Visual Art, Music, Theatre, or Dance); Health (e.g. You could teach about cell growth in math class, etc.); and PE (eg. You could teach a dance popular in the Civil War era.) • Highlight in yellow (as seen in the example) how you are frequently providing diverse instruction and accommodations for exceptional learners. • Promote critical thinking and use problem solving activities. • Provide active learning experiences. Plan multiple hands-on learning experiences and projects. Paper and pencil worksheets should be used very sparingly. • Leverage technology. Teachers and students should use various apps to design and complete projects and reinforce learning. • Use a variety of informal and formal assessments (paper /pencil, projects, reports, portfolios, etc.) • Collaborate with colleagues, families, and communities (consider team-teaching and using other faculty members to help form smaller groups in the classroom, using families to help with classroom experiences or field trips, using community guest speakers and area resources and field trip opportunities). • Use diverse resources (books, apps, websites, and journal articles). If you use an app or website, paste the web address within the block plan. However, you will formally cite the resource as a reference in current APA format at the end of the project in the reference section. Page 2 of 2 EDUC 571 CURRICULUM PROJECT: SAMPLE CURRICULUM PLANNING CHARTS PROJECT GRADING RUBRIC Content Standards Identified CAEP 1.1; 1.3 InTASC 4 MCEE 2 CEC 3 Character Education CEC 2 Developmental Learning CAEP 1.1 InTASC 1,3 CEC 1 Diversity & Accommodation CAEP 1.1; InTASC 2, 7 MCEE 3 CEC 1, 5 Critical Thinking CAEP 1.4 CEC 5 Advanced 9 to 10 points State standards are the basis for planning and implementing differentiated instruction. Standards are current and have traceable identifiers. 9 to 10 points Character traits are identified in learning experiences that are morally purposeful, engaging, and integrated throughout the curriculum. 9 to 10 points Learning activities are achievable, meaningful, challenging, and motivating for students at various developmental levels. Proficient 7 to 8 points State standards are the basis for planning and implementing differentiated instruction. Standards are current. Most standards have traceable identifiers. 7 to 8 points Character traits are identified in learning experiences that are morally purposeful but not engaging or integrated into the curriculum. 7 to 8 points Learning activities are achievable. Additional motivating and challenging activities are needed to meet the developmental needs of students. 9 to 10 points Curriculum plan provides many opportunities for differentiated instruction and ensures accommodations are met to address diversity among students. 9 to 10 points Teaching strategies encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. 7 to 8 points Curriculum plan provides some opportunities for differentiated instruction. More differentiation and accommodation are needed to address diversity among students. 7 to 8 points Some teaching strategies encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. Developing 1 to 6 points Minimal and vague identification of standards. State standards need to be used as the basis for planning/implementing differentiated instruction. Not present 0 points Not present 1 to 6 points Character traits are unclear. Minimal and vague description of learning experiences. 0 points Not present 1 to 6 points 0 points Minimal and vague description of Not present learning activities. Planning describes few activities that are motivating and/or challenging for students at various developmental levels. 1 to 6 points 0 points Minimal and vague description of Not present differentiated instruction and accommodation. Planning does not ensure accommodations are met to address diversity among students. 1 to 6 points Minimal and vague description of teaching strategies. Few strategies encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. 0 points Not present Page 1 of 2 EDUC 571 Active Learning 9 to 10 points CAEP 1.1 Learning experiences and InTASC 7, 8 assignments are creative, CEC 2 engaging, hands-on, and age appropriate. 7 to 8 points Some learning experiences and assignments are creative, engaging, hands-on, and/or age appropriate. Technology Experiences CAEP 1.1; 1.5 InTASC 8 ISTE 3, 6 MCEE 5 CEC 5 7 to 8 points Curriculum plan provides some technology experiences for students to improve their technology use skills, produce content, practice academic content or skills, and distinguish between credible and noncredible sites. Proficient 3 points Some spelling and grammar errors are present. Some mistakes in current APA format for the title page, headings, page orientation, and/or pagination. References have some mistakes in current APA formatting. 23 to 24 points EL/SPED: 3 days of curriculum charts were submitted but not according to the posted template and/or with a complete legend. Secondary: 2 weeks of curriculum charts were submitted but not according to the posted template and/or with a complete legend. Structure Spelling and Grammar; Current APA Formatting and Citation Standards Charts 9 to 10 points Curriculum plan provides many experiences for students to improve their technology use skills, produce content, practice academic content or skills, and distinguish between credible and noncredible sites. Advanced 4 points Spelling and grammar are correct. Title page, headings, page orientation, and pagination are current APA format. References are cited in current APA format. 25 to 26 points EL/SPED: a legend and 3 days of curriculum charts were submitted according to the posted template. Secondary: a legend and 2 weeks of curriculum charts were submitted according to the posted template. 1 to 6 points Minimal and vague description of active learning experiences. Few experiences and assignments are creative, engaging, hands-on, and/or age appropriate. 1 to 6 points Minimal and vague description of technology experiences. Planning provides few experiences for students to improve their technology use skills, produce content, practice academic content or skills, and distinguish between credible and non-credible sites. Developing 1 to 2 points Spelling and grammar errors distract. Several errors in current APA format for the title page, headings, page orientation, and/or pagination. References are not cited. 0 points Not present 1 to 22 points EL/SPED: less than 3 days of curriculum charts were submitted. Check template and legend for completeness. Secondary: less than 2 weeks of curriculum charts were submitted. Check template and legend for completeness. 0 points Not present 0 points Not present Not present 0 points Not present Page 2 of 2 SAMPLE PLANNING CHARTS 1 Ohio ELA Standards Sample Curriculum Planning Charts: Seventh Grade John Doe Liberty University SAMPLE PLANNING CHARTS 2 Legend A: Art BS: Brainstorming CE: Character Education CON: Conferencing D: Discussion DA: Differentiation/Accommodation E: Evaluation ED: Editing ELA: English Language Arts EX: Teacher Modeling/Example GA: Group Activity GO: Graphic Organizer HS: home/school connection— collaboration with families HW: Homework IA: Independent Activity ET: Exit Ticket L: Literacy LE: M: Math MU: Music MO: Movement/Physical Education NT: Note taking OA: Opening Activity PER: Peer Review PED: Peer Editing PS: Public Speaking PW: Partner Work R: Reading RS: Research SS: Social Studies SA: Stations Activity T: Technology TH: Theatre VC: Video Clip W: Writing WS: Worksheet SAMPLE PLANNING CHARTS 3 WEEK 3 M- DAY 11 T-DAY 12 Character Trait: Individuality W-DAY 13 TH-DAY 14 F-DAY 15 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.6: Point of view CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1: Textual evidence and inference CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4: Figurative language and word meanings CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4: Figurative language and word meanings CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.6: Point of view OA/ELA/PW: Students will turn to their shoulder partners and discuss what the following statements mean: “A picture is worth a thousand words” and “One word is worth a thousand pictures.” OA/ELA/W: The students will look at the two sentences, “The cocky student answered the question with ease” and “The confident student answered the question with ease.” They will write in their journals what each sentence means and the emotional/contextual meaning behind it. OA/ELA/W: Students will be given three minutes to write in their journals the types of point of view they know and pronouns that are used for each. D/EX/GO: The teacher will ask students to share the information they discussed concerning the statements above. The teacher will then present information on connotations and denotations. As the teacher presents information on the three different aspects of connotations, the students will fill out their graphic organizers. The teacher will model how to do so. A/BS/GA/PS/W: Students will be placed in groups and will be given a sport/activity in which they will brainstorm words and ideas and create a team name that coincides with the activity they are given in which the connotation of that name fits with the sport/activity. (Example: Ben Logan Brainiacs for the school quiz bowl team.) The students will create a team name, draw a picture of their mascot/emblem, and write an explanation as to why they chose this name and the connotation behind it. Each group will present their team names to the class. Revised from www.scholastic.com ET: Students will state the three types of connotations and provide an example of each. DA: Gifted students, IEP students, and onlevel students will be intermingled within groups so gifted students can help IEP students. D: The teacher will review information and discuss how writers use connotation in fiction to show characters’ moods/feelings. PW/R/SS: With a partner, students will read Part 10 of All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. D: The teacher will regroup the students and ask for them to detail the events of part 10. The teacher will discuss connotations and language used throughout the part and the emotional/contextual meaning behind the author’s word choices. WS/HW: Students will be given a specific paragraph from part 10 and they will complete a worksheet in which they are to identify effective words used by the author and the connotations behind the language. The students will discuss how the language makes them feel and think as the reader. Any portion the student does not get done in class will be performed as homework. DA: Gifted students partner read with onlevel students. The teacher will read with the IEP students and stop frequently to determine their understanding of the text. DA: Visually-impaired students will listen to the audio version. M/VC: Students will watch the video and listen to the rap “Point of View” by Flocabulary. Retrieved from www.flocabulary.com D/EX/GO: The teacher will create an anchor chart with the students’ help concerning the point of views used in writing. The students will follow along by filling out a graphic organizer about point of view. PW/SA/WS: The students will be paired up and placed at different stations. Each station will contain a one-paragraph writing in which the students have to determine what point of view it is written in and the pronouns/context clues they used to determine point of view. The students will fill out a portion of the worksheet at each station. ET/T: Students will take a 10-question Kahoot quiz concerning point of view. Retrieved from www.kahoot.com DA: Gifted students will be partnered with IEP students and on-level students will be partnered with struggling readers/learners who are not identified. DA: Visually-impaired students will have the quiz read to them. OA/ELA/GA: Students will discuss and identify the point of view used in All the Light We Cannot See. D: The teacher will provide students with a summary of the parts they have read to date. PW/R/SS: With a partner, students will read Part 11 of All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. D: The teacher will regroup the students and ask for them to detail the events of part 11. The teacher will discuss with the students the points of view the author uses for the characters and how it affects the characters and the book. IA/W/WS: Individually, students will complete a worksheet in which they identify the point of view of a character, provide examples of word choice/context clues that demonstrate the point of view, and analyze why the author chose to use the specific point of view and if it is beneficial/harmful. E/ET/PW: Students will share their completed worksheet with a classmate who will evaluate it and provide feedback. The students will turn in the worksheet so the teacher can identify if the students comprehend the material. DA: Gifted students partner read with onlevel students. The teacher will read with the IEP students and stop frequently to determine their understanding of the text. DA: Visually-impaired students will listen to the audio version. OA/ELA//T: Students will enter Google classroom and fill out a form concerning what they know and understand about explicit text vs. inferences made from text. D/NT/T: The teacher will present a PowerPoint presentation on explicit vs. inference text and the students will take notes. D/EX/GO/IA/R: As a class, the teacher and students will read the short story “13 and a Half” by Rachel Vail. The teacher will stop intermittently to gauge understanding. Then, the students and teacher together will begin to complete a graphic organizer concerning both explicit information and inferences that can be made from the text. The teacher will model how to complete the graphic organizer. The students will then complete the graphic organizer individually. Retrieved from www.scope.scholastic.com GO/PW/PER/ET: Students will pair up and discuss the inferences they drew from the reading and their reasoning behind them. The students will pair up five times with different students to discuss different inferences they made. They will add to their graphic organizers as needed. DA: IEP students will read a fictional story that is closely aligned with their reading and comprehension skills and work with an aide/intervention specialist. SAMPLE PLANNING CHARTS 4 WEEK 4 T-DAY 17 Character Trait: Honesty W-DAY 18 TH-DAY 19 F-DAY 20 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1: Textual evidence and inference CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2: Central idea and summary writing CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2: Central idea and summary writing CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2: Central idea and summary writing CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2: Central idea and summary writing OA/ELA/T/VC: The teacher will show the short video “What Is Inference: How to Infer Intended Meaning” by Katie Surber. Retrieved from www.study.com OA/ELA: The teacher will make statements concerning the book thus far and the students will each hold up a sign that reads true or false, depending on whether they agree or disagree with the teacher’s statement. OA/ELA/D: The teacher will present a few creative summaries from former students. The teacher will discuss student expectations for the summaries. OA/ELA/D: The teacher will present a few creative summaries from former students. M- DAY 16 D: The teacher will provide students with a summary of the parts they have read to date. PW/R/SS: With a partner, students will read Part 12 of All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. D: The teacher will regroup the students and ask for them to detail the events of part 12. GA/PS/T: The teacher will place the students in groups of three and give each group a specific section of part 12. The students will analyze the text using explicit information and inferences. The students will create a three-slide presentation using their information. The groups will present their PowerPoint slides to the class coinciding with the book’s order of information. ET: Students will turn in their presentations to demonstrate understanding. DA: Gifted students partner read with onlevel students. The teacher will read with the IEP students and stop frequently to determine their understanding of the text. DA: Visually-impaired students will listen to the audio version. DA: Gifted students, IEP students, and onlevel...
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Running head: PLANNING CHART

1

Name
Tutor
Institution
Course
Date

PLANNING CHART

2
Legend

A Art
CC Collaboration with colleagues
CE Character education
CM Communication
CT Critical thinking
DA Diversity/accommodation
E English
EC Economics
EVAL Evaluation (assessment)
GA Group activity
L Literacy
LI Listening
LS Life skills
HI History
HS Home/school connection (collaboration)
HW Homework
M Math
MA Manipulative activity
OL Oral language/presentations (public speaking)
PE Physical education/movement
PS Problem solving
R Reading
S Science
T Technology
W Writing

PLANNING CHART

3
Week 1, Day 3
Character Trait: Commitment

VA SOL Writing 3.8, 3.9;
Reading 3.4 f, g

VA SOL MATH 3.2
Fractions, mixed numbers

Cursive handwriting; writing
with intention; vocabulary
expansion
ENG/HI: The class will create a
list of undiscovered Ancient
Greek subject terminology and
topics. (REFER TO HISTORY)
ENG/T/R/GA/W/CM:
Nonfiction writing is used to
offer readers knowledge on a
topic, as explained by the
teacher. Students will be divided
into groups, with each group
receiving an equal amount of
subject words/topics from the
teacher. Students will use their
iPads and the classroom library
to research material and develop
definitions/short answers in their
own words that include the most
significant facts about the
word/topic (not a word-for-word
definition, but a created
definition or short answer). The
class will collaborate to come up
with a working brief answer for
each term. The pupils will next
evenly distribute the words
among themselves. Each student
will write the definition/short
response that the group came up
with in their best cursive
handwriting, spelling correctly.
EVAL: For topic
comprehension and perfect
spelling, the teacher will collect
and review definitions.

M/CT: Improper fractions will be
introduced by the teacher. On the
board, she will write several
proper and improper fractions.
She'll ask the children if they can
tell what makes each of these
fractions unique (desired answer
examples: the top is bigger than
the bottom, the numerator is
bigger, the denominator is
smaller, the numbers are the same
on top, and bottom). When all
students understand what
distinguishes improper fractions
from proper fractions, the teacher
will use the smartboard to
demonstrate how to convert
improper fractions to mixed
numbers using models.
MA/M/GA: Students will be
divided into groups of two. They
will physically generate incorrect
fractions with fraction
manipulatives before converting
them to mixed numbers. Students
should commit to managing their
time effectively. On the magnetic
board, the students will present
one of their improper
fraction/mixed number equations
to the class.
EVAL: The teacher will take note
of the students' comprehension of
fractions.

VA SOL SCIENCE 3.4
Animal adaptations:
Physical
S: By dissecting the underlying word,
adapt, the teacher will explain what the
word adaptation means. She will tell the
pupils that animals adapt for a variety of
reasons, including avoiding predators,
finding food, and staying warm.
S/T: The class will watch a video about
black bear adaptations.
S/A: Students will design one type of
black bear adaptation using the maker's
space bin. Unique, wearable, and
realistic inventions are required
(meaning they must represent actual
black bear adaptations).
OL: Students will present their
creations to the class by wearing them
and standing up from their seats. They'll
explain how their modification will
benefit the black bear (e.g., find food,
avoid predators, keep warm).
EVAL: As students present their
adaptations, the teacher will add to and
assist them in clearly articulating the
role that each adaptation plays.

PLANNING CHART

4

Week 1, day 4
Character Trait: Commitment
VA SOL Writing 3.8, 3.9;
Reading 3.4 f, g
Cursive handwriting; write
with purpose; expand
vocabulary
E/W: The unit on nonfiction
writing and content
vocabulary continue. The
teacher will remind the pupils
that nonfiction writing is
intended to educate readers
about a particular subject. She
will advise the kids that when
writing nonfiction, they must
avoid including personal
comments or thoughts. When
writing nonfiction, students
should commit to writing
simply the facts.
E/W/GA/HI: Students will
write two paragraphs in their
historical groups discussing
the Ancient Greek architecture
aspects of the modern
structure they have been
allocated. The nonfiction
writing should include
information about the
building's location, designer,
function, construction date,
and obvious safety features.
Everyone should be able to
add to the paragraphs by
writing in their finest cursive.
DA: Students who have
trouble writing can dictate
their contributions to the
group's paragraphs to another
group member who can
function as a scribe.

VA SOL MATH 3.2
Fractions, mixed...


Anonymous
Excellent resource! Really helped me get the gist of things.

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