Biomedical Examples, health and medical assignment help

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timer Asked: Apr 23rd, 2017
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Question Description

Mickey Mantle received a liver transplant in 1995. He was a Baseball Hall of Fame center fielder for the New York Yankees whose liver was failing because of cirrhosis and hepatitis. Although the waiting period for a liver transplant in the United States is about 130 days, it took only two days for the Baylor Medical Center's transplant team to find an organ donor for the 63-year-old former baseball hero.

According to the director of the Southwest Organ Bank, Mantle was moved ahead of others on the list because of his deteriorating medical condition; however, there were mixed feelings about speeding up the process for a celebrity. Mantle was known for overcoming immense obstacles, and many argued that the medical system should provide exceptions for heroes. He was also a recovering alcoholic, which further complicated the ethical implications of the case. Because of Mantle's medical problems, doctors estimated that he had only a 60 percent chance for a three-year survival; whereas, liver transplant patients typically have about a 78 percent chance for a three-year survival rate.

As in the case of the liver transplant for Mickey Mantle, should the system make exceptions for anyone? Why or why not?

Write a 1,200 word paper in which you analyze the Mickey Mantle case using the Seven-Step Decision Model (See attached)

Format your assignment according to APA guidelines. (Minimum 3 reference)

NO PLAGIARISM AND GRAMMAR ERRORS - I WILL CHECK THEM PRIOR TO 'REVIEW TUTOR'.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Making ethical choices requires the ability to make distinctions between competing options. Here are seven steps to help you make better decisions: 1. Stop and think: This provides several benefits. It prevents rash decisions, prepares us for more thoughtful discernment, and can allow us to mobilize our discipline. 2. Clarify goals: Before you choose, clarify your short-term and long-term aims. Determine which of your many wants and "don't wants" affected by the decision are the most important. The big danger is that decisions that fullfill immediate wants and needs can prevent the achievement of our more important life goals. 3. Determine facts: Be sure you have adequate information to support an intelligent choice. To determine the facts, first resolve what you know, then what you need to know. Be prepared for additional information and to verify assumptions and other uncertain information. In addition: o Consider the reliability and credibility of the people providing the facts. o Consider the basis of the supposed facts. If the person giving you the information says he or she personally heard or saw something, evaluate that person in terms of honesty, accuracy, and memory. 4. Develop options: Once you know what you want to achieve and have made your best judgment as to the relevant facts, make a list of actions you can take to accomplish your goals. If it's an especially important decision, talk to someone you trust so you can broaden your perspective and think of new choices. If you can think of only one or two choices, you're probably not thinking hard enough. 5. Consider consequences: Filter your choices to determine if any of your options will violate any core ethical values, and then eliminate any unethical options. Identify who will be affected by the decision and how the decision is likely to affect them. 6. Choose: Make a decision. If the choice is not immediately clear, try: o Talking to people whose judgment you respect. o Think of a person of strong character that you know or know of, and ask your self what they would do in your situation. o If everyone found out about your decision, would you be proud and comfortable? o Follow the Golden Rule: treat others the way you want to be treated, and keep your promises. 7. Monitor and modify: Ethical decision-makers monitor the effects of their choices. If they are not producing the intended results, or are causing additional unintended and undesirable results, they re-assess the situation and make new decisions. ...

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