Nature and Process of Science, Physics Lab help

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timer Asked: May 12th, 2017
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Question Description

I need this Physics lab completed, please follow all the direction and make sure the lab meets all the requirements in the rubric. I have attached the rubric and Instructions for Selecting a Topic.

Below are all the sections that need to be defined in the lab.

Work must be original.


INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LAB

Competencies:
1000.1.1: Nature and Process of Science - The graduate critically analyzes the nature and process of science.
1000.1.2: Classical Physics - The graduate analyzes classical physics concepts to understand the world around them.
1000.1.3: Wave Physics - The graduate applies wave physics concepts to understand the world around them.
1000.1.4: Electricity and Magnetism - The graduate applies concepts of electricity and magnetism to understand the world around them.
1000.1.5: Thermodynamics - The graduate analyzes principles of thermodynamics.
1000.1.6: Modern Physics - The graduate analyzes concepts of modern physics.



Task 2: Physics Experiment

Introduction:

For this task, you will design, conduct, and report on a science experiment in physics. The purpose of this task is for you to demonstrate your understanding of a physics topic using the scientific method, from research and design to reporting of results. Your experiment should demonstrate a basic physics principle and does not need to lead to a new scientific discovery.

Be sure to incorporate appropriate safety precautions when designing and executing your experiment. Experiments conducted on vertebrate organisms (including humans) are strictly prohibited by policy.

Requirements:

Your submission must be your original work. No more than a combined total of 30% of the submission and no more than a 10% match to any one individual source can be directly quoted or closely paraphrased from sources, even if cited correctly. Use the Turnitin Originality Report available in Taskstream as a guide for this measure of originality.

You must use the rubric to direct the creation of your submission because it provides detailed criteria that will be used to evaluate your work. Each requirement below may be evaluated by more than one rubric aspect. The rubric aspect titles may contain hyperlinks to relevant portions of the course.

Note: The section headings bolded and italicized below divide the requirements into sections of a lab report. You may choose to include these section headings in your submission.

Section 1: Introduction

A. Explain how two existing reference materials relate to a basic physics principle and lay the groundwork for your physics experiment.

Note: See the attached “Task 2 Instructions for Selecting a Topic” for guidelines on choosing an appropriate topic for this task.

B. Describe the following variables for your experiment:

1. the independent variable and how it will be manipulated

2. the dependent variable and how it will be quantified and recorded, including units of measure

3. three external variables and how they will be controlled

C. Write a specific and testable hypothesis for your experiment that relates to your chosen physics principle from part A.

Section 2: Materials and Methods

D. List the materials and equipment needed to conduct your experiment, including all necessary measurement equipment and their specifications (e.g., "a one-cup glass measuring cup" or "a Celsius thermometer").

E. Explain the steps of the process used to conduct your experiment. This explanation should be specific enough that someone else could replicate your experiment and should include how your quantitative (i.e., measurable) data were collected.

Section 3: Results

F. Describe the results of your experiment using all gathered data.

G. Create a visual representation (i.e., data table, graph, chart) for the data you gathered from each experimental manipulation. Be sure that you choose a method of visual representation that effectively communicates the main findings of your experiment (e.g., exact measurements, trends over time, differences across categories, proportions). Make sure your visual representation clearly represents data for each quantified variable, and be sure to label and align your data accurately. Remember also to choose a scale that fits the range of the data and represent your data points precisely and accurately.

Section 4: Conclusion

H. Conclude whether your hypothesis was confirmed, refuted, or partially confirmed and discuss how the observed results support these findings.

I. Explain how the results of your experiment connect to the basic physics principle you chose.

J. Acknowledge sources, using in-text citations and references, for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Select the topic or question you would like to address with your experiment. Before you select a topic, consider the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. Look at the list of possible topics below for ideas. Choose an aspect of physics that you would like to investigate. Determine a question that you would like to answer. Identify your experimental and response variables (you should have only one of each). An appropriate question for this investigation should explore a causal link between one experimental variable and one response variable. 5. Make observations and conduct a literature review to find out more about what is already known about that link. 6. Formulate your hypothesis. How do you think your experimental variable will affect your response variable? Your hypothesis should be testable and specific, and it should allow for the collection of quantifiable data. Your response variable should be a measurable outcome that yields quantitative, numeric data. 7. Fine-tune your experimental protocol by considering your controlled variables. Your project needs to address a topic in physics. Below are some possible topics to consider: Area of Physics General topic ideas Classical Physics Electricity and Magnetism Wave Physics Rolling or bouncing, friction, paper airplanes, catapults, automobile driving, simple machines Battery testing, conductivity, electromagnetic induction, simple circuits, motors, generators Refraction, reflection, interference, antenna designs Thermodynamics Freezing, boiling, heating/cooling, specific heat capacity ZBT Task 2 (0616) Not Evident Responses are unstructured or disjointed. Vocabulary and tone are unprofessional or distract from the topic. Responses contain pervasive errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar. Approaching Competence Responses are poorly organized or difficult to follow. Terminology is misused or ineffective. Responses contain errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar that cause confusion. A. https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=31 9 The explanation of the existing reference materials is not present, inaccurately describes the existing reference materials, or is irrelevant to the basic physics principle. B1. https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=43 4 B2. https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx The independent variable is not identified or is unrelated to the chosen physics experiment. The explanation accurately describes how 2 existing reference materials are relevant to the basic physics principle, but does not logically lay the groundwork for the experiment. Only 1 existing reference material included is relevant to the basic physics principle and logically lays the groundwork for the experiment. The description identifies the independent variable used in the physics experiment but does not include how it will be manipulated. https://lrps.wgu.edu/provision/ 27641407 The dependent variable is not identified or is unrelated to the chosen physics experiment. Competent Responses are organized and focus on the main ideas presented in the assessment. Word choice is pertinent and clearly conveys the intended meaning to the audience. Responses reflect attention to detail. Mechanics, usage, and grammar promote understanding and readability. The explanation accurately describes how 2 existing reference materials are relevant to the basic physics principle and logically lay the groundwork for the experiment. The description identifies the independent variable used in the physics experiment and includes how it will be manipulated. The description identifies a The description identifies a dependent variable used in the quantifiable dependent physics experiment, but it is variable used in the physics ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=43 4 B3. https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=43 4 The description of 3 external variables is not provided, or the variables given are unrelated to the chosen physics experiment. A description of how the variables will be controlled is not provided. C. The hypothesis is not https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co provided, does not relate to m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx the chosen physics topic, or is ?id=90873277-541a-4c02inappropriate for the b5ecexperiment. 1d4194e9d650&start=53 3 D. The list of materials and https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co equipment needed to conduct m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx the chosen physics experiment ?id=90873277-541a-4c02is not provided. b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=58 4 E. The steps for the experimental https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co process are not provided. An m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx explanation of how the data ?id=90873277-541a-4c02were collected is not present. b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=66 3 F. The description of the results https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co of the chosen physics m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx experiment is not provided. not quantifiable. The description does not include the variable’s units of measure. The description identifies 3 external variables for the chosen physics experiment, but the description of how the variables will be controlled to mitigate any confounding effect on the observed results is not provided or is incorrect. The hypothesis provided relates to the chosen physics topic, but it is not specific or testable. experiment and includes the variable’s units of measure. The explanation contains the steps for the experimental process, but the steps are not specific or replicable. The explanation contains specific and replicable steps for the experimental process and includes how the data were collected. The description is logical but does not highlight the key findings and trends from the The description logically highlights the key findings and trends from the chosen The description identifies 3 external variables and accurately describes how they will be controlled to mitigate any confounding effect on the observed results. The hypothesis provided is specific and testable and appropriately predicts the effect of the manipulation on an independent variable on a quantitative dependent variable. The list of materials and The provided list of materials equipment needed to conduct and equipment needed to the chosen physics experiment conduct the chosen physics is provided, but the list experiment accurately inaccurately specifies the type, specifies the type, size, and size, or quantity of materials. quantity of materials. ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=70 9 G. A visual representation of an https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co experimental manipulation is m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx not provided. ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=73 3 chosen physics experiment. A data table, graph, or chart is provided for at least one, but not each experimental manipulation. The method of data visualization does not effectively communicate the main findings of the experiment, it does not clearly represent the data, or it does not include each quantified variable. If the chosen data visualization is a table, either the values within the tables are not clearly labeled, or the data are misaligned or illegible. If the chosen visualization is a graph or chart, the axes or categories are not clearly labeled, or the data points are not precisely placed or are inaccurate, or the scale does not fit the range of the data. H. The conclusion for the results The conclusion logically https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co of the chosen physics compares the results of the m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx experiment to the initial chosen physics experiment to ?id=90873277-541a-4c02hypothesis is not provided or is the initial hypothesis, but does b5ecillogical. not discuss how the results 1d4194e9d650&start=83 support these findings. 9 I. The explanation is not The explanation illogically https://wgu.hosted.panopto.co provided for the basic physics connects the results of the m/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx principle chosen. experiment to the basic physics experiment. A data table, graph, or chart is provided for each experimental manipulation. The method of data visualization effectively communicates the main findings of the experiment. If the chosen visualization is a table, values within tables are clearly labeled and data are aligned and legible. If the chosen visualization is a graph or a chart, the axes or categories within graphs/charts are clearly labeled, the data points are precise and accurate, and the scale fits the range of the data. The conclusion logically compares the results of the chosen physics experiment to the initial hypothesis and discusses how the results support these findings. The explanation logically connects the results of the experiment to the basic ?id=90873277-541a-4c02b5ec1d4194e9d650&start=85 9 J. https://lrps.wgu.edu/provision/ 71484321 The submission does not include both in-text citations and a reference list for sources that are quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. physics principle chosen. physics principle chosen. The submission includes intext citations for sources that are quoted, paraphrased, or summarized, and a reference list; however, the citations and/or reference list is incomplete or inaccurate. The submission includes intext citations for sources that are properly quoted, paraphrased, or summarized and a reference list that accurately identifies the author, date, title, and source location as available. ...
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Tutor Answer

eetorres
School: University of Virginia

Attached.

Basic Circuit Laws
Introduction
In the basic electrical circuits, there are 3 interrelated magnitudes: Voltage, Current and
Resistance. This relationship can be described by Ohm's Law; “Ohm’s law states that the
voltage across conducting materials is directly proportional to the current flowing through
the material” (Hayt, Kemmerly, & Durbin, 2012)
In the present work, we will perform a practice of assembly of electrical circuits to measure
experimentally the relationship between voltage and electric current.
The independent variable of the experiment will be the voltage measured in volts (V) and
will be provided by a direct current voltage source. The unknown or independent variable
will be current, which will travel a resistor, and that we measure in milliamperes (mA) and
quantify as part of the experiment.
There are certain external variables that we will not take into account and we will minimize
their effects, given that their small magnitude are not relevant, for example: temperature is
known to affect the conductivity of materials, but in our case it will not represent a major
concern(will be working in a space with constant temperature at 25 ° C), also the resistivity
of conductors used the circuit (a Protoboard whose conductive sheet has very low
resistivity will be used, so that it can be ignored for analysis purposes) and the error
between the nominal values and actual values of the elements (this error is always present
and is part of any experiment of electricity, must be less than 10%).
In this sense it will be appropriate to resort to Kirchhoff's Laws, the first of which is: the
Kirchhoff's Voltage Law (LVK) reads as follows: “The algebraic sum of all voltages in a
loop must equal zero" (Kuphaldt, 2006) And on the other hand the Law of Current of
Kirchhoff states: "The algebraic sum of all currents entering and exiting a node must equal
zero" (Kuphaldt, 2006)
Our hypothesis is: In a basic electric circuit, the proportionality ratio between the voltage
and the electric current is equal to a constant (to the resistance) and both the energy and the
charge are conserved.

Materials








DC Voltage Power Supply (1)
100-ohm resistor (1)
200-ohm resistor (1)
47-ohm resistor (1)
Digital Multitester (1)
Small Pliers (1)
Protoboard (1)

Methods for Ohm’ Law
1.

Mount the next circuit in the protoboard, where V1 is the DC Power source, and R1
will represent the resistor to be used, we will also use the ammeter connected in
series with the positive terminal of the source and the resistor, as shown in figure:

2. Turn on the multitester and set the selector to direct current (mA)
3. Turn the power on and set it to deliver the desired voltage at each measurement, the
100-ohm resistor will be used.
4. We fill in the following table with the data read from the Ammeter every time we
change the value of the voltage.

Voltage (V)
2
4
7
9

Table I
Current (mA)
18.5
39
68
88.5

5. Repeat the steps from 1 to 4, but for a 47-ohms resistor

Voltage (V)
2
4
7
9

Table II
Current (mA)
41.5
85
148.1
190.2

6. Repeat the steps from 1 to 4, but for a 200-ohms resistor

Voltage (V)
2
4
7
9

Table III
Current (mA)
9.9
20
34.7
44.4

7. We build the following circuit:

where V1=9 Volts; R1=100 ohms; R2=200 ohms.

8.

We made 3 measurements with the ammeter (it is not necessary to realize them
simultaneously)

Measure
M1
M2
M3

Table IV
Current (mA)
134.8
89.5
45.3

9. We build the following circuit:

Where V1= 9 Volts; R1=100 ohms; R2=200 ohms
10. Place the Multitester in the Voltmeter function, for DC voltage measurement, and carry
out the measurements indicated in the figure.

Measure
Supply
M1
M2

Table V
Voltage (V)
9
2.99
6

Results
We plot Tables I, II, and III, with current as a function of voltage. As expected, it shows a
linear relationship between both magnitudes. According to Ohm's Law, this relationship
must be:
𝑉 =𝑅∗𝐼
So the slope of our graphs must be the value of the resistance.

Table I
10
9
8

Voltage (V)

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0

20

40

60

80

100

Current (mA)

Calculate the slope with the data of the graph:
𝑅=

9−2
7
=
= 100
−3
(88.5 − 18.5) ∗ 10
0.07

And we verify that it corresponds to the value of the 100-ohm resistor used in practice.

Table II
10
9
8

Voltage (V)

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0

10

20

30

40

50

Current (mA)

Calculate the slope with the data of the g...

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Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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