3 Bibliography Annotations

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grrfzvgu72

Humanities

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Attached are the guidelines for 3 annotations needed. Also attached is the proposal and two written bibliography annotations that have already been completed. The highlighted area is the topic for project

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Course Project: Annotated Bibliography (Part I, Two Annotations required) Annotated Bibliography Assignment: This week (Part I) you are to create a complete Annotated Bibliography for 2 academic scholarly sources, which include your introduction and thesis, publication details, and the annotation (see below for examples of each component). In week 4, you will complete this process for 3 additional sources. A total of 5 academic-scholarly sources are required for completion of your final research project. Scholarship means that • the author has a Ph.D. or other terminal degree, • the work appears in a multi-volume, peer-reviewed journal, • and has ample references at the end. Good annotations • capture publication details, • offer a student introduction and thesis, and • a detailed reading of the source, covering the following: 1. Offers the student's introduction and thesis to the best extent s/he knows it at this point in time, 2. Summarizes key points, and 3. identifies key terms (using quotation marks, and citing a page in parentheses); 4. Locates controversies or "problems" raised by the articles; 5. States whether the student agrees or disagrees and gives reasons; 6. Locates one or two quotations to be used in the final research project; and 7. Evaluates the ways in which this article is important and has helped the student to focus his/her understanding. Example Introduction/Thesis to a Student Paper: It never ceases to amaze me that we pay so little attention to the greatest bulk of our intelligence—that is, the quality of thinking that helps us adapt, deal with stress, love, and live lives of fulfillment. Aristotle argued that educating the mind and not the heart is no education at all. For decades, educators have focused on cognitive skills because they are testable and, therefore, metrics can be applied to them. This kind of education, testing, and then metrically interpreting results has governed American education for decades. And the results have been losses of creativity, imagination, courtesy, civic interest, and the ability to invent businesses that serve people and advance us as a society. Although measurable skills are important, they are not exclusively important, and in fact lose value when separated from an education in the heart, the spirit, and the abstract qualities that make students fully human and excellent participants in a healthy society. Example Publication Detail Capture: Mezirow, J. (2003). Transformative learning as discourse. Journal of Transformative Education, 1(1), 58-63. . Annotation Example: In this article, Mezirow (2003) makes a distinction between "instrumental" and "communicative" learning. "Instrumental learning" refers to those processes which measure and gage learning, such as tests, grades, comments, quizzes, attendance records and the like. "Communicative learning," on the other hand, refers to understanding created over time between individuals in what Mezirow calls "criticaldialectical-discourse," (p. 59) which is a fancy way of saying, important conversation between 2 or more speakers. Another key idea Mezirow discusses is "transformative learning," (p. 61) which changes the mind, the heart, the values and beliefs of people so that they may act better in the world. Mezirow argues that "hungry, desperate, homeless, sick, destitute, and intimidated people obviously cannot participate fully and freely in discourse" (p. 59). On the one hand, he is right: there are some people who cannot fully engage because their crisis is so long and deep, they are prevented. But, I don't think Mezirow should make the blanket assumption that everyone in unfortunate circumstances is incapable of entering the discourse meaningfully. One thing is certain: if we gave as much attention to the non-instrumental forms of intelligence--like goodness, compassion, forgiveness, wonder, self-motivation, creativity, humor, love, and other non-measured forms of intelligence in our school curriculums, we'd see better people, actors in the world, and interested investigators than we currently have graduating high school. FYI…….As I said in a warning in week 2, I don't like the way Devry has made me describe academic sources. Almost none, for example, mention the author's academic degrees, so they are unlikely to say "PhD," for instance. If you are unsure of a source, just email me the link or citation and I'd be glad to tell you (plus this week and next week, if I have to reject a source, I'll tell you to replace it and give you your points back if you do). When it comes to what you're finding, I'd search through the library - Devry subscribes to a lot of these publications. If you find something with a paywall, you should try contacting a librarian about it - oftentimes they can get it for you free of charge (we sometimes subscribe or sometimes can get another library to loan it, in which case you want to ask sooner rather than later). Course Project: Proposal Create a proposal of 2 pages that references one academic scholarly source for the research project you intend to complete. This project should engage at least one academic source, should include an introduction and thesis to the best extent that you know it at this point in time, and should locate a central controversy that requires deft and subtle handling. Be sure to adhere to APA style for in-text citation and final reference page. (No cover page is needed.) Select a project from among those suggested on the Course Project page under Course Home or discuss a special topic with your professor. Suggested Topics of Investigation Here are suggested topics, which you may elect to use or not use. If you wish to work outside of these suggestions, be sure to clear your project with your professor. • Compare and contrast society during the early Renaissance in Europe to contemporary society • Compare and contrast human understanding of the nature of revenge prior to and after the creation of Hamlet • Analyze the themes, imagery or interpretation of The Waste Land and describe how one or more of these are found in contemporary society • Evaluate the work of Artemisia Gentileschi Renaissance Artist and interpret why she is considered an early feminist • Analyze views of women's reproductive solutions in the 19th Century and interpret their historical and contemporary impact. • Distinguish the essential differences between the major thought of Plato and Aristotle and use the information to illustrate the impact of philosophy on contemporary views on a given them (life, freedom, power, equality, and more) • Examine views of warfare and battle throughout the ages and provide an interpretation that explains the evolution of the faceless war • Analyze the impact of the Industrial Age and the rise of of capitalism and discuss the key features of both and their influence on contemporary society • Investigate the history of slavery and discuss the ways in which this history impacts contemporary society HISTORY OF SLAVERY 1 Thesis statement: Slavery was a form of human degradation as it was controversial to the right to human dignity. Introduction Slavery resulted from the slave trade. Slave trade was a type of trade that involved the buying and selling of human beings who would later on work in plantations. The buyers were mostly the white people while the commodity sold was the black person especially the black men. The blacks were sold as a result of their strength and their ability to cope with different tropical illnesses which meant that the white person would have sufficient labor for his plantation farms (Franklin & Moss, 2009). They worked in different plantations including cotton plantations among others. The slaves were mistreated and underpaid and they had very bad working conditions. Slavery was hence a form of human degradation as it was controversial to the right to human dignity. History of Slavery There lacks a written report that clearly stipulates the exact period in which slavery started. Most authors claim that slavery begun in Mesopotamia and other ancient civilizations like Egypt while others attribute slavery to Africa especially West-Africa. Jurisdictions such as the Ancient Egypt sold people in order to pay for debts; for example, the youngest daughter would be sold to the king in order to pay for a debt that the father of the household was unable to pay. Thus, before the beginning of slave trade African communities had already participated in the vice although at the time they did not consider the act as being slavery. Slave trade which contributed to slavery entailed the buying and selling of human beings. HISTORY OF SLAVERY 2 The process involved the buyer, a merchant, and the seller. The sellers would capture the slaves and give them to the merchant who would then transport the slaves to other countries. The buyers would purchase the slaves and the price offered for the slave would differ depending on the strength of the individual and the capabilities among other physical attributes. The TransSaharan slave trade which involved West Africa countries established the trade. The Arabs would be the merchants who would purchase the slaves from individuals who would raid communities and capture them. The Arabs would then transport the slaves through the use of a caravan. The journey across the Sahara was tough due to the weather conditions and thus most slaves would end up dying while some would be too weak to get to the Indian Ocean. The weak slaves were either shot or abandoned by the merchants. After arriving at the Indian Ocean port, the merchants would transport the slaves to different parts of the world (Franklin & Moss, 2009). After the Trans- Saharan trade came the Trans- Atlantic trade which involved a voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. David Livingstone who was a missionary observed the trade and recorded it as depicting the heartlessness of the people that he met in Africa. A number of countries legalized the trade in the 1600's including New York and New Jersey among others. Over time, the slaves' functions increased and Britain actually used the slaves to fight in the First and the Second World War. However, the trade was abolished when some of the children of the slaves including Marcus Garvey formed associations to demand equal rights and the abolition of slavery. Conclusion Slavery had a number of consequences. Some of the most common ones include the reduction in the population size of the Africans and the brutal nature of the raids that occurred. Although slave trade was abolished, some countries like Nigeria still report cases of slavery. The HISTORY OF SLAVERY Universal Declaration of Human Rights stipulates that every individual has a right to human dignity. The Act also protects individuals from being enslaved or oppressed. 3 HISTORY OF SLAVERY 4 References Franklin, J. H., & Moss, A. A. (2009). From slavery to freedom: A history of African Americans. New York: Knopf. Running head: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Annotated Bibliography Name Institution 1 ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 2 Annotated Bibliography Thesis Statement: The trade in human beings for cheap labor was one of the darkest periods in the history of the world. Although slavery was abolished over a century and a half ago, the impacts of its history are present in most contemporary societies and are responsible for the ethnic disparities that are prevalent in several aspects of society including the lack of right to human dignity. Annotation Acharya, A., Blackwell, M., & Sen, M. (2016). The political legacy of American slavery. The Journal of Politics, 78(3), 621-641. In this article, Acharya, Blackwell, & Sen (2016) examined the origin of slavery in the United States so as to use the information to interpret the behavior of the people living in the southern part of the country. They argued that the “theory of contemporary racial threat” is inadequate in explaining the attitude of the citizens of “Southern counties” especially those regarding their socio-political behavior including opposition to affirmative action, propagation of racial sentiments, and low rate of interactions with African American. Rather than focus on the flaws of the existing theory on the connection between the origin of slavery and contemporary disparities issues, Acharya et al. (2016) promulgated an encompassing theory that is based on the highlighted the agenda of the Southern whites with political and economic intentions to continue their racial behavior contemporary societies. In my viewpoint, the “theory of historical persistence of political attitude” provided by Acharya et al. (2016) in explaining the continuous racial tension in the American South is an ideal theoretical framework for explaining the “regional differences in contemporary white attitudes toward African American”(p.621). A clear ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY inference from this article is that slave practices are still present in some regions of the United States as evidenced by the participation of Southern whites “partisan identification, attitudes on affirmative action, level of racial resentment and attitudes towards African Americans” (p.638). Barner, J. R., Okech, D., & Camp, M. A. (2014). Socio-economic inequality, human trafficking, and the global slave trade. Societies, 4(2), 148-160. Barner, Okech, & Camp (2014) argued that the problem of human trafficking that is creating human dignity issues in modern societies across the world has its roots in the “socioeconomic inequality” framework of slavery. The imbalance of authority that exists between the powerful and the weak is driving the human trafficking business that supplies the inputs for the global sex trade. One of the key points of the discussions presented by Barner, Okech, & Camp (2014) in this article is the role of “unequal power relations” in the perpetration of the human trafficking trade in women and children in developing countries, as well as the link between slavery and social inequality. Personally, I agree with the recommendation that governments and the people need to strengthen the strategies used by the organizations listed in their recommendation to combat the problems of modern slavery, which is represented by human trafficking and social inequality. Finally, when the efforts of “social welfare advocates and international organizations are increased in the fight against the problems of social and economic inequality, it is then that human trafficking can be addressed completely. 3
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Attached.

Running head: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Annotated Bibliography
Name
Institution

1

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

2
Annotated Bibliography

Thesis Statement: The trade in human beings for cheap labor was one of the darkest periods in
the history of the world. Although slavery was abolished over a century and a half ago, the
impacts of its history are present in most contemporary societies and are responsible for the
ethnic disparities that are prevalent in several aspects of society including the lack of right to
human dignity.
Annotation
Acharya, A., Blackwell, M., & Sen, M. (2016). The political legacy of American slavery. The
Journal of Politics, 78(3), 621-641.
In this article, Acharya, Blackwell, & Sen (2016) examined the origin of slavery in the
United States so as to use the information to interpret the behavior of the people living in
the southern part of the country. They argued that the “theory of contemporary racial
threat” is inadequate in explaining the attitude of the citizens of “Southern counties”
especially those regarding their socio-political behavior including opposition to
affirmative action, propagation of racial sentiments, and low rate of interactions with
African American. Rather than focus on the flaws of the existing theory on the
connection between the origin of slavery and contemporary disparities issues, Acharya et
al. (2016) promulgated an encompassing theory that is based on the highlighted the
agenda of the Southern whites with political and economic intentions to continue their
racial behavior contemporary societies. In my viewpoint, the “theory of historical
persistence of political attitude” provided by A...


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