What is your leadership Style, management homework help

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Based on your own leadership style preferences, what kind of leader are you?

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Book Excerpt YOUR LEADERSHIP LEGACY WHY LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE WILL MAKE YOU A BETTER LEADER TODAY By Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca Introduction Harvard Business School Press www.YourLeadershipLegacy.com Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Advance Praise for Your Leadership Legacy “After reading Your Leadership Legacy, any leader would wish that they had read it at the start of their career. It’s a book that actually forces you to think how your day-to-day actions are molding your eventual measure as a leader. By planning for the impact you will have on your people and your organization, you become a better leader today.” --Thomas C. Leppert, Chairman and CEO, The Turner Corporation “This important and useful book goes to the heart of leadership today. It challenges thoughtful leaders to ask themselves not just what it takes to get ahead but, more importantly, what it means to leave something lasting behind.” --Alan M. Webber, Founding Editor, Fast Company “Your Leadership Legacy should inspire many leaders to empower the people who matter at work, at home, and in their communities. Galford and Maruca will teach you how to learn as much from your leadership mistakes as from your successes.” --Carol Goldberg, President, The AVCAR Group, Ltd. Purchase at: © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca Bulk sales available from: www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 2 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents Acknowledgments Introduction Part I: Making Leadership Last 1. Building a Legacy: Impact, Duration and Judgment Part II: Impact 2. Locating your Impact 3. Expected Impact Versus Instinctive Influence 4. Your Intentional Legacy (Writing a Legacy Statement) Part III: Duration 5. Designing for Duration (Pressure-Testing Your Statement) 6. From Statement to Action, Audits and Beyond Part IV: Judgment 7. Challenges, Pitfalls, Tripwires and Other Bad Stuff 8. Legacies and the Responsibilities of Leadership Chapter Notes About the Authors Index © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 3 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Introduction Is it ever too early to think about the kind of long-term impact you’ll have on your organization? Is it ever too early to think about what people will think, say, or do, after your tenure as a leader has ended, as a result of having worked with you? We think the answer to both questions is no. It’s never too early to think about the kind of influence your leadership will have after you’ve retired or taken a position with another company. In fact, we believe that the earlier leaders begin to consider their leadership legacy, the better leaders they will be. Much of the time, people begin to consider the overall impact of their leadership when they’re about to retire or when they’re moving on to a senior-level job in another company. The legacies they’ve formed at work are faits accompli, and the leader, looking back, is sometimes faced with a host of unsettling could haves and would haves. This short book proposes to turn that common behavior on its head. The central idea is that one’s desired leadership legacy should be a catalyst for action rather than a result considered after the fact. Why? It’s because as best as we can tell, you have only one chance in this world, so it’s important not to waste it. And if recent, quarterly, or even yearly results are your only benchmark, you might accomplish only small, discontinuous wins and never have the kind of impact you could have as a manager or a leader. By contrast, being intentional about your desired long-term impact helps you both in the short run and in the long run. This book offers lessons that have emerged from our experiences working with and talking to CEOs, professionals, and executives from a wide range of organizations, including Fortune 100 companies, global nonprofit entities, large banks, and small design firms. Rob’s extensive experience includes working for more than thirty years with top and senior-level executives from a wide variety of organizations. For the first fifteen © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 4 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ years of his career, he was a consultant and adviser in the world of professional services; in the past fifteen years, he has worked more closely, and often one-on-one, with highperforming senior executives from a wide range of organizations, listening to them, teaching them, and following their progress. Regina has spent the better part of her professional career listening to senior-level managers and helping them clarify their thinking, first in her capacity as an editor at Harvard Business Review and, more recently, working with Rob at the Center for Executive Development in Boston. Specifically for this book, we also spoke with recently retired top managers, senior managers whose retirements were imminent, CEOs in midcareer, and a host of new leaders. (As often as possible, these executives are identified by name in the book. For privacy reasons, however, many of the executives who shared stories of frustration, or stories of hardship, have been given aliases.) In the course of our conversations, these leaders helped us develop and refine the idea of using a legacy as a forward-thinking tool. They also helped us hone the definition of what a leadership legacy should be. We found that the more people reflected on the impact of their leadership, the less often they described it in professional or corporate terms. They spoke of the aspirations they have for the companies they manage, but increasingly they attributed importance to the one-to-one influence they might have on colleagues, direct reports, and the people in the organization at large. The more they thought, the more they also began to talk about their desired work legacies in personal terms. “I hope that my legacy at work will be the same things for which my family will remember me, and be proud of” was a common theme. Put simply, we found that looking forward, people wanted to achieve success in organizational or performance terms. But looking back, they wanted to know that their efforts were seen—and felt—in a positive way by the individuals they worked with directly and indirectly. © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 5 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ We also heard, however, how difficult it is to take the time to consider such personal legacies in the course of running a company. Big-picture thinking about the long-term impact of a leader’s actions—in terms of corporate growth or direction—is built into the strategic process at most companies. But the same can’t be said of the longterm impact of a leader’s influence on colleagues and employees, even though that’s the realm in which most of the leaders we spoke with ultimately wanted to make a lasting and significant difference. As one executive summed up, “I want my leadership to have a positive and lasting effect on the company, of course. But when I think about how I want to be remembered, or about how I would like to think I influence others, it’s a very personal thing. The issue is that there isn’t an opportunity to connect those personal aspirations with the day-to-day work of running the company. It’s like there’s a way to think about long-term performance, on the company level. And in the course of ‘performing,’ there are these opportunities to make a difference on a personal level. But there’s a divide; there’s no way to connect the two.” In practical terms, this book’s first goal is to bridge that divide. Most senior managers well understand the intrinsic link between daily behavior and long-term impact. That understanding, however, is usually implicit. The structure we propose in this book— what we call legacy thinking—makes the link explicit. Legacy thinking is a tool through which leaders can filter and assess their decisions. It provides the kind of perspective that rarely makes it to the table in the course of the daily pressures of running an organization. It also serves as a powerful check to help leaders ensure that their priorities—personal and organizational—are reflected in their actions. This book’s second goal is to help great leaders leave positive legacies. Successful companies almost always have strong leaders, but sometimes organizational success comes at a personal price. All of us can name people who built financially successful companies at the cost of personal relationships or their own satisfaction. We © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 6 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ can also name people who excelled at driving a company forward but left peers and direct reports vowing, “I’m never going to behave that way.” Did they produce positive results, in terms of the organization’s success? Yes. But they left negative leadership legacies. When top managers leave in their wake strong companies and individuals who can perpetuate that strength in a positive and healthy way, the result is both leadership and legacy at their best. Ultimately, that’s what we’d like to help leaders achieve. Rob Galford and Regina Maruca, August 2006 © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 7 Assignment: Assess Leadership Styles ' Instructions For this assignment: Complete several leadership inventories to identify your own leadership style preferences. Report on the results of your inventories. Are you surprised at the results or do you affirm the findings from the inventories? Based on your own leadership style preferences, what kind of leader are you? What types of trainings are most suited to meet your learning needs? How might your own style preferences bias you to other types of trainings, which might be best suited for other stakeholders within the workplace? What do you see as needed areas of improvement for yourself? How will you begin to address those areas? Length: 5-7 pages not including title page and reference page. References: Include at least 3-5 scholarly resources. Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts that are presented in the course and provide new thoughts and insights relating directly to this topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Books and resources School Leadership and Administration: Important Concepts, Case Studies & Simulations Inventory 1 Team member self-assessment - Personal Coach What skills do effective team members possess? The Team Member Inventory asks questions to help you reflect on the following skills: • Cooperation - demonstrating sensitivity and tolerance, compromise, commitment to a common goal. • Influence – demonstrating how to lead or facilitate a group in achieving a common goal and resolving conflicts on a team. • Problem Solving – using creative and critical thinking to find solutions to a problem in collaboration with others. • Communication – writing and speaking with team members to receive and relay important information. • Focus on Team Improvement – monitoring and modifying team goals and identifying ways to improve team performance. Rate on each Team Member Skill Cooperating with others 4.2 out of 5.00 Influencing Team Members 3.8 out of 5.00 Solving Problems as a Team Member 3.667 out of 5.00 Communicating with a Team 4.5 out of 5.00 Focusing on Team Improvement 4.6 out of 5.00 Your responses show an average rating of 4.15 for team member If your average self-rating equals 4 – 5 You're Ready to Help Others Grow as Team Members "Suggested Action Plan Help Others Grow! Reflect • How can you teach others to be effective team members? • In which of the five team member skills can you be a role model for others? Action Items for Growth • Mentor a younger member in the SkillsUSA chapter on the skills required to be a part of a team • Write an article for the chapter newsletter about what it takes to be an effective team member • Select and conduct a team building activity with a team you work with Resources to Consult • www.wikipedia.com • SkillsUSA PDP Materials The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork, by John Maxwell The 17 Essential Qualities of Being a Team Player, by John Inventory 2 – Leader self-assessment – Current performance What skills do effective leaders possess? The Leader Inventory asks questions to help you reflect on the following skills: • Working with Others – observing and coaching others’ performance, collaborating and empowering others to act for ultimate performance. • Visioning – picturing what the future might look like and creating the same image for and with others. • Improvement and Action Planning – improving actions, plans or skills by reviewing past performance and planning accordingly. • Motivating – recognizing motivational needs of others by observing their strengths and weaknesses and matching abilities to tasks. Rate on each Leader Skill Working with Others 3.2 out of 5.00 Visioning 4.6 out of 5.00 Improvement and Action Planning 3.167 out of 5.00 Motivating Others 3.8 out of 5.00 Average Self-Rating for Leader 3.08 out of 5.00 If your average self-rating equals 3 - 3.99 If your average self-rating equals 3 - 3.99 You're Ready to Continue Growing Skills as a Leader Suggested Action Plan Grow Your Skills! Reflect • How are you currently a leader? • What leadership experience do you already have? • Who is a role model for you, and what leadership skills do they have which you admire? Action Items for Growth • Consider a leader in your community. Journal about the qualities to which their followers are attracted. • Lead the planning of an event for your chapter. Create committees and guide your chapter members through the process. • Find someone who can serve as a mentor to you. They can help you set goals and hold you accountable for achieving the goals. • Watch the movie “Drumline” and analyze Devon’s growth in character and movement toward becoming a positive leader. Resource to consult Developing the Leaders Around You, by John Maxwell Leadership 101: What Every Leader Needs to Know, by John Maxwell Trombone Player Wanted, dvd series by Marcus Buckingham People/Teen People magazines Inventory 3 Employee Self-assessment What skills do effective employees? There are several skills important to participating effectively as an employee. They include: • Professionalism – employing a practical understanding of workplace expectations and culture. • Monitor Learning Needs – using efficient learning techniques to acquire and apply knowledge and skills to adapt to new situations. • Take Action – researching potential employment opportunities and evaluating them in comparison to abilities and long-term goals. Rate on each employability skill Demonstrate Professionalism 4.6 out of 5 Monitor Learning Needs 4 out of 5 Take Action 4 out of 5 Average Self-Rating for Employee 4.2 out 5 If your average self-rating equals 4 - 5 You're Ready to Help Others Grow as an Employee "Suggested Action Plan Help Others Grow! Reflect • How can you teach others to be effective employees? Action Items for Growth • Lead your SkillsUSA Chapter in hosting a job fair for the school or community • Organize job shadow opportunities for SkillsUSA members Resources to consult www.monster.com www.jobshadow.org www.streamingfutures.com From College to Career: Entry-Level Resumes for Any Major From Accounting to Zoology, by Donald Asher The Only Resume and Cover Letter Book You’ll Ever Need: 600 Resumes for All Industries 600 Cover Letters for Every Situation150 Positions from Entry Level to CEO, by Richard Wallace Book Excerpt YOUR LEADERSHIP LEGACY WHY LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE WILL MAKE YOU A BETTER LEADER TODAY By Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca Introduction Harvard Business School Press www.YourLeadershipLegacy.com Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Advance Praise for Your Leadership Legacy “After reading Your Leadership Legacy, any leader would wish that they had read it at the start of their career. It’s a book that actually forces you to think how your day-to-day actions are molding your eventual measure as a leader. By planning for the impact you will have on your people and your organization, you become a better leader today.” --Thomas C. Leppert, Chairman and CEO, The Turner Corporation “This important and useful book goes to the heart of leadership today. It challenges thoughtful leaders to ask themselves not just what it takes to get ahead but, more importantly, what it means to leave something lasting behind.” --Alan M. Webber, Founding Editor, Fast Company “Your Leadership Legacy should inspire many leaders to empower the people who matter at work, at home, and in their communities. Galford and Maruca will teach you how to learn as much from your leadership mistakes as from your successes.” --Carol Goldberg, President, The AVCAR Group, Ltd. Purchase at: © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca Bulk sales available from: www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 2 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents Acknowledgments Introduction Part I: Making Leadership Last 1. Building a Legacy: Impact, Duration and Judgment Part II: Impact 2. Locating your Impact 3. Expected Impact Versus Instinctive Influence 4. Your Intentional Legacy (Writing a Legacy Statement) Part III: Duration 5. Designing for Duration (Pressure-Testing Your Statement) 6. From Statement to Action, Audits and Beyond Part IV: Judgment 7. Challenges, Pitfalls, Tripwires and Other Bad Stuff 8. Legacies and the Responsibilities of Leadership Chapter Notes About the Authors Index © 2006 Robert M. Galford and Regina Fazio Maruca www.yourleadershiplegacy.com 3 Your Leadership Legacy – Why Looking Toward the Future will Make you a Better Leader Today ________________________________________________________________ Introduction Is it ever too early to think about the kind of long-term impact you’ll have on your organization? Is it ever too early to think about what people will think, say, or do, after your tenure as a leader has ended, as a result of having worked with you? We think the answer to both questions is no. It’s never too early to think about the kind of influence your leadership will have after you’ve retired or taken a position with another company. In fact, we believe that the earlier leaders begin to consider their leadership legacy, the better leaders they will be. Much of the time, people begin to consider the overall impact of their leadership when they’re about to retire or when they’re moving on to a senior- ...
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