IT 625 Southern New Hampshire Leading Health Service Organization Discussion

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IT 625

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IT 625 Final Project Guidelines and Rubric Overview Note: In order to successfully complete this project, you will need to carefully review the Final Project Guidelines and Rubric document and the Medical Informatics case study documents, located in the Assignments section of the course. IT project managers are often called to manage new projects, or to assume leadership over troubled projects. In this course, you will have the opportunity to resolve conflict within project teams for a fictitious project, determine strategies to improve the outcome of the project, and deliver a comprehensive project plan that will allow you to develop the skills necessary to become a successful IT project manager. For your final project, you will analyze a case that portrays a troubled information technology project, a project team experiencing conflict, and specific financial and timeline requirements. From this analysis you will develop a comprehensive project plan to attend to the team and communication issues and the project status issues. Throughout this course, we will refer to this fictitious project as the Medical Informatics case study. Developing the comprehensive project plan will allow you the opportunity to apply the leadership, communication, and collaboration strategies you have learned during this course to a real-world situation. IT projects, like any other projects, can go off course for a variety of reasons, causing stress and strife in project teams. In addition, this assessment will allow you the opportunity to integrate the various strategies, practices, and concepts you have learned into a new project plan to get the failed project back on track. Your plan should carry the project through completion, and will contain all of the necessary sub-plans (i.e., scope plan, communication plan, schedule plan), tasks, information, and visual elements to ensure project success. The project is supported by five milestones, which will be submitted at various points throughout the course to scaffold learning and ensure quality final submissions. These milestones will be submitted in Modules Two, Three, Five, Six, and Seven. The final submission will occur in Module Nine. This assessment will address the following course outcomes:      Recommend suitable leadership strategies for resolving conflict, developing cohesive information technology project teams, and delivering highperformance results and improved business value Utilize appropriate analytical techniques for forecasting information technology project success and realizing the value of prospective technology projects Assess the extent to which various artifacts and strategies from technology projects impact actual project outcome and feasibility Create actionable information technology project solutions and deliverables for ensuring and monitoring project success Determine the extent of corrective actions necessary for the success of information technology projects through the application of project management software tools Prompt To ensure the IT project can continue on and meet success, you will recommend strategies for managing conflict, communication, and strengthening the team; evaluate the current state of the project; determine the extent to which corrective action must be taken; and address project planning and controls. You will create several artifacts during this course, such as Gantt charts, a work breakdown schedule, and a communications plan. These elements will be used to inform your final project. They should be included in the appendix of your project plan. This project will be completed in stages called milestones. Each milestone you complete in this course will be used to build to the submission of your final project. Each milestone has a specific set of guidelines, with a separate document for each. Milestones should be completed in a draft format. Your instructor will provide feedback to you on all of the milestones, and you should use this feedback to create a final, polished project plan for your final submission. Many of the milestones will be done in outline or table form, but you should think of these as rough drafts or sketches that will contribute to your final project. Also, you should submit and retain any supporting documents, often referred to as “artifacts” in this document. These may include, but are not limited to, Gantt charts, work breakdown schedules, and/or a communication plan. Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed: I. Conflict Resolution Plan A. Team Dynamics: Analyze the team structure, dynamics, and conflict. Things to consider include: 1. The roles and titles, reporting structure, and history of the team 2. Stage of the five-stage team development model this team is in (forming, storming, norming, performing, adjourning) 3. Cause of conflict 4. Skills the team is lacking based on their roles B. Conflict Resolution Leadership: Recommend appropriate leadership strategies to resolve the conflict within the team. Consider the following: 1. Leadership style for current stage of the team development (guiding, coaching, structuring, directing) 2. How to determine appropriate skills (soft and hard) for each role 3. A strategy to employ to resolve the conflict (assertiveness, accommodation, avoidance, or compromise) C. Motivation and Confidence: Recommend strategies for motivating and strengthening that will allow you to develop a cohesive information technology team that will deliver high-performance results and add business value. Provide support for your recommendations. II. Project Evaluation A. Status Evaluation: Evaluate the project status to determine the current state of and issues with the project. You may need to evaluate the existing deliverable and tracking for the project, such as Gantt charts, to provide an accurate representation of the project’s state. B. Project Analysis: Examine the existing artifacts and determine current and potential problems that need to be addressed with them immediately. What information should be gathered to determine current variance and maintain control of project? You might consider these ideas in your analysis: 1. The impact of scope creep 2. The significance of the baseline 3. The impacts of baseline changes 4. The estimated vs. actual costs C. Forecasting: Assuming the project issues persist, provide a detailed prediction of future performance in terms of timeliness and costs. The following ideas could be considered: 1. Assumptions that guide the forecasting 2. Projected end date of the project (schedule variance) 3. Cost to complete the project (cost variance) 4. Forecasted overrun at completion (estimates at completion) D. Impact of the Past: To what extent, based on your project evaluation and analyses, did the past deliverables, strategies, and lack of effective project management influence the failure of the project? E. Corrective Actions: To what extent will corrective actions be required to avoid project failure? Include supportive detail from your project evaluation and relevant resources. Things to consider include: 1. Immediate actions necessary to rescue the project 2. Target dates to rescue the project 3. Necessary steps to ensure the long-term success of the project III. Project Charter A. Project Objectives: Determine new project objectives based on an examination of company goals, needs, the project analysis, and corrective action requirements. B. Project Strategy: Establish a general project strategy that will outline the overall path to the new project objectives and lead to successful completion, based on organizational and feasibility considerations. As you are developing your strategy, consider aspects such as: 1. The existing problem (description, impact, who is affected, cost of ignoring the problem) 2. The strengths and weaknesses of the internal environment 3. The opportunities and threats in the external environment 4. The best solution to the problem (feasibility study, alternatives) 5. The project payback period 6. The selection model C. Project Communications Planning: Document who to keep informed about the project and how to keep them informed. Ideas to consider may include: 1. Who needs project information to make decisions and/or contribute to project progress (stakeholder analysis) 2. When the information will be provided 3. The information that is pertinent to stakeholders who contribute to the project’s progress (scope changes, action items, deliverables issues) 4. Where the information resides 5. How the information will be collected IV. Project Planning and Controls A. Project Scope Planning: Establish the project scope plan and controls. What are the business requirements? What are the system requirements (software and hardware)? In establishing your project scope plan, you might consider these aspects: 1. Requirements (requirements traceability matrix) 2. Existing work breakdown structure 3. Person responsible for each requirement (responsibility assignment matrix) B. Project Schedule Planning: Develop a comprehensive project schedule plan outlining completion dates, tasks, and relevant milestones. You should include all relevant artifacts that pertain to scheduling aspects of the project plan. In your project schedule plan, you could consider: 1. Tasks that must be completed before others may begin 2. Tasks that can be done at the same time 3. Durations of each task 4. Planned vs. actual dates C. Project Cost Planning and Control: Establish a cost control plan with strategies to help maintain prospective value of the new project with respect to expected expenditures and added business values. As you are developing your cost control plan, you could consider aspects such as these: 1. The cost–benefit analysis 2. The TCO 3. Budgeted vs. actual costs 4. The earned value of the project D. Project Risk Planning: Craft a plan for identifying and monitoring risk. In your plan, you could consider: 1. The amount of uncertainty in the project and how to deal with it 2. The threats of greatest concern 3. How each threat should be dealt with E. Risk Control: Determine corrective actions and controls to deal with uncertainty and its impact on the project, based on your risk plan. Ideas to consider may include: 1. Appropriate quantification of the risks (probability vs. impact) 2. Contingency funding or time buffers in place to handle threats F. Project Quality Planning: Craft a plan for ensuring quality of the project outcomes that identifies acceptable performance standards and recommended recovery strategy. Ideas to consider may include: 1. Key performance indicators of quality 2. Important factors in defining quality 3. How to measure quality Milestones Milestone One: Draft of Conflict Resolution Plan In Module Two, you will submit your draft of a conflict resolution plan based on the provided Medical Informatics case study. Given the case you have analyzed, construct a conflict resolution plan that addresses the various points of issue within the project team. You will be writing this plan for your management group. For the purposes of this milestone, you will complete a draft only. Your instructor will provide feedback, which you can incorporate into your final project in Module Nine. This milestone is graded with the Milestone One Rubric. Milestone Two: Project Evaluation Draft In Module Three, you will submit a draft of a project evaluation based on the provided Medical Informatics case study. Given the case you have analyzed, draft a project evaluation that includes a status evaluation, project analysis, forecasting for the future, evaluating the impact of the past, and discussing what corrective actions will be required to avoid project failure. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Two Rubric. Milestone Three: Project Charter Draft In Module Five, you will submit a draft of the project charter based on the provided Medical Informatics case study. Given the case you have analyzed, you will draft a charter including the project objectives, project strategy, and a communications plan. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Three Rubric. Milestone Four: Scope, Cost, and Quality Planning Report Draft In Module Six, you will submit a draft of a scope, cost, and quality planning report based on the provided Medical Informatics case study. Given the case you have analyzed, you will draft a report including plans for the scope, cost, and quality controls. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Four Rubric. Milestone Five: Project Schedule Planning, Risk Planning, and Risk Control Report Draft In Module Seven, you will submit a draft of a schedule planning, risk planning, and risk control draft based on the provided Medical Informatics case study. Given the case you have analyzed, you will draft a report including project schedule planning, project risk planning, and risk control strategies. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Five Rubric. Final Submission: Comprehensive Project Plan In Module Nine, you will submit a comprehensive project plan. This plan will include information from all of your milestone assignments, brought together into a cohesive, well-written project plan that incorporates instructor feedback received throughout the course on your various milestones. Your final plan will include a conflict resolution plan, project evaluation, project charter, and project planning and controls. This final project is graded using the Final Project Rubric (below). Deliverables Milestone Deliverable One Draft of Conflict Resolution Plan Two Project Evaluation Draft Module Due Grading Two Graded separately; Milestone One Rubric Three Graded separately; Milestone Two Rubric Three Project Charter Draft Five Graded separately; Milestone Three Rubric Four Scope, Cost, and Quality Planning Report Draft Project Schedule, Risk Planning, and Risk Control Report Draft Comprehensive Project Plan Six Graded separately; Milestone Four Rubric Seven Graded separately; Milestone Five Rubric Nine Graded separately; Final Project Rubric Five Final Project Rubric Guidelines for Submission: The comprehensive project plan should be clearly and professionally written and organized, with appropriate citations in APA format. All artifacts relevant to your plan should be included in the appendix. Critical Elements Conflict Resolution Plan: Team Dynamics Exemplary (100%) Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences insight into the causes and relationships between dynamics and conflict within the team Conflict Resolution Meets “Proficient” criteria and Plan: Conflict draws insightful conclusions or Resolution Leadership inferences about the leadership style, the conflict type, and gaps between team roles and skill sets needed Conflict Resolution Meets “Proficient” criteria and Plan: Motivation and evidences keen insight into the Confidence relevance of motivation and expectations on team trust Project Evaluation: Status Evaluation Project Evaluation: Project Analysis Project Evaluation: Forecasting Proficient (90%) Accurately analyzes the team structure, dynamics, and conflict Needs Improvement (70%) Analyzes the team structure, dynamics, and conflict, but with gaps in accuracy or detail Not Evident (0%) Does not analyze the team structure, dynamics, and conflict Value 6.4 Recommends appropriate leaderships strategies to resolve conflict Recommends leadership strategies to resolve conflict, but recommendations are not appropriate for the team Does not recommend leadership strategies to resolve conflict 6.4 Does not describe recommended motivational strategy to set team expectations 6.4 Does not evaluate the project status to determine the current state of and issues with the project Does not analyze existing artifacts to determine current and potential problems that need to be addressed Does not predict the future performance of the project based on a set of assumptions to reveal project costs and timeline issues 6.4 Recommends strategies for motivating and strengthening the team that are appropriate based on supporting information Recommends strategies for motivating and strengthening the team, but accompanying explanations are not supportive of recommendations or lack detail Meets “Proficient” criteria and Accurately evaluates the project Evaluates the project status to evidences keen insight into status status to determine the current determine the current state of evaluation state of and issues with the and issues with the project, but project with gaps in accuracy or detail Meets “Proficient” criteria and Comprehensively analyzes Analyzes the existing artifacts to evidences keen insight into existing artifacts to determine determine current and potential recognizing potential issues from current and potential problems problems that need to be existing evidence that need to be addressed addressed, but with gaps in detail Meets “Proficient” criteria and Logically predicts the future Predicts the future performance evidences keen insight into the performance of the project based of the project based on a set of impact of certain assumptions on on a set of assumptions to reveal assumptions to reveal project certain what-if scenarios project costs and timeline issues costs and timeline issues, but with gaps in logic or detail 6.4 6.4 Project Evaluation: Impact of the Past Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences keen insight into the influence of interplaying forces in project management Project Evaluation: Corrective Actions Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences intuitive insight into project corrective needs Project Charter: Project Meets “Proficient” criteria and Objectives evidences keen insight into determining objectives to drive project success Project Charter: Project Meets “Proficient” criteria and Strategy evidences keen insight into strategic methods for integrating the various interests of an IT project Project Charter: Project Meets “Proficient” criteria and Communications articulation exemplifies the Planning integration of best project management practices for the management of information among various project stakeholders Project Planning and Meets “Proficient” criteria and Controls: Project Scope articulation exemplifies the Planning integration of best project management practices for the capture and tracking of scope and requirements Project Planning and Meets “Proficient” criteria and Controls: Project articulation exemplifies the Schedule Planning integration of best project management practices for schedule creation and tracking Logically assesses the extent to which past deliverables, strategies, and lack of management influenced the failure of the project Accurately determines the extent to which corrective action will be required to avoid project failure, including support from project evaluation and relevant resources Determines new project objectives comprehensively and logically based on examination of company goals, needs, and the project analysis and corrective action requirements Establishes a general project strategy outlining the overall path to achieve project objectives based on organizational and feasibility considerations Crafts a communication plan that documents who and how to keep everyone informed about project Assesses the extent to which past deliverables, strategies, and lack of management influenced the failure of the project, but with gaps in logic Determines the extent to which corrective action will be required to avoid project failure, but with gaps in accuracy, detail, or support Determines new project objectives, but they are not comprehensively or logically based on examination of company goals, needs, and the project analysis and corrective action requirements Establishes a general project strategy outlining the overall path to achieve project objectives, but it is not based on organizational and feasibility considerations Crafts a communication plan that documents who and how to keep everyone informed about project, but lacks detail Does not assess the extent to which past deliverables, strategies, and lack of management influenced the failure of the project Does not determine the extent to which corrective action will be required to avoid project failure 6.4 4.75 Does not determine new project objectives 4.75 Does not establish a general project strategy outlining the overall path to achieve project objectives 6.4 Does not craft a communication plan that documents who and how to keep everyone informed about project 4.75 Establishes a detailed, applicable, Establishes a plan to capture and Does not establish a plan to and actionable plan to capture control project scope, but lacks capture and control project scope and control project scope detail, or plan is not applicable or actionable 4.75 Crafts a comprehensive and logical project schedule plan outlining completion dates, tasks, and relevant milestones 6.4 Crafts a project schedule plan Does not craft a project schedule outlining completion dates, tasks, plan outlining completion dates, and relevant milestones, but with tasks, and relevant milestones gaps in necessary artifacts, detail, or logic Project Planning and Controls: Project Cost Planning and Control Meets “Proficient” criteria and articulation exemplifies the integration of cost practices for ensuring project value Establishes cost control plan with appropriate strategies to help maintain prospective value of the new project as the project develops Project Planning and Controls: Project Risk Planning Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences intuitive insight regarding IT project risk Crafts a risk plan that accurately explores probability for relevant risk prevention strategies Project Planning and Controls: Risk Control Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences keen insight into best project management practices to handle unexpected risks Meets “Proficient” criteria and evidences keen insight regarding quality standards related to IT projects Accurately and comprehensively integrates aspects from risk planning into controls for risk Project Planning and Controls: Project Quality Planning Articulation of Response Crafts a quality plan to identify acceptable performance standards and recommended recovery strategy Submission is free of errors Submission has no major errors related to citations, grammar, related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization spelling, syntax, or organization and is presented in a professional and easy-to-read format Establishes cost control plan with strategies to help maintain prospective value of the new project as the project develops, but strategies are not appropriate given project information Crafts a risk plan that explores probability for risk prevention strategies, but with gaps in accuracy or relevancy Integrates aspects from risk planning into risk controls, but with gaps in detail or accuracy Does not establish cost control plan with strategies to help maintain prospective value of the new project as the project develops 4.75 Does not craft a risk plan that explores probability for risk prevention strategies 4.75 Does not integrate aspects from risk planning into risk controls 4.75 Crafts a quality plan to identify acceptable performance standards and recommended recovery strategy, but with gaps in accuracy or detail Submission has major errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that negatively impact readability and articulation of main ideas Does not craft a quality plan to identify acceptable performance standards and recommended recovery strategy 4.75 Submission has critical errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that prevent understanding of ideas Total 4.4 100% IT 625 Final Project Case Study: Medical Informatics Background Medical Informatics, a leading health services company, embarked on a new product development project. Medical Informatics needs to expand its clinical data warehouse (CDW) to ingest third-party data feeds from wellness vendor and onsite clinic data to incorporate this information to downstream employer group analytics and reporting processes. This expansion will also be used to develop new activity reports to message value on these products. The nature of the company’s business is that it operates in an extremely competitive environment that necessitates fast delivery to market so as to prevent competitor companies from gaining dominant market share with similar competitive products. Therefore, the key success factors of the project were time to market and quality. Cost of delivery was not a major concern. Scope The scope of the project was to create a modular software package to handle wellness vendor data to ensure appropriate preventative care is being tracked for members, including the systems changes, the vendor wellness database tables, and wellness vendor reporting. The project was divided into modules consisting of: wellness DB tables, promote tables, and wellness vendor reporting. A project manager was appointed, but has since left due to personal reasons. Time Scales The launch date was set as December 21, 2017. The product had to be ready for launch on this date, as all the marketing material would reflect this date and the launch had to precede the launch of similar products from competitors. The project kickoff was May 5, 2017. The tasks that had been completed prior to May 5, 2017 were the business case compilation and approval and the project team establishment. Technology The systems development was to be done using the MS Visual Studio programming language and SQL environment, which was new to the development team. The developers were sent on MS Visual Studio programming training two weeks prior to the project start. The developers were used to working in a Java programming environment and had not worked with any MS-oriented languages before. The new wellness vendor reports will integrate into the existing system located behind the intranet. These new reports, unlike the existing reports, will utilize both SQL Server and Teradata. SQL Server will control the security access and parameter selection for the reports. The application will then send the selected parameters to Teradata in order to populate the body of the report. Infrastructure Database Servers  MS SQL Server 2008 R2  Teradata 14 Reporting Servers  The system will use an SSRS deployment server. Development Tools    MS Visual Studio 2008 Shell SQL Server Business Intelligence Development Studio SQL Server Management Studio Business Requirements The current application will display the wellness vendor reports. The system generates SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) reports based on user-selected parameters. Users can choose to view reports in three formats: Excel 97-2003 (XLS), Portable Document Format (PDF), or Comma Separated Value (CSV). The exported data within Excel or CSV files will contain “user-friendly” headers and not database column headers. Scripts will execute on a weekly basis to import the following vendor sources into the target system:  Chip Rewards  Spire Scripts will execute on a monthly basis to import the following vendor sources into the target system: MDLive. Case Study Summary of Events Business Case Development The product development department developed the business case for the proposed new product, including projected cost/benefit analysis based on previous similar products and current market share. The business case was reviewed by executive management and approved. Requirements Definition The product development department developed the requirements specification for the new product. These requirements were specified based on the understanding level of the project team, which had many years of experience in the company and an extremely good understanding of the systems. Some of the finer details of the requirements, such as the reporting requirements and the final policy document wording, were not defined at this initial stage. The outstanding requirements would be agreed upon during the project, once the users had decided exactly what they wanted in this regard. Project Team Appointment John was appointed as the overall project manager. John had been with the company for 23 years and been involved in numerous projects for new product developments in the past. He knows the existing systems intimately and had good working relationships with all the various departments involved in product development and launch. The project team appointed consisted of people from various departments, all of whom had been involved in previous product development projects. Their knowledge of the systems and applications is extensive. After delivery of Module Two, John left due to personal reasons. Project Kick-off The product development executive, the sponsor of the project, chaired the project kick-off meeting, held on May 5, 2017. She emphasized the importance of the project to the company, as it would ensure good returns by getting the new product to market before its competitors. She stressed that the delivery date must not be compromised in any way, as this would open the doors for competitive products and the opportunity would be missed. The project manager and the team were asked to get busy immediately with their planning, and a follow-up meeting was set for August 5, 2017 to review the project plans. Project Plan Development The project team had been involved in many similar projects in the past, and thus knew exactly what the project entailed. For this reason the plans were based on previous historical information of past projects. The project plans included only the systems-related work. The interfacing to other areas, such as the legal department, marketing, and operations, would be handled by the project manager at the specific time required for their input. Project plans were drawn up using a scheduling tool. The phases and tasks were detailed, but resources were not allocated to the tasks, since resources knew exactly what their role was on the project and which tasks related to them. Task dependencies were not put into the plan, as this made the plan too complex. Dependencies were handled by each team member and by the project manager. Project Plan Management Management of the project plan consisted of updating tasks with their percentage complete on a weekly basis. Record of actual hours spent on specific tasks was deemed not necessary. Each resource gave an estimate of the percentage complete for each task, which was used to update the plan. Resource availability was handled in an informal manner whereby each resource gave feedback on a weekly basis regarding his or her workload on the project and other non-project work responsibilities, such as systems maintenance. Progress Reporting Progress reports were produced every two weeks. These consisted of a progress summary, deliverables attained, percent complete, risks, issues, and cost information. (See the most recent Wellness Progress Report below.) Minutes were kept for some meetings. (See the most recent Meeting Minutes below.) Progress for Period May 5, 2017 – August 5, 2017 Initial progress was good, with all team members working well together. Programming started almost immediately, since the team knew the systems so well that they were able to make some of the required changes immediately. Some issues were identified with the user requirements, since not enough detail was in the requirements document. These issues were resolved between the programmers and the users. Some of the programmers experienced problems when they discovered they were working on the wrong version of the user requirements. This was resolved when the users printed out the current version of the requirements for all the team members to make sure they were all working on the current version. Progress was not as fast as desired, due mainly to users changing their minds about the requirements. The programmers were very accommodating with such changes and tried their utmost to keep the users satisfied. Unfortunately, the number of changes and additional requirements requested by the users caused the work to fall behind schedule. When some of the programmers complained to the project manager, he said that it was essential that users received what they wanted, so their changes must be accommodated, even if it meant having to work extra hours to catch up. The programming was also delayed from time to time due to technical problems experienced with the new development environment. The company did not have anyone experienced in the new development software, thus had to rely on vendor support, which was a bit lacking due to their commitments at other companies. Progress for Period August 5, 2017 – October 5, 2017 (two months before live date) The sponsor became concerned with the project progress, since she felt there was a risk of not meeting the required delivery date. The programmers were working long hours to try catch up on the project work, as well as doing their required maintenance and problem fixing of the live systems. The legal department said that they may not be able to provide the policy document wording in time for the live date, due to other priorities. They said they may have been able to if they had known about it sooner. The user department said they may have a problem getting the test packs ready for user testing, as some staff were going on leave over the Thanksgiving period. Initial testing revealed that the performance of some of the modules was very slow. This was resolved to some extent when it was found that some of the programmers had used inefficient coding, as they were new to the programming language being used. There were also a number of bugs reported, one of which causes the product to crash at least once a week. There are numerous change requests submitted by users for enhancements to the product. John, the project manager, has left, and the project team is in complete disarray, and there seem to be issues between the architect and database administrators on just how the database supports the vendor reports. As of now the two areas are not working together to develop solutions for the issues. There also seems to be a loss of a defined testing strategy, which has cropped concerns with development and user acceptance. There is no existing method of capturing reported issues, or how to handle changes. Management is unhappy about the project and there is no established communications method to inform them about the project status. The project is over budget by 20%. The vendor is asking for prepayment in order to deliver the third and final module for the final payment of $75,000, which was 75% of the total vendor cost. The module has not been tested yet. There is no communications plan, no risk plan, no systems implementation plan (to define how system implementation testing is handled), and no total cost of ownership (TCO) fee schedule. There is a conflict within the project team (e.g., team members have conflicting roles, or experience time pressure as a result of working in two positions within the organization simultaneously). Wellness Progress Report Client Project Project Manager 1 VP Operations Wellness Vendor John Current W1005 Development Start: End: Project Number Type of Project Reporting Period Progress Summary Programming work is almost complete and testing has begun. Unfortunately, it is going to take longer than planned to complete the programming due to changes requested by the users and errors made by the programmers using the new programming language. We are hoping that this time will be caught up by working overtime and reducing the testing time planned. 2 Major Activities Completed before Reporting Period Commenced 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Business case approved User requirements document completed Programming underway Unit testing underway Test pack compilation started 3 Major Activities during Reporting Period 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Programming continuing Unit testing underway Test packs complete Implementation plan started Changes made per user requests to date 4 Deliverables and Milestones No Description 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 Initial project plan Approved project charter Program code System testing User acceptance testing Go live Post implementation audit Project acceptance sign-off 5 Risks 5.1 Delivery date may be missed due to changes in user requirements Project team members may take leave over the Thanksgiving holidays Other departments may not have resources to do the policy docs and testing when required 5.2 5.3 Contingency Plan/Actions Baseline End Date Forecast or Actual End Date Actionee % Complete Status Impact (1-10) Probability (1-10) Score (I * P) Work overtime to catch up 8 5 40 JC Open Plan leave into project schedule 7 5 35 JC Open Agree tasks with other departments 8 6 48 JC Open 6 Issues 6.1 Changes to requirements requested by the users are causing delays in project delivery 9 JC Agree final requirements with the users 6.2 Currently behind schedule with some tasks, but should be able to catch up without affecting the scheduled delivery date 9 JC Work overtime 6.3 8 JC Agree date with Legal Dept. 6.4 Get final policy document wording from legal department Make sure Testers are available for required testing dates 8 JC Agree resources and dates for testing with user departments 7 List of Scope Change Requests No Impact (1-10) Date 7.1 Action Due Date/ Status Client Approval Description Impact No official change requests to date 8 Major Activities for Next Period 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 Complete programming Complete and get approval for project charter Start system testing Start planning for user acceptance test (compile test plan) Fix errors and omissions identified during testing Compile and agree implementation plan 8 Actionee Budget Tracking Task/Phase Wellness Vendor Planned Cost (Baseline) 441,650 Actual Cost to Date 230,892 Remaining Cost 210,758 Estimate at Completion 529,980 Percent Variance 20% Meeting Minutes MEETING DATE: May 15, 2017 PROJECT: SUBJECT: ATTENDEES: APOLOGIES: Wellness Vendor Weekly Progress Roy Kirk (RK), John Current (JC), Kevin Smith (KS), project team members Sue Barrett (Sponsor) Outstanding from Previous Meeting’s Minutes Item 1. Minute JC to discuss user requirements changes impact with sponsor Actionee Status / Due Date JC JC could not get meeting with sponsor Actionee Status / Due Date Meeting Minutes Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Minute Testing plan to be drawn up and testers allocated by the user department Leave schedule to be drawn up for all project staff to assess project schedule impact Legal department to give expected completion date for new policy document wording Machine needs to be booked and set up for training of testers and running of the user acceptance test Testers to be identified by user departments and allocated for testing period required Current problems with system performance of the Java code to be escalated to vendor for urgent resolution JC JC JC KS SB JC Scope Change Requests Item 1. Change request description No official scope change requests to date Next meeting: 02/04/2017 (3pm. – 4pm) - Meeting Room 2.3 Actionee Due Date Status Identified Problems and Solutions Item No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Problem Description Root Cause Proposed Resolution Action Proposed Preventative Action for Future Projects Item No. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Problem Description Root Cause Proposed Resolution Action Proposed Preventative Action for Future Projects Item No. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Problem Description Root Cause Proposed Resolution Action Proposed Preventative Action for Future Projects Wellness Vendor - Project Charter Project Name: Wellness Vendor Project Information Project Number W1005 IS Request Number RW1005 Request Date Request Name Business Area May 15, 2017 Wellness Vendor Information Technology (IT) Sr. VP Information Systems 54 Requester Business Unit Executive Sponsor VP Operations IT Sr. VP Information Systems VP Operations Project Owner Overall Score Business Area Approver Scope & Objectives Business Problem Addressed Request Vision & Scope Business Assumptions & Risks Timing & Dependencies Narrative Summary of Benefits Create modular software package to handle wellness vendor data to ensure appropriate preventative care is being tracked for members. Vendor wellness member tracking and management. Vendor data availability and format. Data analytics and reporting capabilities. Go-live date: Dec 21, 2017 Increase vendor revenue, decrease inappropriate utilization of care, and improve return on investment for wellness vendor programs. Business / Strategic Alignment Corporate Sustainability Administrative Efficiency Revenue Generating Customer Service or Experience Member Touchpoint Measures/Trends Request Expands Scope of Products & Services Request contributes to IHM’s Strategic Objectives How This Request Supports These Drivers Strategic Score 9 9 9 3 3 3 3 Increase in revenue 39 Wellness Vendor - Project Charter Risk / Compliance Fulfill a Corporate Requirement Address a Federal / State Mandate Address an Association Mandate Address a Customer Mandate How This Request Supports These Drivers Risk Score 15 0 0 0 Increase preventative care management and administrative cost internally. 15 Business Requirements 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Vendor sends daily data input file for report analytics. Send weekly vendor output analytics file (summarization of weekly activities). Vendor evaluates information for approval on correctness of data output. Additional files, upon request sent to/from vendor. Vendor I/S reporting (requires report prototypes). Constraints/Exclusions Project Exclusions Governing Agreements N/A Governmental regulations and guidelines, vendor contract language Organizational Impact Operations Call Center Product Management Information Technology Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Vendor wellness programs , I/S technical support, report & analytics Customer service IT support Wellness product management for modular software Wellness provider file layouts and reporting Data storage Wellness Vendor - Project Charter Risks Risk Area Vendor Performance Likelihood Risk Owner Description All governmental regulations and standards must be in compliance and maintained by vendor. All accreditation standard(s) must be in compliance and maintained for vendor. High Resources Resources Internal/External Estimated hours Role Description Identified in project plan Internal Refer to project plan
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Final Project
Student’s Name
Institution

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Final Project
I. Conflict Resolution plan
Team Dynamics
A leading health service organization known as Medical Informatics came up with a plan
to develop a new product. The plans to capture more data which will help in improving the
available knowledge in the clinic. Massive data helps in research and decision-making. The
organization needs to make a more extensive clinical data warehouse to ensure that data from
third-party health vendors is ingested in the warehouse (Georgiadis, 2015). The warehouse is
also expected to store data from the onsite clinic. Combining this information is expected to
downstream the workers' group analytics and produce the report about processes.
Team Structure
The person assigned to manage the new project of developing a new project is a project
manager in the clinic; the project manager will guide everybody who will be part of the project
on what and when. Other parts are part of this project; these include legal departments, operation
department, programmer, technician, contractor, networking designer, and knowledge
management personnel. The manager is aged 24 years, he has experience on projects for about
three years, and all the projects in the past were about new product development. The project
manager has enough experience, knowledge dealing with projects, installation of systems
portrays a good relationship between him and other coworkers. He is good at coordinating
activities between different departments in the clinic. The manager chose to work with his
previous team. It is easy to coordinate people with who he had worked; the project team has
enough experience in launching the project and leading its progress with minimal mistakes. At

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some point, the project manager leaves the sight due to some reasons. The development team
consists of a java programming development team that does not know MS-oriented languages.
There was a communication breakdown due to a misunderstanding between the database
administrator and the architect.
There were more requests from the users on upgrading the project, which made the
programmers fall back in time as these tasks needed more time for perfection than required. The
programmers expect to give the tasks more time to ensure the project does not stay behind
schedule. The management is discouraged by the failures coming in before the project ends; the
conflicts and being behind time have brought about time pressure, tasks accumulation, and
people having to do more than one task to ensure that all challenging tasks are finished in time.
Five Stage Team Development Model
The first stage of this model is forming; in the stage of forming, many team members are
orientated to the project; they are polite and have positivity toward project progress. It also
involves forming the right team which will fit in the activities found in the project. At this stage,
the members working on the project have expectations on how to manage tasks allocated to
them. They are anxious to complete the tasks and all activities given to them by the project
manager. The second stage is storming, where people start discussing what steps to take to work
successfully to the end of the project. At this stage, the team members are expected to have
disagreements as people get to know each other through interaction. The decisions made by the
people under control may also bring misunderstanding between them and the team on the site
(Leon & Laing, 2021). The third stage is the norming stage, where team members start
understanding each other better and looking for ways in which they can solve their conflicts.

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Each of the team members has to appreciate the strengths of each member and start combining
their abilities to make sure that the project runs smoothly.
At this stage, there is socialization between the team members and their leaders hence
improving the channels of communication in the whole group hence bringing more success into
the project. The fourth stage of the model is the performing stage, where team members are in
good condition and ready to work together to ensure all project objectives are achieved. Here the
groups support the structure and the processes of the project. The fifth and last stage is the
adjourning stage; at this stage, the team focuses on the project's development. Team members are
happy with the progress and are expected to connect with them to make it easy for them to
achieve their goals.
Cause of Conflict
The conflict in the project came as a result of programmers using different versions of
programming software and other team members using different materials than agreed. Another
source of conflict in the project is the lack of knowledge by the leaders or the project managers.
They lack the correct values to handle people of different kinds who are incorporated into the
team. Lack of experience in handling disagreements may bring about more conflicts in the
project, making it have delays in fulfilling some set goals (Yusuf & Pretorius, 2017). If the
project owners do not offer the right support, the manager may feel that the environment is not
conducive to working, hence conflicting with the clinic. There may emerge conflict between
members about tasks pressure and time to fining the given activities.
Skills of the Team

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The manager leaves the project at module two, which displays a sense of lack of skills.
The programmers also lack skills as they choose to use different programming software versions,
which delay programming the needed systems. There was also a lack of skills because the
architecture and the system administrator never knew how to integrate the new system.
Conflict Solving In Leadership
The first step the manager should take is guiding the employers to make sure that there is
no collision when dealing with the activities related to the project. The guiding stage involves
advising on how to carry out some activities and how to relate with other team members in the
right way. The manager is a role model and encourages the team members. The second step of
conflict resolving is coaching, which involves clearly defining the manager's role while seeking
ideas from the team members. During this stage, the leaders should express qualities such as
being a good listener, giving quality advice, and giving help to the workers to gain the required
skills to handle tasks in the project. Lastly is the structuring stage, where the project manager
should show that he appreciates the workers' efforts in making the right decision and working
hard towards achieving the project's goals. The managers should also appreciate the employees
to make them work harder and give quality services as needed.
Appropriate Skills
There are two types of skills in project management; these include hard and soft skills.
Hard skills are set to quantity. The sources of hard skills include books, classrooms, training, and
training materials. Being proficient in a foreign language, computer programming, degrees,
machine operation, and certification are hard skills. The manager will only know whether the
team member has hard skills by going through their resumes. Soft skills do not identify quality.

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Rather people can interact with others. These skills include work ethic, communication,
flexibility, time management, leadership, teamwork, and motivation. Through the way people
communicate and how they treat others, managers can identify people with soft skills. Being
observant when dealing with the member of the teams will give the manager a chance to know
whether an employee has soft skills.
Conflict Solving Strategy
Assertiveness is one of the strategies which can be used in conflict management. Having
good communication skills can help the project manager in resolving conflicts within short
periods. When someone has the quality of assertiveness, they tend to express themselves
confidently to others. The main value that brings about assertiveness includes listening,
communication, and understanding what others are saying to us. Accommodation is another
conflict-solving strategy that employs peace. Employees should use accommodation to solve
problems between them and maintain the bond between coworkers to ensure that they have a
combined effort to achieve goals. Avoidance involves delaying or ignoring a conflict for some
time. Avoidance gives the leaders enough time to research the cause of the conflict and let the
employers who cannot solve conflicts among themselves learn ways of doing so. Compromise is
a situation where some of the actions of the employers or leaders are agreed upon by the other
workers and leaders. This happens mostly in the project where people under conflict are of the
same level or have equal authority.
Confidence and Motivation
The selection of people to work together needs a skilled manager to ensure that all things
are done according to standards. Having people who are ready to work together and appreciate

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the efforts of others in the project will motivate the employees to work harder...


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I was having a hard time with this subject, and this was a great help.

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