emergency management 2 questions , management homework help

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Question Description

  1. List some of the logistic concerns a Disaster Planner would have to address as he/she develops an emergency operations plan for liberty county.

(source 1 &2) in the attachment

2. Think about a man-made event such as a bombing or shooter situation. Discuss the eight-step design process of the event you selected and apply it to a functional exercise. Use the steps to build the foundation for a functional exercise. This is the FEMA 8-step process:

1. Assess needs

2. Define Scope

3. Write Statement of Purpose

4. Define Objectives

5. Compose Narrative

6. Write major and detailed events

7. List expected actions

8. Prepare messages

(Source 3) in the attachment

Unite 10 for functional exercise

Unite 4 for Exercise Design Steps

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program Volume III: Exercise Evaluation and Improvement Planning Revised February 2007 This page is intentionally blank. HSEEP Volume III Preface Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Volume I was initially published in 2002 and provided an overview of the exercise design, development, conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning process as well as doctrine for U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) exercises. Subsequent volumes (II–IV) provided more detailed descriptions of the planning and evaluation process as well as sample exercise materials. Since the initial versions of the HSEEP volumes were published, the homeland security community has experienced numerous changes, including the building of a new and cohesive Federal agency and the release and adoption of the National Response Plan (NRP), National Incident Management System (NIMS), National Preparedness Goal, Universal Task List (UTL), and Target Capabilities List (TCL). This 2007 release of the HSEEP volumes represents an exercise policy and program reflective of these changes. The following changes have been made: The volumes have been made more user-friendly and concise. New policies have been incorporated (e.g., NIMS, NRP, National Preparedness Goal, UTL, TCL). References to DHS-specific doctrinal or grant-related requirements, such as the need for terrorism-related scenarios, have been eliminated. Comments from the Federal Interagency, as well as several State and local stakeholders, have been incorporated so the HSEEP Policy and Guidance is more applicable to all exercises, regardless of scope, scale, scenario, or sponsoring agency. The order of Volumes II and III has been reversed to follow the natural progression of exercise design, development, conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning. It is important to note that the fundamentals of the exercise design, development, planning, evaluation, and improvement planning methodologies have not changed with these volume revisions. Developing and implementing comprehensive exercise policies is a continually evolving process. As strategies, policies, and plans evolve, future revisions will be issued. Preface i This page is intentionally blank. HSEEP Volume III Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. i Introduction....................................................................................................................................v Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program................................................................v Purpose.....................................................................................................................................v Organization.............................................................................................................................v Security Guidance...................................................................................................................... vi Chapter 1: Evaluation and Improvement Planning Overview................................................. 1 Evaluation, Improvement Planning, and Capabilities-Based Planning ...................................... 1 Exercise Evaluation Methodology.............................................................................................. 1 Task-Level Analysis ............................................................................................................... 1 Activity-Level Analysis.......................................................................................................... 2 Capability-Level Analysis ...................................................................................................... 2 Exercise Evaluation Guides ........................................................................................................ 3 After Action Report / Improvement Plan.................................................................................... 5 Chapter 2: Exercise Evaluation, Data Collection, and Analysis (Steps 1–4)........................... 6 Step 1: Plan and Organize the Evaluation .................................................................................. 7 Appoint Lead Evaluator.......................................................................................................... 7 Develop Evaluation Requirements ......................................................................................... 7 Exercise Scope .................................................................................................................... 7 Exercise Objectives............................................................................................................. 7 Exercise Evaluation Team Organization and Structure...................................................... 8 Define Evaluation Requirements ............................................................................................ 9 Recruit, Assign, and Train Evaluators .................................................................................... 9 Recruiting Evaluators ......................................................................................................... 9 Assigning Evaluators .......................................................................................................... 9 Training Evaluators........................................................................................................... 10 Finalize Evaluation Plan ....................................................................................................... 10 Conduct Controller and Evaluator Briefing.......................................................................... 11 Step 2: Observe the Exercise and Collect Data ........................................................................ 11 Discussion-Based Exercises ................................................................................................. 11 Operations-Based Exercises ................................................................................................. 12 Conducting a Player Hot Wash......................................................................................... 14 Collecting Supplemental Data .......................................................................................... 14 Step 3: Analyze Data ................................................................................................................ 14 Identifying Root Cause and Developing Recommendations ................................................ 15 Discussion-Based Exercises ................................................................................................. 15 Controller and Evaluator Debrief ..................................................................................... 15 Draft AAR Content ........................................................................................................... 15 Operations-Based Exercises ................................................................................................. 16 Controller and Evaluator Debrief ..................................................................................... 16 Draft AAR Content ........................................................................................................... 16 Exercise Event Timeline ................................................................................................... 16 Contents iii HSEEP Volume III Step 4: Develop the Draft After Action Report / Improvement Plan ....................................... 17 Chapter 3: Improvement Planning (Steps 5–8) ....................................................................... 18 Step 5: Conduct After Action Conference and Refine Draft AAR........................................... 19 Step 6: Identify Corrective Actions to be Implemented ........................................................... 20 Step 7: Finalize AAR/IP ........................................................................................................... 21 Step 8: Track Implementation................................................................................................... 21 Event Points of Contact ........................................................................................................ 21 Participating Entity Points of Contact .................................................................................. 22 Action Officers...................................................................................................................... 22 Continual Improvement ........................................................................................................ 22 Appendix A: After Action Report / Improvement Plan Guidelines..................................... A-1 Appendix B: After Action Quick Look Report Guidelines................................................... B-1 Appendix C: Exercise Evaluation Guide Sample .................................................................. C-1 Appendix D: Development of Discussion-Based Evaluation Materials ............................... D-1 Appendix E: Acronyms ............................................................................................................ E-1 Figures and Tables Figure 1-1: Levels of criteria for analysis ...................................................................................... 3 Figure 1-2: EEG relationships........................................................................................................ 4 Figure 2-1: Data collection and analysis steps............................................................................... 6 Figure 2-2: Example exercise evaluation team organization ......................................................... 8 Figure 3-1: Improvement planning steps ...................................................................................... 19 Figure 3-2: Flow of observations.................................................................................................. 23 Table A-1: Example IP ............................................................................................................... A-7 Table A-2: Example Exercise Events Summary Table format.................................................... A-9 Table A-3: Descriptions of performance ratings........................................................................ A-9 Figure D-1: Developing scenario-specific, discussion-based materials .................................... D-2 Contents iv HSEEP Volume III Introduction Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program Following the domestic terrorist attacks in 1993, 1995, and 2001 and the establishment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2002, officials at all levels of government and in all types of communities have worked to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from a variety of threats to public safety. Exercises play a crucial role in preparedness, providing opportunities for emergency responders and officials to practice and assess their collective capabilities. Purpose The purpose of the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) is to provide common exercise policy and program guidance that constitutes a national standard for exercises. HSEEP includes consistent terminology that can be used by all exercise planners, regardless of the nature and composition of their sponsoring agency or organization. The volumes also provide tools to help exercise managers plan, conduct, and evaluate exercises to improve overall preparedness. HSEEP reflects lessons learned and best practices from existing exercise programs and can be adapted to the full spectrum of hazardous scenarios and incidents (e.g., natural disasters, terrorism, technological disasters). The HSEEP reference volumes integrate language and concepts from the National Response Plan (NRP), the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the National Preparedness Goal, the Universal Task List (UTL), the Target Capabilities List (TCL), existing exercise programs, and prevention and response protocols from all levels of government. In accordance with NIMS, all efforts should be made to ensure consistent use of the terminology and processes described in HSEEP. Organization This document is the third of five HSEEP volumes, all of which are available at the HSEEP website (http://hseep.dhs.gov). The volumes are organized as follows: HSEEP Volume I: HSEEP Overview and Exercise Program Management provides guidance for building and maintaining an effective exercise program and summarizes the planning and evaluation process described in further detail in Volumes II through V. HSEEP Volume II: Exercise Planning and Conduct helps planners outline a standardized foundation, design, development, and conduct process adaptable to any type of exercise. HSEEP Volume III: Exercise Evaluation and Improvement Planning offers proven methodology for evaluating and documenting exercises and implementing an Improvement Plan (IP). HSEEP Volume IV: Sample Exercise Documents and Formats provides sample exercise materials referenced in HSEEP Volumes I, II, III, and V. Readers with Internet connectivity may click on exercise materials referenced in this volume to link to HSEEP Volume IV. HSEEP Volume V: Prevention Exercises (Draft) contains guidance consistent with the HSEEP model to assist entities in designing and evaluating exercises that validate preincident capabilities such as intelligence analysis and information sharing. This volume, HSEEP Volume III: Exercise Evaluation and Improvement Planning, which provides guidance for exercise evaluation and improvement planning, is organized as follows: Chapter 1: Introduction Evaluation and Improvement Planning Overview v HSEEP Volume III Chapter 2: Exercise Evaluation, Data Collection, and Analysis (Steps 1–4) Chapter 3: Improvement Planning (Steps 5–8) Appendix A: After Action Report / Improvement Plan Guidelines Appendix B: After Action Report Quick Look Report Guidelines Appendix C: Exercise Evaluation Guides Appendix D: Discussion-Based EEG Development Guidance Appendix E: Acronyms Security Guidance While most of the content found in HSEEP is not sensitive or classified, some HSEEP materials (e.g., scenario examples), particularly those in Volume IV, may necessitate restrictions on distribution. Exercise materials that are produced in accordance with HSEEP guidance and are deemed sensitive should be designated as For Official Use Only (FOUO). FOUO identifies unclassified information of a sensitive nature, not otherwise categorized by statute or regulations, of which the unauthorized disclosure could adversely impact a person’s privacy or welfare, the conduct of Federal programs, or programs or operations essential to national interest. Examples of materials that may require FOUO designation include scenario information, the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), and the After Action Report / Improvement Plan (AAR/IP). Access to FOUO information is on a need-to-know basis. FOUO information may be shared with other agencies; Federal, State, local, or tribal government; appropriate private sector representatives; and law enforcement officials, provided a specific need-to-know has been established and the information is shared in furtherance of a coordinated and official governmental activity. Certain exercise-related information from private sector partners may require or be eligible for additional protections under the Protective Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program. Established pursuant to the Critical Infrastructure Information (CII) Act of 2002, the PCII Program is an information-protection tool that enables members of the private sector to submit proprietary, confidential, or sensitive infrastructure information to DHS with the assurance that the information will be protected from public disclosure. Under the PCII Program, information that satisfies the requirements of the CII Act of 2002 is protected from public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), State and local disclosure laws, and use in civil litigation. DHS and other Federal, State, and local analysts use PCII in pursuit of a more secure homeland, focusing primarily on analyzing and securing critical infrastructure and protected systems, identifying vulnerabilities and developing risk assessments, and enhancing recovery preparedness measures. Introduction vi This page is intentionally blank. HSEEP Volume III Chapter 1: Evaluation and Improvement Planning Overview Exercise evaluation maintains a fundamental link to improvement planning because it assesses an entity’s performance in an exercise and identifies strengths and areas for improvement. Following exercise conduct, improvement planning leverages the outputs of the evaluation process by developing Improvement Plans (IPs), which assign responsibility for correcting deficiencies or shortcomings observed during a given exercise. Through this process, evaluation identifies improvement opportunities, and improvement planning provides a disciplined process for implementing corrective actions. Evaluation, Improvement Planning, and Capabilities-Based Planning In accordance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8 (HSPD-8), the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) has adopted a capabilities-based planning approach, which is a process intended to build capabilities suitable for responding to a wide range of threats and hazards. Capabilities-based planning emphasizes the need to analyze a diverse array of realistic scenarios and identify corresponding capabilities necessary for effective prevention, protection, response, and recovery efforts. Capabilities-based planning is the basis for guidance such as the National Preparedness Goal, the Target Capabilities List (TCL), and the Universal Task List (UTL). The TCL and UTL drive the application of capabilities-based planning by identifying 37 capabilities that will prepare the Nation for terrorism, natural disasters, and other emergencies. Exercise evaluation and improvement planning play an important role in the capabilities-based planning process by assessing an entity’s capabilities (based on exercise objectives) and developing IPs that enhance those capabilities. Exercise Evaluation Guides (EEGs) provide standards for assessing objectives through the execution of tasks and activities linked to each target capability. Based on areas for improvement identified using the EEGs, After Action Reports / Improvement Plans (AARs/IPs) provide concrete steps that an entity can take to remedy deficiencies or shortcomings observed during exercises. Exercises are also an opportunity to identify lessons learned and best practices that can be shared with other jurisdictions and organizations to help build the Nation’s overall preparedness. Exercise Evaluation Methodology The HSEEP evaluation methodology is an analytical process used to assess the demonstration of capabilities during exercises. According to this methodology, exercise evaluation incorporates three distinct levels of analysis: task-level analysis, activity-level analysis, and capability-level analysis. Task-Level Analysis Tasks are specific, discrete actions that individuals or groups must successfully perform or address during Chapter 1: Evaluation and Improvement Planning Overview 1 HSEEP Volume III operations-based and discussion-based exercises. Task-level analysis assists representatives of exercising entities in analyzing shortcomings or strengths related to these individual actions. This analysis can also help entities target plans, equipment, and training resources ...
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School: Duke University

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Running Head: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Emergency Management
Name
Instructor
Institutional Affiliation
Date

1

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

2

1. List some of the logistic concerns a Disaster Planner would have to address as he/she
develops an emergency operations plan for liberty county.

The emergency operations plan entails an inclusive emergency management program that
develops a methodical, synchronized, and effective delivery of emergency services to mitigate
and respond to the effects of emergency and minimize damage. The disaster planner for Liberty
County is responsible for developing an emergency operations plan to respond to emergencies in
case a disaster occurs. The following are some of the concerns that must be addressed when
developing an emergency operations plan;
1. Key stakeholders
When developing an emergency operations plan, the disaster planner should highlight the
key stakeholders who would play different roles during an emergency. These people are typically
in charge during an emergency and provide direction at the same time control the whole
emergency operations. The disaster planner should list all the personnel as well as their
respective duties and responsibilities.
2. Communicati...

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