Wilkes Develop Project Performance Monitoring and Control Procedures Questions

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Chapter 10 Monitoring and Information Systems What have we done so far …. ◼ ◼ 10- 2 Completed Chapter 1, 2, 6, 7, 3, 5, 4, 8 & 9 Submitted project related assignments Chapter Learning Outcomes (Note: We started this chapter last week. We will continue working on this chapter this week) If you complete the given assignments for this chapter you will: ◼ ◼ 10- 3 Understand Earned Value Analysis in detail Understand Project Management Information Systems A circular cycle Develop a Plan Monitor how well the project is performing compared to the plan Control Determine changes needed to meet project goals 10- 4 The Plan consists of Project Scope (performance), Schedule and Budget ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ 10- 5 Scope, schedule and cost are the typical items which are calculated (Plan) Actual data describing the project performance, schedule and budget are compared to the plan (Monitor) The Project Manager takes corrective action to bring the system back into conformance with the plan (Control) (Or develops a revised plan) We start with a project plan ◼ ◼ ◼ Building the Baseline Planned Value (PV) curve The PV-curve is a graphical representation of the planned project expenses over time. The Planned Value represents the cumulative cost over the planned schedule 10- 6 You start with a resource spending table for each work package or task Total Cost Cost/Wk Activity $ 1,140 228 A $ 4,370 4370 B $ 2,538 845.8667 C $ 21,080 5270 D $ 5,283 880.5333 E $ 2,052 256.5 F $ 3,352 1675.8 G $ 5,344 5344 H $ 2,052 410.4 I $ 3,648 1216 J $ 4,601 2300.4 K $ 1,368 342 L $ 56,827 10- 7 1 228 2 228 3 228 4 228 5 228 6 7 8 9 Week 10 11 12 13 5270 5270 5270 14 15 16 17 18 19 4370 846 846 846 5270 881 257 257 257 257 257 257 257 881 881 881 881 881 257 1676 1676 5344 410 410 410 410 410 1216 2300 1216 1216 2300 342 342 342 342 Wkly Total 7,872 2,785 1,237 1,237 1,237 5,379 1,513 2,318 2,318 8,162 6,946 5,270 5,270 881 881 881 881 881 881 Cum Total 7,872 10,657 11,894 13,131 14,368 19,747 21,260 23,578 25,896 34,058 41,004 46,274 51,544 52,425 53,305 54,186 55,066 55,947 56,827 Graphically we can reduce this plan to a curve of “Planned Value” or PV The Planned Value (PV) 10- 8 The PV curve represents the cumulative expenses planned for the project Total Cost $ 1,140 $ 4,370 $ 2,538 $ 21,080 $ 5,283 $ 2,052 $ 3,352 $ 5,344 $ 2,052 $ 3,648 $ 4,601 $ 1,368 $ 56,827 Cost/Wk 228 4370 845.8667 5270 880.5333 256.5 1675.8 5344 410.4 1216 2300.4 342 Activity A B C D E F G H I J K L 1 228 2 228 3 228 4 228 5 228 6 7 8 9 Week 10 11 12 13 5270 5270 5270 14 15 16 17 18 19 4370 846 846 846 5270 881 257 257 257 257 257 257 410 410 410 410 410 257 881 881 881 881 881 257 1676 1676 5344 1216 2300 Wkly Total 7,872 Cum Total 7,872 1216 1216 2300 342 2,785 10,657 1,237 11,894 We plan to spend a total of $19,747 by the end of the sixth month. 342 1,237 13,131 342 1,237 14,368 342 5,379 19,747 1,513 21,260 2,318 23,578 2,318 25,896 8,162 34,058 6,946 41,004 5,270 46,274 5,270 51,544 881 52,425 881 53,305 881 54,186 881 55,066 881 55,947 881 56,827 When project execution starts we have to plot two other curves; Actual Costs (AC) and Earned Values (EV) 1010 Actual Costs Activity Duration Total Cost Cost/Wk Activity A 5 $ 1,140 228 A B 1 $ 4,370 4370 B C 3 $ 2,538 845.8667 C D 4 $ 21,080 5270 D E 6 $ 5,283 880.5333 E F 8 $ 2,052 256.5 F G 2 $ 3,352 1675.8 G H 1 $ 5,344 5344 H I 5 $ 2,052 410.4 I J 3 $ 3,648 1216 J K 2 $ 4,601 2300.4 K L 4 $ 1,368 342 L $ 56,827 1 228 2 228 Week 3 4 228 228 5 228 6 Actual Cost 7 1000 4370 4000 846 0 0 0 257 257 257 257 257 257 600 0 4500 5344 410 410 410 410 1000 410 0 2300 4500 2300 342 342 342 1400 342 Wkly Total 7,872 2,785 1,237 1,237 1,237 5,379 1,513 Plan Value 7,872 10,657 11,894 13,131 14,368 19,747 21,260 $17,000 total for Week 7 AC derived from Cost Accounting reports. Typically cumulative costs per task are summed for the project. 10- 11 AC (Actual Cost) comes from accounting records Actual Cost 1000 4000 0 0 0 600 0 4500 1000 0 4500 1400 $17,000 total for Week 7 10- 12 Earned Value Activity Duration Total Cost Cost/Wk Activity A 5 $ 1,140 228 A B 1 $ 4,370 4370 B C 3 $ 2,538 845.8667 C D 4 $ 21,080 5270 D E 6 $ 5,283 880.5333 E F 8 $ 2,052 256.5 F G 2 $ 3,352 1675.8 G H 1 $ 5,344 5344 H I 5 $ 2,052 410.4 I J 3 $ 3,648 1216 J K 2 $ 4,601 2300.4 K L 4 $ 1,368 342 L $ 56,827 1 228 2 228 Week 3 4 228 228 6 7 4370 846 257 257 257 257 257 257 5344 410 2300 410 410 410 410 2300 342 342 342 342 Wkly Total 7,872 2,785 1,237 1,237 1,237 5,379 1,513 Plan Value 7,872 10,657 11,894 13,131 14,368 19,747 21,260 Earned value for an activity is calculated as the % of an activity completed * its total cost 10- 13 5 228 Reported Percent Complete Earned Value 90 90%*1140 = 1026 100 4370 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 2052 0 0 100 5344 40 821 0 0 100 4601 100 1368 $19,582 Total EV for the Project EV (Earned Value) is computed based on reported measure of work completion Reported Percent Complete Earned Value 90 1026 100 4370 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 2052 0 0 100 5344 40 821 0 0 100 4601 100 1368 $19,582 Total EV for the Project 10- 14 To recap the source of information for the 3 curves PV, AC, and EV ◼ PV or Planned Value: (Budgeted Cost of Work Scheduled) ❑ Falls out of the cost estimate and the schedule ❑ Each work package has a schedule and a cost at the planning stage ❑ This is the reason you “load” the schedule 10- 15 Source of information for PV, AC, and EV ◼ AC or Actual Cost: (Actual Cost of Work Performed) ❑ The actual cost is tracked via accounting system ❑ It is how much you have spent for whatever has been accomplished to date 10- 16 Source of information for PV, AC, and EV ◼ EV or Earned Value: (Budgeted Cost of Work Performed) ❑ The budget is given for the entire task ❑ A percent complete estimate provided by the project staff can be used to transform the budget to earned value ❑ EV = (% complete) x (Planned Value) 10- 17 Plotting EV and AC with the PV curve helps visualize project performance over time Planned Value (PV) Total Project Cost Project Cost Actual Cost (AC) Earned Value (EV) Project Completion Calendar Time Project Start t1 10- 18 Are there any variances between the Planned cost and the actual one ? Cost Variance ❑ ❑ 1019 The difference between the “Earned Value” (EV) or budgeted cost of the work performed during a calendar period and the “Actual Cost” (AC) or actual cost of the work performed during that same period CV=EV-AC Are there any variances between the Planned schedule and the actual one ? Schedule Variance ❑ ❑ 1020 The difference between the “Earned Value” (EV) or budgeted cost of the work performed and the “Planned Value” (PV) or budgeted cost of the work scheduled (same calendar period) SV=EV-PV In both cost and schedule variances, cost is the measure ◼ ◼ Negative numbers mean we are behind plan Percentage variances may be more meaningful ❑ ❑ 1021 Cost Performance Index (CPI)=EV/AC Schedule Performance Index (SPI)=EV/PV The cost variance is the difference between the AC and the EV (Would like to keep the black line below the gold line) CV=EV-AC SV=EV-PV Total Project Cost AC Cost Variance Project Cost EV Project Completion Calendar Time Project Start t1 10- 22 The schedule variance is the difference between the EV and the PV (Would like to keep the gold line above the red line) CV=EV-AC SV=EV-PV PV Total Project Cost Project Cost AC EV Schedule Var. Project Completion Calendar Time t1 10- 23 Compare the Earned Value to the Planned Value along the time axis ◼ ◼ ◼ 10- 24 Shows that we planned to have this amount of work done 10 days ago. We are behind 10 Days The Time Variance What the PM does after the 3 curves showing some variances is important ◼ Principles: ❑ Keep the reports accurate and up to date ❑ Share the information with the entire team and the organization management ❑ Generally share with the customer too (but do so in a positive light) ◼ Possible actions (The Control Step) ❑ Meet and discuss ❑ Resource reallocation ❑ Resource expansion or contraction ❑ Performance modification 10- 25 Other project monitoring tools and techniques ◼ Progress reports ❑ ❑ ❑ Routine (monthly) reports Exception reports Special analysis reports ◼ Progress Meetings ◼ Stop light charts 10- 26 Exception reports ◼ ◼ ◼ Triggered when a project becomes “out of control” Will typically bring the project team and the general managers together to search for a solution Elevates the project management decision making to a higher level in the organization 10- 27 Special Analysis Reports ◼ ◼ ◼ Used to distribute the results of special studies conducted as a part of the project Focus on special problems Can effectively “re-plan” the project 10- 28 Meetings ◼ ◼ Most often, reports are delivered in face-toface meetings, and in telephone conference calls Some simple rules can lead to more productive meetings: ❑ ❑ ❑ Use meetings for making group decisions Have preset starting and stopping times Make sure that homework is done prior to the meeting 10- 29 More simple rules for meetings ◼ Avoid attributing remarks or viewpoints to individuals in the meeting minutes ◼ Avoid overly formal rules of procedure ◼ If a serious problem or crisis arises, call a meeting for the purpose of dealing with that issue only 10- 30 Stop light charts ◼ Project performance, schedule and budget are three important indicators of how well a project is progressing ◼ Other performance indicators may allow tracking ❑ Contractual status ❑ Client satisfaction ❑ Overall quality of the work ❑ Other 10- 31 Multiple project environments may use stop light charts to display snapshot status Month 1 2 3 4 ◼ Performance ◼ Schedule ◼ Budget ◼ Contract/Admin ◼ Client Satisfaction ◼ Quality 10- 32 Chapter Summary ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ Earned Value is the value of the work performed expressed in terms of the approved budget for an activity With both Actual Costs and Earned Value we can see where we are on the project Organizations who depend on project execution, develop Project Management Information Systems Project Mangers should invest time in assuring that the information in their system is accurate 10- 33 Chapter 11 Project Control Chapter Learning Outcomes If you complete the given assignments for this chapter you will: ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ Understand the use of Monitoring and Control Understand Controlling challenges Understand risks and it’s seriousness Learn the importance of a Risk Management Plan Understand Risk identification, its sources and its variance across the project lifecycle. Learn the role of mitigation strategy. 11- 2 Project Control ◼ ◼ Control is the last element in the implementation cycle of planning-monitoringcontrolling Control is focused on three elements of a project ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 3 Performance Cost Time Controlling Performance ◼ There are several things that can cause a project’s performance to require control: ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 4 Unexpected technical problems arise Insufficient resources when needed Challenging technical difficulties are present Quality or reliability problems occur Client requires changes in specifications Inter-functional complications arise Technological breakthroughs affect the project Controlling Cost ◼ There are several things that can cause a project’s cost to require control: ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 5 Technical difficulties require more resources The scope of the work increase Initial bids were too low Reporting was poor or untimely Budgeting was inaccurate Corrective control was not exercised in time Input price changes occurred Controlling Time ◼ 11- 6 There are several things that can cause a project’s schedule to require control: ❑ Technical difficulties took longer than planned to resolve ❑ Initial time estimates were optimistic ❑ Task sequencing was incorrect ❑ Required inputs of material, personnel or equipment were unavailable when needed ❑ Necessary preceding tasks were incomplete ❑ Customer generated change orders required rework Purposes of Control ◼ There are two fundamental objectives of control: ❑ ❑ 1. Get the project completed 2. Get it done efficiently (The supervision of organizational assets) ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ Physical Assets Human Assets Financial Assets To succeed the PM must “get it done” and do so efficiently 11- 7 Physical Asset Control / Supervision ◼ Requires control of the use of physical assets ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 8 Concerned with asset maintenance, whether preventive or corrective Also the timing of maintenance or replacement as well as the quality of maintenance Setting up maintenance schedules in such a way as to keep the equipment in operating condition while minimizing interference to ongoing work Physical inventory whether equipment or material must also be controlled Human Resource Control / Supervision ◼ ◼ ◼ 11- 9 Supervision of human resources requires controlling and maintaining the growth and development of people Projects provide fertile ground for cultivating people Because projects are unique, it is possible for people working on projects to gain a wide range of experience in a reasonably short period of time Financial Resource Control ◼ Exercise the techniques of financial control such as project budget, investment and assets control through a series of analyses and audits conducted by the accounting function ◼ The parent organization is responsible for the conservation and proper use of resources owned by the client or charged to the client 11- 10 Decisions regarding Control Processes ◼ Decisions must be made concerning: ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 11 At what points in the project will control be applied? What is to be controlled? How it will be measured? How much deviation will be tolerated? How to spot and correct potential deviations before they occur? Three Types of Control Processes ◼ 11- 12 There are three basic types of control mechanisms that can be used: ❑ Go/no-go control ❑ Post control ❑ Systems engineering brings you steering control (“cybernetic”) Go/No-go Controls ◼ Take the form of testing to see if some specific precondition has been met ❑ ❑ ❑ ◼ Are we done? Do we move forward? Have we solved this sub problem? Used daily by project managers and their assistants to guide the work 11- 13 Information Requirements for Go/no-go Controls ◼ The project proposal, plans specifications, schedules and budgets contain all the information needed to apply go/no-go controls to the project ◼ Milestones are the key events that serve as a focus for ongoing control activity ◼ These milestones are the project’s deliverables in the form of in-process output or final output 11- 14 Post-control ◼ Post-controls are applied after the fact ◼ Directed toward improving the chances for future projects to meet their goals ◼ Applied through formal document that contains: ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 15 The project objectives Milestones, checkpoints, and budgets The final report on project Recommendations for performance and process improvement Steering Control ◼ The variances on the S curve require redirection ◼ Behind schedule ❑ ◼ Add resources Over budget ❑ 11- 16 Reallocate dollars Characteristics of a Control System ◼ 11- 17 A good control system: ❑ Should be flexible ❑ Should be cost effective ❑ Must be truly useful ❑ Must satisfy the real needs of the project ❑ Must operate in a timely manner ❑ Sensors and monitors should be sufficiently accurate and precise to control the project within the limits that are reasonable for the client and parent organization Characteristics of a Control System ◼ A good control system (cont.): ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Should be as simple as possible Should be easy to maintain Should be capable of being extended or otherwise altered Should be fully documented when installed ◼ 11- 18 the documentation should include a complete training program in system operation Control Systems ◼ ◼ All control systems use feedback as a control process The control of performance, cost, and time usually require different input data: ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 19 Performance - engineering change notices, test results, quality checks, rework tickets, scrap rates Cost - budgets to actual cash flows, purchase orders, income reports, labor hour charges, accounting variance reports Schedule - benchmark reports, status reports, PERT/CPM networks, earned value graphs, Gantt charts, WBS, and action plans Control Tools ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ 11- 20 Some of the most important tools available for the project manager to use in controlling the project are variance analysis and trend projection A budget plan or expected growth curve of time or cost for a certain task is plotted Actual values are plotted as a dashed line as the work is actually finished At each point in time a new projection from the actual data is used to forecast what will occur in the future The variances are shown on the S curve each period Total Project Cost AC Cost Variance Project Cost EV Project Completion Calendar Time Project Start t1 11- 21 Trend Projections show what may happen if control is not exercised 11- 22 Control as a Function of Management ◼ ◼ 11- 23 The purpose of controlling is always the same: to bring the actual schedule, budget, and deliverables of the project into reasonably close equivalence with the planned schedule, budget, and deliverables The job of the project manager is to set controls that will encourage those behaviors that are deemed desirable and discourage those that are not Post-controls ◼ ◼ ◼ 11- 24 Post-controls are seen as much the same as a report card They may serve as the basis for reward or punishment, but they are received too late to change current performance However Post-control reports or study can be used to make organizational system-wide improvements What is this thing called Risk? ◼ ◼ Risk is a measure (or the probability and consequence) of not achieving a defined project goal This definition has two components ❑ ❑ ◼ Risk can be good or bad (Consequences + or -) ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 25 The probability of the event The consequence or impact of the event Upside risks Downside risks We’ll mainly focus on downside risks Risks can apply to any of the three components of the project management goal triangle Performance ◼ ◼ ◼ 11- 26 Schedule Risk Budget Risk Performance (Scope) Risk Project Managers can manage risk the same as they manage Schedule, Budget and Performance ◼ Risk Management entails: ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 27 Risk planning Risk assessment Risk handling or Mitigation Risk monitoring and Control Risk Planning ◼ ◼ ◼ During the project planning phase we develop and document scope, schedule and budget plans At this time we also must explicitly devise a game plan for dealing with Risk A risk management plan moves the Project Manager from a reactive to proactive manager of risk 11- 28 The Risk Management Plan ◼ A document that outlines the strategy for managing risk throughout the project life cycle ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 11- 29 Goals and objectives of Risk management Responsibilities assignment / additional expertise needed Processes for : ◼ Risk assessment ◼ Mitigation options ◼ Monitoring Risk management communication standards Risk Assessment means defining the Risk Probability, Impact and Expected Risk ◼ ◼ 11- 30 The probability is usually the likelihood that something will go wrong which will threaten the success of the project The impact is the dollar, schedule or performance consequences of that bad event Risk Probabilities and Impacts come in pairs ◼ Probabilities ❑ 50% chance of rain tomorrow ❑ 8% chance that a key team member will quit in the middle of the project ❑ 25% chance that the product component cannot meet reliability tolerances 11- 31 ◼ Impacts ❑ We pay the crew to sit in the truck ❑ Lose two weeks to retrain ❑ Customer may be disappointed or we are out of spec compliance The Expected Risk is the product of the probability and the impact ◼ ◼ ◼ Risk = .50 (50% chance) x $Cost of a crew day ($) Risk = .08 x Days to retrain new project member (days) Risk = .25 x the “value” of customer dissatisfaction or non compliance (?) In statistical terms we are computing the “expected value” of the risk 11- 32 Probability Zones of Risk depend on probabilities and impacts High Risk Low Risk Moderate Risk Impact 11- 33 Risk Assessment in practice ID % Prob Risk Impact Expected Risk 1 The budget for QA HW/SW is underestimated by 770 hrs $ 30% $66,882 $20,646 2 Prelim manufact. analysis reveals PCB component no longer avail $ 85% $125,000 $106,250 3 Customer still not Identified a communication system, delay to task. d 60% 30 days 18 days Totals 11- 34 $126,896 18 days The sum of the expected risks dictate creating some reserves of time and budgeted dollars ◼ Identification and assessment of risks adds to the complexity of project control processes ◼ The regular comparison of actual against plan should be expanded to be actual + known risks vs. plan ◼ Defining contingency funds and contingency schedule time during the planning phase and drawing down on them based on risk management is one way of handling it. 11- 35 Risk handling entails developing some mitigation strategy for reducing the probability or impact of the risk ID Risk Mitigation 1 The budget for QA HW/SW is underestimated by 770 hrs QA aware and developing alternative plan. Reevaluate exposure in June. 2 Prelim manufact. analysis reveals PCB component no longer avail Similar issue in Shanghai forced redesign of FSK system. Adapt redesign to project. ($25k cost) 3 Customer still not Identified communication System. Delay to task Comm system discussion expected 7/24. Prepare to discuss delay claim as a result. 11- 36 There are business risks and insurable risks ◼ ◼ Business risks provide opportunities for profit and loss (most of what we have discussed today) Insurable risks refer to opportunities for loss for which some insurance company can provide the mitigation strategy ❑ 11- 37 We purchase insurance to cover the project risk Risk Monitoring is part of the regular project monitoring process ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ 11- 38 Risk management status report is one part of regular (weekly, monthly, quarterly) review process Reports status and changes to estimates of probability, impact and expected value of the risk. Reports status of mitigation process (Plan, Cost, Schedule) Projects with higher total risks (or rapidly increasing risks) may dictate elevating the review rigor and management visibility Summary of Monitoring and Control ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ Monitoring and Control is directed to performance, cost, and time The S curve is useful for monitoring and controlling The two fundamental purposes of control are to regulate results through altering activity and to conserve the organization’s physical, human, and financial assets Control is used to make go/no-go decisions, to steer the project and to improve the project management process 11- 39 Summary of Risk Management for projects ◼ ◼ ◼ ◼ Virtually all projects have risks that threaten successful completion The gravity of the risk depends on the probability of it occurring and the impact if it does occur Risk Management Plan describes the organization’s strategy for managing risk Regular monitoring of the project or program risk improves the likelihood of project success 11- 40 SOLAR STREET LED LIGHT SYSTEMS I. Project Introduction and Overview The big problem today the pollution from the power plant which use the heavy fuel which cause the pollution and change the environment for this reason the world thinking seriously to find another source for the power. some of these goes with solar power and others go with wind and ocean waves etc. if we can do fast search on the internet, we can discover that the of solar lights has spread within the past 5 years due to rising green innovations and rising vitality road light. Among this move in moving towards more renewable vitality sources for lighting, a critical address is being raised: how much do sun oriented road lights cost compared to conventional road lighting? Today we have project to change the street light poles for the university from the electrical power to the solar power our targets for this project are to go green power also, we saved money with easy calculation we found the streetlight (LED) need 1.2 KWh per day (12 hour*100 watt) =1200-watt hour=1.2 KWH Number of streetlights 01 Hourly Cost of Daily (12 Electricity in hours) kWh ($) Monthly (30 days) Yearly (365 days) in kWh ($) in kWh ($) 0.10 3.6 43.8 0.12 The above cost without the other cost like maintenance and changing light which is cost around 40-45 USD per year for each street light Pole and this cost included (Cost of Replacement Bulbs + Truck Rental + Rental of Man Lift + Salary of At Least 2 Workers). If we assume we have 1000 street light pole in the university campus it means, we need 4,272,00 KW/ year(4.272Mwatt), Regarding this amount of power, CO2 emissions around 4 million metric ton we added to this world per year if the power plant used the petroleum which produce the minimum co2 emissions The solar streetlight consists 1- Solar panel: the solar panel generated electricity in DC form and there are two types (Poly-crystalline Solar Panel, Mono-crystalline Solar Panel) 2-Battery: are used to store the electricity generated by the solar panel. During the day and there are many types of these battery 3-LED lamp 4- Charge controller II. Project Goals and Objectives Our project has two goals 1- Go with green power and avoid world from more pollution commitment to environmental sustainability. 2- Save money and used this money for decrease the student charges plus to encourage other universities to do same things 3- This project is starting for big project to change all building of at the university campus to solar power. III. Detailed Scope of solar streetlights Our Project to change the streetlights without change the poles it means no need to buy new poles and excluded the civil work for bases. Also, we keep electrical connection with the new LED light by (automatic change over devise). we do that to make sure we have light on the night to avoid risk if there are more 4 days continuously raining (not enough sunshine). Now our scope of work is 1- Survey Check how many poles we have and each location and pointed on the map 2- -Design and collect offer Design the solar Led streetlights then we collects offers from the companies and choose the best offer after negotiated about (specification, quality, price, delivery, warranty) after choosing best company purchase of the goods The major component for streetlights No Part name Spec. QTY/PCS A SOLAR panel life 25 year 1000 B BATTERY life 5-8 year 1000 C BATTERY BOX D CHARGE CONTROLLER E ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT & CONNECTING WIRES F LED LAMP 50000 hours 1000 G Electric change over 5-10 years life 1000 H Light sensor 5-10 years life 1000 1000 DC 24 5A 1000 Lot 3-Prepare temporary storage room for the goods We can use the original storage room at the university 4-Install the streets lights A-removed the old streetlights B-connection the sensor light and electric change over C- install the solar LED streetlights 4-Inspection and commissioning Test all the LED streetlights through third party for specification IV. Work Breakdown Structure (Solar Led streetlights for the university) Solar streetlights 1-Site survey 2-Design and purchasing 3-Component installation 4-Test department 3.1 Installation of solar panels 4.1 Inspection 2-1. design of components 2-2Labor requirement 2-3 purchasing 3.2 Installation of batteries and light sensor 3.3Installation of charge controller with changeover 3.2.3 integration the solar panels to the company power system 4.2 Commissioning The cost for this project divided on two parts 1- The equipment for this project Item specification Price /$ QTY /PCS Total price/$ 1 Solar Panel 100Wp 80 1000 80,000 2 Battery 12V 120Ah 30 1000 30,000 Life 25 years 5~8 years 3 Controller DC24V 10 1000 10,000 4 Change over electronic 20 1000 20,000 5 LED Lamp DC24V 30W on ground brightness 25lux 1000 50,000hours 6 Cable 2.5mm2×1 special for solar 5 Total price CIF university store Delivery time 1000 5000 145,000 10-30days 2-Installation We have two Plans to make installation We planning to deal with specialist installation company by following term 1-we need ten technician work eight Hours per day each hour install one streetlight . {8(hours)*10(technician)*1(streetlights)=80 streetlight per day} We need 13 working days to install all streetlight Price for each solar LED streetlights (75 $ per pole) Total price for installation is 75,000 Total price will be 250,000 USD with 3-Inspection from third party Totally cost around 30,000 USD Total price for the project will be Equipment CIF university store$ Installation$ Inspection $ Total price $ 145,000 75,000 30,000 250,000 Total price is two hundred fifty thousand USD And the total Time to finished this project with two months (30 days shipment+15 days installation +15 days testing) A solar streetlight requires a solar panel, lightning fixture, a rechargeable battery and a pole, sensors, integrated or split LED’s. solar streetlights are lights on a pole mounted by the solar panel. • A solar panel is required to convert the solar energy(sunlight) into electricity. Lightning fixture refers to the bulbs. In case of the solar canopy lightning, the primary source is the LED’s. a rechargeable battery is required as the solar energy absorbed during the day is stored in the battery. The next requirement is the pole. It helps in holding the solar arrangement on the site. The solar cells in the panel seize the energy absorbed throughout the day and then it is converted to electrical energy and then stored in the battery. once the sun starts to set the voltage drops down and thus the light turns on. LEDs are used more commonly because of few of its properties like consuming less energy compared to the other ones. use of sensors have a different use in the whole process. They are included to increase the efficiency. “As per the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA) • two modules DC systems • four modules DC systems (0.7KWper day) • four modules AC system (0.7 per day) • eight modules AC systems (1.7KWH per day) • Eight modules hybrid wind turbines (2 KWH per day) • Eight modules hybrid propane gas generator (2 KWH per day)” Developing a solar streetlight The projects department required for this project 1- Project Manager 2- Design Department This department have two goals A -Make survey and prepare the Qty list and located on the map regarding the sunshine B-make design and specification and prepare the list of quantity with all specification 3- Engineering Department This project responsible about A- Received the goods of the project and check the specification regarding our design (initial receiving) B- Follow up the installation with the sub-contractor who install the equipment C- Follow up the inspection with the inspection company D- Complete the commissioning for this project NO Description Description NO. of Total person 1 Project Manager Mechanical Eng.+ finance 2 manager 2 2 Design department Design engineer 2 2 3 Engineering Department Industrial Eng. 1 1 Technician engineer (Follow up with installation 2 and inspection companies) 2 1 1 (supervisor) Store worker Total of persons works in this project 8 Note: we did not calculate the people which the work as subcontractors to install and inspection our project equipment because engineering department follow up them. The equipment (solar light streets) is important part of our project it means there are highly risk if the manufacturer refused to supply us when we need to purchase. So, we must collect three offers (at least) with same specification which we need. Regarding the solar streetlight there are many manufacturer companies inside USA so it easy to find other resources for our equipment project. And below the manufacturer companies we can deal with 1. WERISE Solar Street Lights Outdoor 2. PSG A0001 Solar Street Lights 3. Lovus ST60-010 Solar Street Light 4. RuoKid Solar Street Lights Outdoor 5. LOVUS ST300-033 Commercial Solar Street Light The second important part of our project is the installation we do same things .but there are other plane to open jobs for university student and training them how to install these solar system for one week and engineering department take care of that and rent the telescopic trucks and we can started on the summer time. The table below clearly shows the resources for each activity or deliverable and the estimated duration of each activity. The manpower for this project is a designer engineer, a project manager, two technicians and eight temporary workers. The total time is 30 days, or according to the preliminary schedule ID Task name Duration/day Resource name 1 Solar streetlights system 30 (Total Price 250,000) 2 1-1 survey 2 Project Manager (Total cost 145,000) 3 1.2 Design and purchase 5 Engineer, project manager 4 1-2-1 component design 2 Engineer, project manager 5 1-2-2 labor equipment design 1 project Manager 6 1-2-3 purchase of component 1 project manager 7 1-2-4 Procurement of labor 1 project manager 8 1-3 installation work 15 Total cost 75,000$ 9 1-3-1 installation solar panel 10 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager 10 1-3-2 installation of battery 2 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager 11 1-3-3 installation of charger controller 1 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager 12 1-3-4 installation sensors and change over 2 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager 13 1-4 inspection and commissioning 8 Total cost 30,000$ 14 1-4-1 Inspection 7 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager 15 1-4-2 commissioning 1 Engineer, Technician worker, project manager It does take time to load resources for each task or action and teach you how to total and maintain arrangements. The reality is that you just are doing this besides and why not have it be in the lockstep? Most plans and fee management frameworks now generate and obtain data accordingly. Once the resources are loaded according to the task, they can be transferred electronically to the charging management framework, and the cost and assets are estimated based on the task or the date distribution of the task. Since the plan is the basis for the complete plan, the pattern can be set, and you'll be guaranteed that you have 100% cost and plan integration for the extend standard. The standard can currently be locked and can be implemented See below our resources loaded with each Task for our project
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Explanation & Answer

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SOLAR STREET LED LIGHT SYSTEMS

I.

Project Introduction and Overview

The big problem today the pollution from the power plant which use the heavy
fuel which cause the pollution and change the environment for this reason the
world thinking seriously to find another source for the power. some of these goes
with solar power and others go with wind and ocean waves etc.
if we can do fast search on the internet, we can discover that the of solar lights
has spread within the past 5 years due to rising green innovations and rising
vitality road light. Among this move in moving towards more renewable vitality
sources for lighting, a critical address is being raised: how much do sun oriented
road lights cost compared to conventional road lighting?
Today we have project to change the street light poles for the university from the
electrical power to the solar power our targets for this project are to go green
power also, we saved money
with easy calculation we found the streetlight (LED) need 1.2 KWh per day
(12 hour*100 watt) =1200-watt hour=1.2 KWH
Number of
streetlights
01

Hourly Cost of Daily (12
Electricity in
hours)
kWh ($)

Monthly (30
days)

Yearly (365
days)

in kWh ($)

in kWh ($)

0.10

3.6

43.8

0.12

The above cost without the other cost like maintenance and changing light which
is cost around 40-45 USD per year for each street light Pole and this cost included
(Cost of Replacement Bulbs + Truck Rental + Rental of Man Lift + Salary of At Least
2 Workers).

If we assume we have 1000 street light pole in the university campus it means, we
need 4,272,00 KW/ year(4.272Mwatt), Regarding this amount of power, CO2

emissions around 4 million metric ton we added to this world per year if the
power plant used the petroleum which produce the minimum co2 emissions
The solar streetlight consists
1- Solar panel: the solar panel generated electricity in DC form and there are
two types (Poly-crystalline Solar Panel, Mono-crystalline Solar Panel)
2-Battery: are used to store the electricity generated by the solar panel.
During the day and there are many types of these battery
3-LED lamp
4- Charge controller
II.

Project Goals and Objectives

Our project has two goals
1- Go with green power and avoid world from more pollution commitment to
environmental sustainability.
2- Save money and used this money for decrease the student charges plus to
encourage other universities to do same things
3- This project is starting for big project to change all building of at the
university campus to solar power.

III.

Detailed Scope of solar streetlights

Our Project to change the streetlights without change the poles it means no need...


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I was struggling with this subject, and this helped me a ton!

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